A Color Filter for Retinal Photography⋆

A Color Filter for Retinal Photography⋆

281 NOTES, CASES, INSTRUMENTS liamson-Noble makes a most excellent suggestion; namely, to use the duochrome test, better known here as the bichrome ...

352KB Sizes 1 Downloads 36 Views

281

NOTES, CASES, INSTRUMENTS

liamson-Noble makes a most excellent suggestion; namely, to use the duochrome test, better known here as the bichrome test.2 This paper should be read by every eye physician. Another amplification of the subject, showing how the "balanced"

condition can be maintained throughout the test by means of correcting cross cylinders as well as testing cross cylinders, has been published by the writer. 3 37 West Ninety-seventh

Street.

REFERENCES 1 2 8

Pascal, J. I. Arch, of Ophth., 1940, Oct. Williamson-Noble. Brit. Jour. Ophth., 1943, Jan. Pascal, J. I. A new approach to cross cylinder tests. New York State Jour. Med., 1943, Feb.

AN ILLUMINATED RETRACTOR F O R EYE O P E R A T I O N S E S P E ­ CIALLY FOR DETACHMENT O F T H E RETINA* CONRAD BERENS,

M.D.

New York Because of the need for good illumi­ nation in operations for detachment of the retina, orbital operations, and opera­ tions on the inferior-oblique muscle, an

GROOVED PORT/ON

8 mm. w/£>£ /smm.iOA/G

illuminated retractor has been devised. This may be inserted into a flashlight han­ dle (fig. 1) or attached to a cord and rheostat. The retractor is of plastic ma­ terial, the handle is 51 mm. long, and the tip 18 mm long by 8 mm. in diam­ eter. The tip forms an angle of 165 de­ grees with the handle. The tip is con­ cavo-convex to facilitate the manipula­ tion of electrolysis and diathermy tips and needles in the hollowed-out part. The tip is slightly frosted to project the light onto the scleral surface. 35 East Seventieth Street.

A COLOR F I L T E R F O R R E T I N A L PHOTOGRAPHY* FERDINAND L.

P. KOCH,

M.D.

New York

Fig. 1 (Berens). An illuminated plastic retractor.

It has become necessary for many who use the carbon-arc models of the ZeissNordenson retinal cameras for color de­ lineation of the eyegrounds, to decelerate their activities in this respect because of the relative scarcity of daylight Kodachrome film in the bantam pack (K828), although those who work with the later nitra-lamp instruments still are able to

* This study was aided by a grant from the Ophthalmological Foundation, Inc. Made by V. Mueller & Company, Chicago, Illinois.

* From the Departments of Ophthalmology of the College of Medicine, New York Univer­ sity and Bellevue Hospital.

STRMD/MD FLASHLtOHT TH/?£/}0

282

SOCIETY PROCEEDINGS

obtain the artificial-light Kodachrome (K828A). The latter, perhaps, does not afford quite so true a coloration as does the former but it is adequate. Similar, reasonably true values may be attained with carbon-arc illumination and arti­ ficial-light color film if one resorts to the expediency of using an accessory filter. This may be done inexpensively with the use of a Type A, C4-Harrison filter, which may still be purchased on the open market. One may obtain it in various sizes according to whether the operator

of the camera wishes to place the filter in front of the objective lens at the pa­ tient's end of the photographic tube or to have it reground for placement in the small, removable filter frame that is re­ ceived into a slot in the stationary verti­ cal tube situated between the shutter housing and the prism-placement group­ ing just to the rear of the source of il­ lumination. It is not necessary with this device to alter one's amperage and ex­ posure tables. 780 Park Avenue.

SOCIETY PROCEEDINGS EDITED BY DR. DONALD T. LYLE

CHICAGO OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY November 16, 1942 DR. LOUIS

G. HOFFMAN, president

CLINICAL MEETING

(Presented by the Department of Oph­ thalmology, University of Illinois) BILATERAL OPTIC-NERVE ATROPHY ( J U V E ­ N I L E TABOPARESIS)

DR. MARTHA RUBIN FOLK presented

the case of A. K., a 16-year-old boy who, when first seen on September 4, 1912, complained of blurring of vision for a period of four years. Vision was 0.1 in each eye. The pupils were unequal in size, the right measuring 4 mm. and the left 3.5 mm.; the left pupil reacted sluggishly to light. Upon ophthalmoscopic examina­ tion, the optic papilla was seen to be pale, with clear margins and narrowing of the vessels. Perimetric study showed concen­ tric contraction of 20 degrees of both visual fields to form and color. Homat-

ropine refraction revealed an error of R.E. +2.75D. sph. =c= +0.25D. cyl. ax. 180°, vision 0.1; L.E. 4-2.50D. sph., vision 0.1. The blood Wassermann reaction was 4 + , and 1 + Kahn. Colloidal gold curve of the spinal fluid showed 5321555300. Diagnosis made by the Department of Neurology was that of central-nervoussystem syphilis with the possibility of early taboparesis. Antisyphilitic therapy was instituted. CONGENITAL ABSENCE OF LEFT PUNCTA

DR. ROOSEVELT BROOKS presented H.

B., a man, aged 22 years, who was re­ ferred by the Selective Service Board for correction of tearing in the left eye. On examination, the right eye was found to be entirely normal. The left eye was watery but the conjunctiva was not injected. Complete absence of the puncta above and below was found. No opening of the lacrimal sac could be found in the nose and it was assumed that the sac was also absent.