A note on the Jacobian Conjecture

A note on the Jacobian Conjecture

Linear Algebra and its Applications 435 (2011) 2110–2113 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Linear Algebra and its Applications journal homep...

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Linear Algebra and its Applications 435 (2011) 2110–2113

Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

Linear Algebra and its Applications journal homepage: w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / l a a

A note on the Jacobian Conjecture Dan Yan School of Mathematical Sciences, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China

ARTICLE INFO

ABSTRACT

Article history: Received 19 December 2010 Accepted 11 January 2011 Available online 29 March 2011

In this note, we show that, if the Druzkowski mappings F (X ) = X + (AX )∗3 , i.e. F (X ) = (x1 + (a11 x1 + · · · + a1n xn )3 , . . . , xn + (an1 x1 + · · · + ann xn )3 ), satisfies TrJ ((AX )∗3 ) = 0, then rank(A)  12 (n + δ) where δ is the number of diagonal elements of A which are equal to

Submitted by R.A. Brualdi

zero. Furthermore, we show the Jacobian Conjecture is true for the Druzkowski mappings in dimension 9 in the case ni=1 aii  = 0. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

AMS classification: Primary: 14E05 Secondary: 14A05, 14R15 Keywords: Jacobian Conjecture Polynomial mapping Druzkowski mapping

Let F = (F1 (x1 , . . . , xn ), . . . , Fn (x1 , . . . , xn ))t : Cn → Cn be a polynomial mapping, that is, ∂F Fi (x1 , . . . , xn ) ∈ C[x1 , . . . , xn ] for all 1  i  n. Let JF = ( ∂ xi )n×n be the Jacobian matrix of F. The j

well-known Jacobian Conjecture (JC) raised by Keller in 1939 [1] states that a polynomial mapping F : Cn → Cn is invertible if the Jacobian determinant |JF | is a nonzero constant. This conjecture has being attacked by many people from various research fields and remains open even when n = 2! (Of course, a positive answer is obvious when n = 1 by the elements of linear algebra.) See [2,3] and the references therein for a wonderful 70-years history of this famous conjecture. It can be easily seen that JC is true if JC holds for all polynomial mappings whose Jacobian determinant is 1. We make use of this convention in the present paper. Among the vast interesting and valid results, a relatively satisfactory result obtained by Wang [4] in 1980 is that JC holds for all polynomial mappings of degree 2 in all dimensions. The most powerful and surprising result is the reduction to degree 3, due to Bass et al. [2] in 1982 and Yagzhev [5] in 1980, which asserts that JC is true if JC holds for all polynomial mappings of degree 3 (what is more, if JC holds for all cubic homogeneous polynomial mappings!). In the same spirit of the above degree reduction method, another efficient way to tackle JC is the Druzkowski’s Theorem [6]: JC is true if it is true for all Druzkowski mappings (in all dimension  2). E-mail address: [email protected] 0024-3795/$ - see front matter © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.laa.2011.01.016

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Recall that F is a cubic homogeneous map if F = X + H with X the identity (written as a column vector) and each component of H being either zero or cubic homogeneous. A cubic homogeneous mapping F = X + H is a Druzkowski (or cubic linear) mapping if each component of H is either zero or a third power of a linear form. Each Druzkowski mapping F is associated to a scalar matrix A such that F = X + (AX )∗3 , where (AX )∗3 is the Druzkowski symbol for the vector (A1 X )3 , . . . , (An X )3 ) with Ai the ith row of A. Clearly, a Druzkowski mapping is uniquely determined by this matrix A. Theorem. Let F = X + H be a Druzkowski mapping. If TrJ ((AX )∗3 ) δ is the number diagonal elements of A which are equal to zero. Proof of Theorem. Set ti we have a11 t12

= ai1 x1 + ai2 x2 + · · · + ain xn for 1  i  n. Since TrJ ((AX )∗3 ) = 0, therefore,

+ a22 t22 + · · · + ann tn2 = 0

i.e.





a ⎜ 11 ⎜ ⎜ a12 ⎜ (x1 , x2 , . . . , xn )[a11 ⎜ . ⎜ . ⎜ . ⎝ a1n ⎛ ⎞ x ⎜ 1⎟ ⎜ ⎟ ⎜ x2 ⎟ ⎟ ⎜ . ⎟=0 ×⎜ ⎜ . ⎟ ⎜ . ⎟ ⎝ ⎠ xn Since (At DA)t ⎡

D

=

Set r (A) where

Er

=

= 0, then rank(A)  12 (n + δ) where

⎛ a ⎟ ⎜ n1 ⎟ ⎜ ⎟ ⎜ an2 ⎟ ⎜ ⎟ (a11 , a12 , . . . , a1n ) + · · · + ann ⎜ . ⎟ ⎜ . ⎟ ⎜ . ⎠ ⎝ ann

⎞ ⎟ ⎟ ⎟ ⎟ ⎟ (an1 , an2 , . . . , ann )] ⎟ ⎟ ⎠

= At DA, therefore, we have At DA = 0 where a11

0

⎢ ⎢ ⎢ 0 a22 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢··· ··· ⎣ 0 0

··· 0

⎤ ⎥ ⎥

··· 0 ⎥ ⎥. ⎥ ··· ··· ⎥ ⎦ · · · ann

= r. Then there exists invertible matrices P and Q such that PAQ = Er and (PAQ )t = Er ⎡ 1 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ 0 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢··· ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ 0 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ 0 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢··· ⎣ 0



··· 0 ··· 0 ⎥ ⎥ 1 ··· 0 ··· 0 ⎥ ⎥ 0



··· ··· ··· ··· ···⎥ ⎥ ⎥

··· 1 ··· 0 ⎥ ⎥. ⎥ 0 ··· 0 ··· 0 ⎥ ⎥

0



··· ··· ··· ··· ···⎥ ⎥ 0

··· 0 ··· 0



Therefore, we have At DA = (Q t )−1 Er (P t )−1 DP −1 Er Q −1 = 0. Set H = (P t )−1 DP −1 and H = (hij )n×n . Since P is invertible, so we have rank(H ) = rank(D) = n − δ . Therefore, we get Er HEr = 0

2112

i.e.

D. Yan / Linear Algebra and its Applications 435 (2011) 2110–2113





h11 h12

⎢ ⎢ ⎢ h21 h22 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢··· ··· ⎢ ⎢ ⎢h ⎢ r1 hr2 ⎢ ⎢ 0 0 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢··· ··· ⎣ 0 0 Since rank(H ) proof.  Lemma. Let F

· · · h1r 0 · · · 0 ⎥ ⎥ · · · h2r 0 · · · 0 ⎥ ⎥ ⎥

··· ··· ··· ··· ···⎥ ⎥ ⎥

··· 0

··· 0 ⎥ ⎥ = 0. ⎥ 0 ··· 0 ⎥ ⎥

··· 0

0

· · · hrr

0



··· ··· ··· ··· ···⎥ ⎥ ··· 0



= n − δ , so r  n + δ − r. Therefore, we have r  12 (n + δ), which completes the

= X + H be a Druzkowski mappings. If detJF = 1 and rankA  4, then F is invertible.

Proof of Lemma. Since rankA  4, some columns of A are a C-linear combination of the other columns, 4 say, Ai = j=1 λij Aj , where λij ∈ C, 5  i  n. Consider now the coordinate transformation Y =

(y1 , . . . , yn−1 , yn )t = PX with transition matrix ⎡

P

=

1 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ 0 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢··· ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ 0 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ 0 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢··· ⎣ 0



0

0

1

0

λ51 · · · λn1 ⎥ ⎥ 0 λ52 · · · λn2 ⎥ ⎥

0



··· ··· ··· ··· ··· ··· ⎥ ⎥ 1

0

0

0



λ54 · · · λn4 ⎥ ⎥, ⎥ 0 1 ··· 0 ⎥ ⎥ 0



··· ··· ··· ··· ··· ··· ⎥ ⎥ 0

0

0

0

··· 1



 equivalently, yj = xj + ni=5 λij xi for all 1  j  4 and yj = xj for all 5  j  n. Let Y4 = t (y1 , y2 , y3 , y4 ) . Note that the polynomial map H ∈ C[x1 , . . . , xn ]n is now also a polynomial map in C[y1 , y2 , y3 , y4 ]n . Indeed, if we denote by B the left-uppermost 4 × 4 submatrix of A, then it is easily checked that H = (BY4 )∗3 ∈ C[y1 , y2 , y3 , y4 ]n . To reduce the dimension  of variables, we introduce a new cubic homogeneous map G by G(X ) = PF (X ), namely, Gj = Fj + ni=5 λij Fi for all 1  j  4 and Gj = Fj for all 5  j  n. Moreover,

= J (PF (P −1 Y )) = PJF (X )P −1 . So |JG(Y )| = 1. Put g1 = (G1 , G2 , G3 , G4 )t , g2 = (G4 , . . . , Gn )t . Since Gj = xj + Hj = yj + Hj with Hj a polynomial of C[y1 , y2 , y3 , y4 ] for all 5  j  n, we see that ∂ Gj (Y ) t ∂ yj = 1 for all 5  j  n. So the Jacobian matrix of G with respect to the variables Y = (y1 , . . . , yn ) JG(Y )

has the following form: ⎡ ⎤ Jg1 0 ⎣ ⎦, JG(Y ) = Jg2 (Y )t In−4×n−4 where Jg1 is the Jacobian matrix of g1 with respect to variables y1 , . . . , y4 . Therefore |Jg1 (y1 , . . . , y4 | = |JG(Y )| = 1. Since g = (G1 , . . . , G4 )t ∈ C[y1 , . . . , y4 ]4 is cubic homogeneous, we infer from the

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conclusion in [7] that g1 is invertible, so yj ∈ C[G1 , . . . , G4 ] for all 1  j  4. Hence, we have for all 1  j  4 that ⎤ ⎡ n n n    λij xi ∈ C[G1 , . . . , G4 ] = C ⎣F1 + λi1 Fi , . . . , F4 + λi4 Fi ⎦ ⊆ C[F1 , . . . , Fn ]. xj + i=5

i=5

i=5

Moreover, xj = Fj − Hj ∈ C[y1 , . . . , y4 , F5 , . . . , Fn ] ⊆ C[F1 , . . . , Fn ] for all 5 C[x1 , . . . , xn ] ⊆ C[F1 , . . . , Fn ] and F is invertible. This completes the proof. 

 j  n. Therefore,

Since the Jacobian Conjecture is true for all cubic homogeneous polynomials in dimension 4 (see [7]), we have the following conclusion: Corollary. Let F = X + H be a Druzkowski mapping. If for the Druzkowski mappings in dimension  9.

n

i=1

aii

= 0, then the Jacobian Conjecture is true

 Proof of Corollary. Since detJF = 1, we have TrJ ((AX )∗3 ) = 0. If ni=1 aii  = 0, we have δ = 0. Therefore, rank(A)  n2 . If n  9, we have rank(A)  4. So we infer the conclusion from the Lemma.



In the proof of the theorem, we have r (A) bound for rank(A) in such case. Example. Let n = 4, and ⎧ ⎪ F1 = (x1 + ix2 + x3 + x4 )3 + x1 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎨ F = i(x + ix + x + x )3 + x 2 1 2 3 4 2 ⎪ F = −(x + ix − x + x )3 + x ⎪ ⎪ 3 1 2 3 4 3 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ 3 F4 = −(x1 + ix2 − x3 + x4 ) + x4 . Then we have ⎡

A

=

1

i

1

⎢ ⎢ ⎢ −i 1 −i ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ −1 −i 1 ⎣ −1 −i 1

1

 n2 . Now we give an example to show that is the best

(1)

⎤ ⎥

⎥ −i ⎥ ⎥

⎥,

−1 ⎥ ⎦ −1

and clearly, F is invertible and rank(A)

= 2.

Acknowledgments The author is very grateful to Professor Yuehui Zhang who introduced the Conjecture and gave great help when the author studied the problem and Professor Guoping Tang who read the paper carefully and gave some good advice. References [1] O.H. Keller, Ganze Cremona-transformationen Monatschr, Math. Phys. 47 (1939) 229–306. [2] H. Bass, E. Connell, D. Wright, The Jacobian Conjecture: reduction of degree and formal expansion of the inverse, Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. 7 (1982) 287–330. [3] Arno van den Essen, Polynomial Automophisms and Jacobian Conjecture, first ed., Birkhauser Basel, 2000. [4] S.S.S. Wang, A Jacobian criterion for separability, J. Algebra 65 (1980) 453–494. [5] A.V. Yagzhev, On Keller’s problem, Siberian Math. J. 21 (1980) 747–754. [6] L.M. Druzkowski, An effective approach to Keller’s Jacobian Conjecture, Math. Ann. 264 (1983) 303–313. [7] E. Hubbers, Nilpotent Jacobians, Ph.D. thesis, Univ. of Nijmegen, Toernooiveld, 6525 ED, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 1998.