Annual Meeting

Annual Meeting

American Pharmaceutical Association 134th APhA Annual Meeting March 28-April2, 1987 Look at What You Get! Full registration entitles you to all this...

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American Pharmaceutical Association 134th APhA Annual Meeting March 28-April2, 1987

Look at What You Get! Full registration entitles you to all this: * Fimore ve days of top-notch educational programming offering than 150 hours of credit * Largest-ever display of pharmacy products and services in the Exhibit Hall ** Two Grand Opening Reception General Sessions featuring nationally known speakers ** Networking Daily food festivals Exchange ** Residency and Chapter Forum Sessions * Poster Gala APhA Reception and Banquet All-New Fonnat To make it even more convenient-and economical-to participate, the Annual Meeting has a new format this year. Activities will begin on Saturday and end Wednesday at noon so you can get maximum value with the minimum number of weekdays away from home and work. And the Saturday night stayover in Chicago ensures that you qualify for the lowest-priced airfares available through APhA's official Annual Meeting travel agent.

REGGIE Is Back ~

Returning from last year is REGGIE-the APhA Computer Registrar-and he'd like to be the first to invite you to the 1987 APhA Annual Meeting in Chicago, Saturday, March 28 to Wednesday, Aprill. REGGIE makes registering for the Annual Meeting easier than ever. Simply send REGGIE the form on the last page of this program, on which you've marked those educational sessions, tours, special events, and hotel accommodations you prefer. Then, to get discounted airfares, call REGGIE toll free at (800) 621-1083. Be an "early bird" and register by January 30, 1987, to get lower registration fees. (Also, because hotel rooms and meeting events are filled on a first-come, first-served basis, you have a better chance of obtaining your top choices if you register early.) Registrations received after January 30 will be processed at the higher fee. REGGIE must receive all mail-in registrations by February 27, 1987. If you miss that deadline, you can bring your form with you and register on site in Chicago. A.merican Pharmacy. Vol. NS27. No.1. January 1987/27

+ Main Attractions + Opening General Session Saturday, March 28, 3:00 pm-5:00 pm You've seen him on "World News this Morning" and "Good Morning, America"-now you'll see ABC news ~orrespondent Steve Bell in person as he keynotes the OpenIng General Session. Bell, this year's Parke-Davis lectu:er, h~s had more than the average share of excitement durIng hIS 20-year career with ABC. In 1970, as a combat correspondent in Vietnam, he and his crew were captured by the Vietcong. In 1974 he was a White House reporter during the tumultuous Watergate era. These days he often leaves his anchor desk to cover such overseas -events as the opening of the Geneva anus talks and the royal wedding of Prince Andrew. Another highlight of the session will be presentation of the profession's highest awards. And a multimedia presentation, supported by a grant from Marion Laboratories, will wrap up the session on a high note. Bell

Second General Session The Economics of Health Care Todayand in the Next Five Years Monday, March 30,8:30 am-10:00 am

Reinhardt

The way health care is paid for in this country has been undergoing major changes of late, and is expected to keep changing. What, specifically, are these changes, and how do pharmacists fit into the new picture? Uwe Reinhardt, the James Madison professor of political economy at Princeton University, will paint an overall picture of the economics of health care, focusing on public and private-sector initiatives. He will also draw upon his vast research in health economics to talk about some of the changes that lie ahead. Reinhardt's presentation is made possible by a grant from Du Pont Pharmaceuticals. In the second half, Drug Topics will present the results of a survey on "Group Health Care and Pharmacy: The Next Five Years." Hear what major corporations' health benefits managers say about the role they envision for pharmacists; what administrators of preferred-provider organizations find their clients are looking for, and what services they'd like pharmacists to provide; and what type of involvement health maintenance organizations and private insurers envision for community pharmacists. 28

American Pharmacy, Vol. NS27, No.1, January 1987/2

APhA Reception and Banquet Tuesday, March 31, 6:30 pm-midnight

Russell

Join us for the social highlight of the week! The evening will begin with a reception in the dazzling Grand Ballroom of the Chicago Hilton and Towers. After dinner, laugh along with TV's "poet laureate," Nipsey Russell, then dance until midnight. Russell, a frequent guest on the "Tonight Show" and on popular game shows and celebrity panels, is known for his zany rhymes and sharp wit. His philosophy is "keep laughing and keep living." For this grand finale event, suits or tuxedos are suggested for the gentlemen and dresses or gowns for the ladies. Seats will be limited, so be sure to note on the registration form if you plan to attend. Nipsey Russell's appearance is supported by a grant from E.R. Squibb & Sons.

Exhibit Hall Saturday, March 28-Tuesday, March 31 Combine infonnal education and social activities-visit the Exhibit Hall! The many displays will feature new products) state-of-the-art technology, and services that aid practicing pharmacis~s and phannaceutical scientists. At APhA's Exhibit and Leadership Center you can get information about APhA's member benefits, continuing education, policy issues, publications, future meetings, and other services. Stop by, meet your past and present leaders, and see how APhA is working for you. Daily food festivals will take place in the Exhibit Hall's "City of Neighborhoods," set against a backdrop of the Chicago skyline. Drawing upon Chicago's ethnic heritage, each festival offers a slice of culture reflecting the ·city's immigrant past. The Grand Opening Reception on Saturday evening, an elegant introduction to the week's festivities, features the food and wines of Italy. Strolling musicians provide a continental ambiance while meeting-goers sample gounnet delicacies from Naples, Milan, Rome, and Venice. Everything from schnitzel to strudel, pierogis to potato pancakes, Polish dancing and German song, will be offered at the rousing PolishiGennan fest on Sunday. Arnerican Pharmacy, Vol. NS27, No.1, January 1987/29

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Flutes and folk dancers will entertain as registrants sample "a wee bit of Ireland" on Mo~day. Try traditional Iri h stew and soda bread, corned beef n cabbage, hearty potato soup, and salmon specialties. You need not be an O'Brien or an O'Casey to enjoy the day! At 'fuesday's festival, you'll be swept up in the spirit of Greece as you taste Mediterranean delights-:-mous~a~a, ouvlaki, gyros, spanokopita, baklava-and enJoy tradItIonal Greek music and dancing.

PhUNRun Sunday, March 29,6:30 am-7:30 am Want an invigorating workout-or simply a chance to join in some early morning fun and camaraderie? Whatever your age or ability, come join us for the 2nd Annual PhUN Run, supported by A.H. Robins Company. The PhUN Run will begin behind McCormick Place-on-the-Lake and head north along Lake Michigan. All "early bird" registrants who sign up for the PhUN Run will receive a souvenir gift. Don't miss out on the PhUN!

rofessional Placement Service

Placement Service Form Request Name ______________________=-_______________________ (Type or print)

) nce again APhA is offering its free >rofessional Placement Service at the ~nnual Meeting. To speed service at the )lacement center, supply your application if you're job seeking) or details about your racancy (if you're an employer) in advance by illing out a placement form and returning it ,0 the National Registry for Pharmacists no ater than March 13. (To obtain placement arms, send in the "Placement Service Form lequest" by March 2.) Your employment lpplications andjob listings will be accepted ~ven if you're unable to attend the meeting, md will be available for participants to ~eview on site.

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Organization ________________________________________ (Employers list)

Address _____________________________________________ (Applicants: use horne address)

City/State/Zip _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

0 0

Candidate Application (only one required) Employer Position Listing (one per vacancy-numberrequired _

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Please complete this form and detach along the bold line. Return compl form by March 2, 1987, to: National Registry for Pharmacists Illinois Job Service 29 E. Congress Pkwy., 1st Floor Chicago, IL 60605

American Pharmacy, Vol. NS27, No.1, January 1987/3(

More Attractions "Leadership ... Your Future!" Saturday, March 28, 9 :30 am-11 :30 am Find out how to assume a leadership role in the workplace from Ed Foreman, a man who knows firsthand about getting ahead. A millionaire by the age of 26 and a congressman at age 28, he now conducts training seminars across the country. His tips for self-development will help you recognize and take advantage of the many opportunities opening up in today's health care field. Presented by Phi Lambda Sigma, and supported by an educational grant from McNeil Pharmaceutical.

Saturday, March 28,7:30 pm-9:30 pm Dessert, coffee, cordials, and networking are on the menu for this Office of Women's Affairs event. Plan to attend and meet with colleagues interested in leadership in pharmacy.

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Winning Second Season," Monday, March 30,7:00 am-8:30 am APhA members, including PAC advisors, contributors, and potential contributors, are invited to help launch a second successful year for APhA's Political Action Committee. The breakfast speaker will be a noted figure in national politics. Founder's Club pins will be presented to those who donated $500 each to help the PAC get started. (Fee: $14)

The 1987 Annual Meeting will offer a wide range of contributed papers dealing with clinical, scientific, entrepreneurial, and policy-related aspects of pharmacy.

The poster sessions will be in the Exhibit Hall area Sunday through Tuesday, so attendees can stop by at their convenience to see these displays of research findings and other important information.



N(llh\'oloking Exehallge •

A daily "discussion corner" activity popular at last year's meeting, the Networking Exchange is designed to ease the way for one-on-one sharing of ideas in an informal atmosphere.

A new feature of the Networking Exchange, the Residency and Chapter Forum will allow students to learn about residencies from the institutions that offer them, and will give chapters an opportunity to share ideas and highlight their activities.



FiI·st

TilllPI·S •

If this is your first time at an Annual Meeting-<>r it's been a long while since you've attended-be sure to mark the "first timer" box on the registration form. You'll get a special ribbon for your badge, and can take advantage of activities planned just for you. Information will be on hand at the First Timers booth in the registration area.

Education will again be offered along five tracks-Clinical Institutional, Clinical Community, EntrepreneuriallEconomic, ScientificlResearch, and Policy-making it easier for registrants to identify sessions that are especially valuable to them. American Pharmacy, Vol. NS27, No. 1. Januarv 1987/31

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APhA Annual Meeting Offers Paper/Poster Podium Sessions APhA Annual Meetings provide pharmacists with an unparalleled opportunity to become updated with the very latest information in such areas as pharmaceutical research and development, health care delivery, legal aspects of pharmacy, clinical advancements, and practice innovations, especially through contributed papers which are presented in podium and poster sessions. The days and times of Podium Sessions are as listed in the Advance Program, which was published in the December issue of American Pharmacy. All Poster Sessions are located in the Exhibit Hall and will be available for viewing from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm on Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday during the Annual Meeting week. Authors of poster session contributed papers will be available to discuss their research with registrants at the times designated in the following listing. Don't miss this "user friendly" way to participate in a valuable continuing education activity. Continuing education credit is offered for participation. Registrants should check instructions provided at the Annual Meeting to determine credit acceptance by their respective state boards .of pharmacy. Abstracts of all papers listed here by title will be available at the Annual Meeting or from APhA. Registrants for the Annual Meeting may order their abstract book by checking the appropriate box on the registration fonn. Contributed paper podium sessions are 20 minute discussions, including a 5-minute question and answer session, on the topics listed.

200 Nuclear Pharmacy Contributed Papers Podium Session Sunday, March 29, 8:30 am-11 :30 am (0.3 CEU) 1. 8:30 am-B:50 am Nuclear Pharmacy Competition: Customer Attitudes. M. P. Kavula, Jr. and E. O. Akinosho, Mercer University Southern School of Pharmacy, Atlanta, GA 30312. 2. B:50 am-9:10 am Volatilization of99mTc-Sulfur Colloid Prepared by Commercial Nuclear Pharmacies. M. P. Kavula, Jr. and M. L. Ladan, Mercer University Southern School of Pharmacy, Atlanta, GA 30312. 3. 9:10 am-9:30 am Clinical Utility -of 99mTc-Albumin Colloid in Gastric Scintigraphy Studies. S. J. Harwood, D. L. Laven, G. J. McNulty, Jr., and P. Ottoson, Nuclear Medicine Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Bay Pines, FL 33504. 4. 9:30 am-9:50 am Dosimetry of Intracoronary 99mTc-MAA. J. A. Ponto, University of Iowa, Iowa City. 5. 9:50 am-10:10 am An Evaluation of Operating Costs of Nuclear Pharmacies. L. J. Kirchdoerfer and E. Jacobs, College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha.

10:10 am-11 :30 am discussion .

216 Policy Contributed Papers Podium Session Sunday, March 29, 2:30 pm-4:00 pm (0.15 CEU) 1. 2:30 pm-2:50 pm. A Preliminary Evaluation of the Orphan Drug Act of 1983. Charlotte A. Jankel and David A. Knapp, School of Pharmacy, The University of Maryland, Baltimore. 2. 2:50 pm-3:10 pm A Survey of Patent Infringements Involving Generic Drugs and Medical Devices-Pharmacists Take Caution! T. C. Holsomback, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, Texas.

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3. 3:10 pm-3:30 pm General Guidelines for Drug Utilization Review in Organized Health Plans. Dennis. W. Raisch, Lon N. Larson, and Vijit Chinburapa, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 8572l. 4. 3:30 pm-3:50 pm Pharmacist and Drug Manufacturer Liability in Drug Products Litigation. C. E. Berman and D. P. Roller, Rooks, Pitts and Poust, Chicago, Illinois.

220 ScientificlResearch Economic, Social, and Administrative Sciences Contributed Papers Podium Session Sunday, March 29, 2:30 pm-5:30 pm (0.3 CEU) 1. 2:30 pm-2:50 pm Consumer Attitudes About Community Pharmacies. E. W. Jacobs and A. A. Nelson, College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska, Omaha, . and Idaho State University, Pocatello. 2. 2:50 pm-3:10 pm Early Implementation of the Florida Pharmacist Prescribing Law: Pharmacist Perspectives. W. C. McCormick, H. J. Eng, and C. L. Kimberlin, Department of Pharmacy Health Care Administration, University of Florida, Gainesville. 3. 3:10 pm-3:30 pm Early Implementation of the Florida Pharmacist Prescribing Law: Consumer Perspectives. W. C. McCormick, A. S. Pennock, H. J. Eng, and R. A. Angorn, Department of Pharmacy Health Care Administration, University of Florida, Gainesville. 4. 3:30 pm-3:50 pm The Effect of Medication Refill Reminders and Manufacturer's Special Packaging on Patient Compliance with Oral Hypoglycemic Agents. D. A. Sclar, W. M. Dickson, College of Pharmacy, The University of South Carolina, Columbia. 5. 3:50 pm-4:10 pm Effects of a Prescription Drug Copayment on the Utilization of Medical Services by Hypertensive Medicaid Recipients. C. E. Reeder,J. L. Elias, andA. S. AlMuallem, College of Pharmacy, The University of South Carolina, Columbia.

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6. 4:10 pm-4:30 pm Positive Work Characteristics of Three

Pharmacy Practice Settings. R. M. Schulz, College of Pharmacy, The University of South Carolina, Columbia. 7. 4:30 pm-4:50 pm An Assessment of Profits Realized from Medicaid Versus Private-Pay Prescriptions in Florida Community Pharmacies. W. C. McCormick, S. Das*, H. J. Eng, Department of Pharmacy Health Care Administration, University of Florida, Gainesville, and *School of Pharmacy, Northeast Louisiana University, Monroe. 8. 4:50 pm-5:10 pm Factors Influencing the Utilization of Nondispensing Professional Pharmaceutical Services by Consumers. H. A. Monsanto and H. L. Mason, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. 9. 5:10 pm-5:30 pm Community Pharmacy Initiated Postmarketing Surveillance. H. L. Mason, S. W. Schondelmeyer, M. R. Lahoz, H. A. Monsanto, S. S. Johnson, C. D. Black, and R. K . Chalmers, School of Pharmacy & Pharmacal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana.

9. 5:10 pm-5:30 pm Predictors of Patient Satisfaction with HMO Pharmacy Services. J. E. Fincham, University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi and A. I. Wertheimer, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. 10. 5:30 pm-5:50 pm Prescribing Intention and the Rel~tive Importance of Drug Attributes: A Comparative Study of HMO and Fee-for-Service Physicians. Vijit Chinburapa, Lon N. Larson, J. Lyle Bootman, and G. I. Nicholson, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721.

317 Scientific/Research Economic, Social, and Administrative Sciences Contributed Papers Podium Session Monday, March 30, 2:30 pm-6:00 pm (0.35 CEU)

1. 2:30 pm-2:50 pm Reasons for Consumers' High Regard for Pharmacists' Ethical Standards. R.M. Schulz, and O. Akoni, College of Pharmacy, The University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina. 2. 2:50 pm-3:10 pm Acceptance of the Consultant Role of the Female Pharmacist. Mary Tronchetti, Laima Cernius, & Donna Dolinsky. College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60605. 3. 3:10 pm-3:30 pm Factors Influencing Physician Prescribing of Rx-To-OTC Switched Drugs. S. Madhavan and S. W. Schondelmeyer, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. 4. 3:30 pm-3:50 pm Effect of Demographic and Practice Characteristics on Physician Evaluation of Rx-To-OTC Switch Candidates. S. Madhavan and S. W. Schondelmeyer, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. 5. 3:50 pm-4:10 pm An Examination of the Relationship Between Age and OTC Analgesic Drug Use. A. Schwartz and F. B. Palumbo, School of Pharmacy, The University of Maryland, Baltimore. 6. 4:10 pm-4:30 pm Selective Patient Monitoring in a Hospital Setting. F. J. Ascione, D. M. Kirking, and T. F Crampton, University of Michigan, College of Pharmacy, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. 7. 4:30 pm-4:50 pm Effect of Drug Cost and Risk on Therapeutic Substitution Decisions in Hospitals. L. Miley and M. Dickson, College of Pharmacy, The University of South Carolina, Columbia. 8. 4:50 pm-5:10 pm The Effect of Drug Characteristics on P&T Committee Member Approval of Drugs for a Formulary. S. Charoensakwatana and M. Dickson, College of Pharmacy, The University of South Carolina, Columbia.

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318 Clinical InstitutionallClinical Community Contributed Papers Podium Session Monday, March 30, 2:30 pm-4:30 pm

(0.2 CEU) 1. 2:30 pm-2:50 pm Increasing Control Among Treated Hypertensives. Donald O. Fedder, Elijah Saunders, University of Maryland, School of Pharmacy, Baltimore. 2. 2:50 pm-3:10 pm Individually Tailored Hospital Externship Programs: The Key to the Pharmacy Curriculum. W. Barre and B. Couris, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Boston. 3. 3:10 pm-3:30 pm Directions for Institutional Pharmacy Practice in New England. F. R. Vogenberg, and S. Fish, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Boston. 4. 3:30 pm-3:50 pm The Effects of Continuing Drug Utilization Projects on Prescribing Patterns of Physicians in Teaching Non-University Affiliated Hospitals. J. J. Tanja, School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Alabama. 5. 3:50 pm-4:10 pm A Guided Design Instructional Methodology to Self Care Practice Problems. S. M. Pawlak, N. G. Popovich, and J. W. Blank, Purdue University School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana.

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6. 4:10 pm-4:30 pm Knowledge and Attitudes About Tobacco Among Pharmacists Who Do and Do Not Sell Tobacco. L. Davidson and C. L. Stang, College of Pharmacy, Rutgers University and J. Slade, Robert Wood, Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey.

404 Scientific!Research Contributed Papers Podium Session

5. 9:50 am-10:10 am Determining Appropriate Inventory Levels in the Community Pharmacy. J. G. Boyer and J . P Gagnon , Sch ool of Pharmacy, Un iver sity of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. 6. 10:10 am-10:30 am Federal Outpatient P harmacies: Workload and Pharmacist to Technician Ratios. G. Pulvermacher, J. Mac Kowiak, J.P Gagnon, School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel H ill , NC 27514.

Tuesday, March 31, 8:30 am-10:00 am (0.15 CEU) 1. 8:30 am-8:50 am Study of the Effect of Selected Water Soluble Carbohydrates on the Dissolution Profile of Selected Poorly Water Soluble Drugs, by Coprecipitation Method. S. U. Ahmed and P L. Mada n , College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions, St. John's University, J amaica, NY 11439. 2. 8:50 am -9:10 am The Stabilization Effect of~Cyclodex­ trin ( ~ -C D ) and Heptakis( 2 , 6-D i -O -Methyl) -~-Cyclo-De­ xtrin (DIME B) on the Antineoplastic Agent Melphalan. A. R. Green and J . K. Guillory, College of Pharmacy, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52240. 3. 9:10 am-9:30 amln Vitro Release of Salicylic Acid (SA) from Polymethacrylate (Eudragit L100 R )-Polyethlene Gycol (PEG 6000) Films. Mark McCurdy and Umesh Banakar, Creighton University, School of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions, Omaha, NE 68178. 4. 9:30 am-9:50 am Metoclopramide Pharmacokinetics in Pregnant and Nonpregnant Sheep. K. W. Riggs*, J. E. Axelson*tr , B. A. McErlane*, N.C . Gruber tr , S.M. Taylor tr , G. H. McMorland tr , D. W. Ruraktr. Faculties of Pharmaceutical Sciences* and Medicine tr , University of Br itish Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. 9:50 am-10:00 am Discussion

405 Entrepreneurial/Economic Contributed Papers Podium Session Tuesday, March 31 , 8:30 am-10:30 am (0.2 CEU) 1. 8:30 am-8:50 am Economic Considerations for Evaluating Competitive Bids for Third Party Contracts. Dennis W. Raisch, Lon N. Larson, and J. Lyle Bootman, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721. 2. 8:50 am-9:10 am Alternative Practice Organizational Schemes: A Case Study. Stephanie Zakar, Norman A. Campbell, Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, and William Weinert, Garden State Pharmacy Owners, Inc., 156 Paris Avenue, Northvale, NJ 07647. 3. 9:10 am-9 :30 am A Study of Reasons Why Some Women Pharmacists Choose to Work in the Pharmaceutical Industry. J. S. Lear and K. W. Kirk, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin. 4. 9:30 am-9:50 am Teaching the Managerial Decisions and Economic Parameters of Buying a Community Pharmacy in an Elective Clerkship. D. K. Fowlkes, University of Arkansas, College of Pharmacy, Little Rock.

419 Entrepreneurial/Economic Contributed Papers Podium Tuesday, March 31 , 2 :30 pm-4:30 pm (0.2 CEU) 1. 2:30 pm -2:50 pm Mail:-Order Pharmacy Usage Pattern in a Veteran Population. A. G. Hartzema and J . H. Phillips, School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. 2. 2:50 pm-3:10 pm Perceived Relative Importance of National Environmental Factors to Multinational Pharmaceutical Companies. C. Annavadhana and J. P Gagnon, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

3. 3:10 pm-3:30 pm An Image Assessment of Retail Pharmacies Using Importance-Performance Analysis. A. Collins and J. P Gagnon, School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. 4. 3:30 pm-3:50 pm Ambulatory Care Centers: Prescription Drug Dispensing and An Industry Overview. Jan Hirsch Phillips, School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and C. E. Reeder, College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Columbia. 5. 3:50 pm-4:10 pm Effectiveness of Drug Utilization Review in Identifying Adverse Drug Reactions in an HMO. B. S. Jones, United HealthCare, Minnetonka, Minnesota. 6. 4:10 pm-4:30 pm Reorientation of Pharmacy Practice from Product Orientation to Service Orientation as Applied to a Community Practice. Dennis Bryan, WBC Pharmacies Inc.

506 Scientific!Research Economic, Social, and Administrative Sciences Contributed Papers Podium Session Wednesday, April 1, 9:00 am-noon (0.3 CEU) 1. 9:00 am-9:20 am An Examination of Flurazepam Ordering and Use in Selected Wisconsin Skilled Nursing Facilities. P. A. Robers, College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin, and B. L. Svarstad, School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison. 2. 9:20 am-9 :40 am Development of a Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire for Pharmacy Services. Linda D. MacKeigan, Nisha M. D'Souza, and Lon N. Larson, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721. American Pharmacy, Vol. NS27, No.1, January 1987/34

3. 9:40 am -10:00 am Use of the Job Diagnostic Survey (JDS) to Measure Job Attitudes of Students. M. E. Dean, College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago. 4. 10:00 am-10:20 am Comparison of Pharmacy Student and Practitioners Attitudes About Post-Marketing Surveillance (PMS). M. Nagasawa and B. F. Banahan III, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Mississippi. 5. 10:20 am-10:40 am A Comparison of State PAA Programs. E. W. Lingle and C. M. Kozma, College of Pharmacy, The University of South Carolina, Columbia. 6. 10:40 am-11 :00 am Pharmacists' Reasons for Using Average Wholesale Price in Prescription Pricing. D. H. Kreling, School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin, Madison. 7. 11 :00 am-11 :20 am Content Analysis of Selected Pharmaceutical Monographs in Commercial Drug Compendia: An International Comparison. A. M. Pleil, College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin, and D. S. Pathak, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus. S. 11.:20 am-11 :40 am Wholesaler Relations and Profitability for Pharmacy Shareholders in a PharmacyOwned Wholesaler. J. Thomas III, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907. 9. 11 :40 am-12:00 pm Hospitals' Policies on Pharmaceutical Sales Representatives' Activities: Findings from a National Study. J. Thomas III, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

The posters will be displayed Sunday, March 29,

Monday, March 30 and Tuesday, March 31 from 11 :00 am-3:00 pm. Authors will be present on the day noted from 1:00 pm-2:00 pm.

207 Contributed Papers Poster Session Sunday, March 29, 11 :00 am-3:00 pm. Authors present 1 :00 pm-2:00 pm.

P-14 A Prescript ion Cost Containment System Involving a Pharmacy PPO , In-House Family Practice Pharmacy and an HM O. Stephen W. Shearer, Robert E. Davis, W. Ray Bums, and Tim Thomas. P-15 Outcomes of an Ent repreneurism Seminar Developed for Pharmacy Students. R. S. Hadsall and J. M. Bouchard, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. P-16 Evaluation of Consumer Opinion of Prescription Drug Services from Community and Mail Order Pharmacies. B. L. Jones , K. B. Roberts and W. L. Fitzgerald, Jr., College of Pharmacy, University of Tennessee, Memphis. P-24 Noninvasive Method for Determination of Propylene Carbonate in Pharmaceutical Formulations Using Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectrometry. K. J. Hartauer, J. K. Guillory, College of Pharmacy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, lA, 52242. P-25 Identification and Quantitation of the Potential Degradation Products of Sodium Docusate. Nina Maron, Research and Development, Parke-Davis Canada Inc., Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. P-26 A Novel In Vitro Method of Measuring Transepidermal Water Loss (TEWL). L. M. Lieb, R. A. Nash, J. R. Matias, and N . Orentreich. St. John's University and Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science, New York, New York. P-27 The Effect of Stock outs on Patronage in Community Pharmacies. G. R. Donehew, College of Pharmacy, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico . P-28 Water Vapor Transport Across Plastic Films. M . J . Mulski and R. W. Wood, Pharmaceutical Development, Travenol Laboratories, Morton Grove, Illinois. P-29 Diffusional Characteristics of Highly Soluble Drugs at the Boundary Layer. Wei-Youh Kuu, G. Lenos and M. Prisco, Travenol Laboratories, Round Lake, Illinois. P-30 Stability, Toxicity and Anticancer Activity of Lipophilic Prodrugs of Investigational Anticancer Drug (NSC-278214). Timothy Chang, Tarun Mehta, Chemistry Division, Tegeris Laboratories, Inc. , Temple Hills, MD 20748.

(0.4 CEU)

P-l

P-2

P-3

P-S

P-9

Development of Evaluation Methodologies for a Community Pharmacy Residency Program. E. H. Clouse, T. S. Portner, J. A. Scoggin, H. A. AndersonHarper, College of Pharmacy, University ofTennessee, Memphis. Home Health Care: Versatility and Commitment are the Keys. A. V. Rozzi, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Boston. The Pharmacy Hospice Network Project. L. Oderda and I. Zuckerman, University of Maryland, School of Pharmacy, Baltimore. Dispensing Pharmacist Participation in Ambulatory Care Clinics. E. R. Farinas and N. J. Collie, Clinical Center, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland. Nationwide Survey of Career Plans for Academically Superior Undergraduate Pharmacy Students. M. D. Shepherd, College of Pharmacy, University of Texas, M. L. Henderson, College of Pharmacy, Ohio Northern University, R. A. Ohvall, College of Pharmacy, Oregon State University, and T. Moore, College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin.

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309 Contributed Papers Poster Session Monday, March 30, 11 :00 am-3:00 pm. Authors Present 1 :00 pm-2:00 pm.

(0.4 CEU) P-4

An Assessment of Medication Knowledge in Geriatric Patients. J. F. Johnson, M. B. O'Connell, M. Krause and M. Castro, Hennepin County Medical Center and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. P-5 A Drug Distribution System for Deinstitutionalized Mentally Retarded Citizens. Mary Lynn McPherson, Ilene Zuckerman, Ralph Small, Donald Fedder, University of Maryland, School of Pharmacy, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, 20 N. Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201. P-I0 A Study on the Effects of the Scrubby Bear "Handwashing Prevents Infection" Campaign Conducted by the National Cancer Institute Pediatric Branch. Scrubby Bear Foundation Inc., Washington, D.C. P-ll AmbulatoryPediatric Drug Utilization Review. R. Mangione, L. Rubin, B. Kay, St. John's University,

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Motrin is backed by Upjohn service.

The Upjohn commitment ... to research, to innovation, to Quality control ... is exemnlified Qy' MOTRIN Tablets (ibunrofen). MOTRIN Tablets pioneered a whole new class of pharmaceuticals ... opened a billion-dollar market. Your support of MOTRIN Tablets contributes to our ability to continue the search for the drugs of the future.

Motrin...the ibuprofen that supports the future of pharmacy Motrin builds traffic and sales. MOTRIN is a trusted name, more familiar to the consumer than almost any other prescription product. Many pharmacists report that customers feel more confident with a quality product. And the quality image that MOTRIN provides can transfer to your pharmacy, building traffic and sales. MOTRIN is still the most widely prescribed drug of its class, with 130 million prescriptions to date ... 130 million customers ... 130 million opportunities ... for you to provide professional services and other health care needs.

©1986 The Upjohn Company

J -5889

Service is an Upjohn tradition. Far-ranging, it includes: o Legal support for all Upjohn products, protecting the pharmacist as described in the Upjohn product catalog. o Medical and product information on a 24-hour basis. o Professional management programs for pharmacists. o Support for pharmacy schools and organizations. We invite you to be the judge of the services offered by Upjohn Representatives. They, too, have a tradition to maintain: to provide current information on Upjohn products and to be personally helpful to you in every way possible.

For a better future ... and for the customers satisfaction Dispense

~tri

ibuprofen A Century of Caring 1886'1986

Tablets

College of Pharmacy, Jamaica, NY; Schneider 'Children's Hospital ofL.!. Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, New York. P-17 Servicing Industrial Clinics from a Retail Pharmacy. P. L. Greenhaw. Smith Drug, Kansas City, Missouri. P-18 Economic Justification for the Provision of HospitalBased Nuclear Pharmacy Services and the Development of Shared-Service Agreements. D. L. Laven*and R. J. Schnieders, Nuclear Medicine Service, VA Medical Center, Bay Pines, FL 33504*, and Pharmacy Service, VA Medical Center, Tampa, FL 33612. P-19 The DesiKn and Evaluation ofTwo Patient Counseling Fixtures. Bill G. Felkey, Bruce A. Berger, School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. P-20 Factors Which Influenced Job Selections of the U AMS College of Pharmacy's 1986 Graduates. Jack R. McCormack, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Little Rock. P-31 Binding Efficiencies of Starch NF and Modified Starches in Low Water Soluble Drugs. J. I. Karr, P. K. Shiromani, J. F. Bavitz, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, Pennsylvania. P-32 A Comparison of Two Transdermal Diffusion Apparatuses. W. Ritschel and J. Kappes, College of Pharma~y, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. P-33 Synthesis and Metabolic Study of2-[(E)-I' - Propenyl(E)-2-Pentenoic Acid- A Major Diene Metabolite of Valproic Acid. Frank Abbott, Ronald Lee, and Andrew Acheampong, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. P-34 Adsorption Capacities of Anti-Diarrheal Substa~ces. Bharat J. Oza and Hridaya N. Bhargava, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Boston. jp-35 Liquid Chromatographic Analysis of the Antihypertensive Drug 3[4-[ 4-(3-Ethoxyphenyl)-I-PiperazinylJButyl-AminoJ-5,5-Dimethyl-2- Cyclohexen-l-one (I) in Plasma. C. L. WebbandM. A. Eldon, Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis, Pharmaceutical Research, Pharmacokinetics/Drug Metabolism, Ann Arbor, MI 48105. P-36 M..etoclopramide Disposition in Normal and Uremic Humans. M. R. Wright*,J. E. Axelson*, D. W. Rurak, G. H. McMorland, Y. K. Tam, B. A. McErlane*, R. Ongley, J. D. E. Price. Faculties of Pharmaceutical Sciences* and Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver; British Columbia Faculty of Pharmacy & Pharmacy Science, Alberta, Edmonton, Alta. P-37 Differences in Verapamil Absorption as a Function of Time of Day After Oral Tablet Administration. M. M. Battle, M. A. Eldon, and W. A. Colburn, Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis, Pharmaceutical Research, Pharmacokinetics/Drug Metabolism, Ann Arbor, MI 48105.

P-12

P-13

P-21

P-22

P-23

P-38

P-39

P-40 P-41

P-42

P-43

414 Contributed Papers Poster Session Tuesday, March 31,11:00 am-3:00 pm. Authors present 1 :00 pm-2:00 pm. (0.4 CEU) P-06 Clinical Services in a Community Pharmacy. C. S. Campbell, W. J. Morrison, D. Martin B. Bloodworth, J. R. McCormack, University of Arkansas College of Pharmacy, Little Rock. P-07 Osteoporosis: The Pharmacist's Role in Patient 38

P-44

P-45

Education. Elaine D. MacKowiak and Michael R. Jacobs, Temple University, School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Therapeutic Efficacy of Transdermal Nitroglycerin: A Meta-Analysis. S. L. Harms, M. T. Kelly, J. M. Garrard, and D. D. Hendel, Department of Social and Administrative Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Clinical Significance of Anti-CEA Monoclonal Antibody Imaging for Colorectal Carcinoma and Description of Multidisciplinary Team Approach. R. G. Carroll, D. L. Laven, B. Sinni, S. J. Harwood, R. E. Childress, S. T. Overturf, P. J. Goldner, and P. Ottoson, Nuclear Medicine Service, Veterans Administra tion Chemical and Nonproprietary Names for Pharmaceuticals. Kurt L. Loening, Chemical Abstracts Service, P.O. Box 3012, Columbus, OH 43210, Ruta Freimanis and Kathleen Taylor-Jenkins, United States Adopted Names Council, American Medical Association, 535 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL 60610. Cost-Containment and Quality of Care Strategies for Pharmacy Services and Drug Program Management in Organized Health Plans: A Literature Review and Activity Checklist. Linda D. MacKeigan, Lon N. Larson, and Nisha M. D'Souza, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721. Utilization of Drug Samples in a Family Practice Residency TrainIng Office. C. L. Stang, Department of Pharmacy, Norwalk Hospital, Norwalk, Connecticut. Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Quinapril and its Active Metabolite (CI-928) in Beagle Dogs. A. M. Horvath, J. J. Ferry, M. M. Battle, and W. A. Colburn, Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis, Pharmaceutical Research, Pharmacokinetics/Drug Metabolism, Ann Arbor, MI 48105. Pharmacokinetics of a 5 MG CI-926 Oral Dosage Formulation in Healthy Subjects. Donald M. Gibson, Michael Harris, and Ronald A. Jordan. W arner-Lambert/parke-Davis, Pharmaceutical Research, Pharmacokinetics/ Drug Metabolism, Ann Arbor, MI 48105. Drugs for Rare Diseases. L. C. Weaver, Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association, Washington, D.C. Professional Pharmacy Organizations Survey: Meeting the Needs of Members and Attracting Nonmembers. D. H. Berardo, and C. L. Kimberlin, Department of Pharmacy Health Care Administration, University of Florida, Gainesville. Gender Differences in Pharmacist Burnout. M. R. Lahoz and H. L. Mason, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. Medication Acquisition Costs for the Nebraska Medicaid Program. E. Jacobs, University of Nebraska, College of Pharmacy, Omaha. Acute Titration with Transderm-Nitro In Angina Pectoris: Nitroglycerin Treatment Revisited. Raj at K. Mahapatra, Kenneth W. Hunter, and Keith D. Stottlemyer. Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine and USAF Regional Hospital, Carswell AFB, Texas. Folk Remedies Among Ethnic Adults. Bernard Sorofman and Toni Tripp-Reimer, the Colleges of Pharmacy and Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242.

American Pharmacy, Vol. NS27, No.1, January 1987/38

Program-At-A-Glance

9am

House of Delegates

Second General Session

Student Second House of Delegates

Student Opening Session & Program

lO am

Educational Programming

Educational Programming

Educational Programming

Educational Programming

11 am

Noon

lpm

Educational Programming

2pm

Exhibit Hall Open 11 am-3 pm

Exhibit Hall Open 11 am-3 pm

Exhibit Hall Open 11 am-3 pm

• • • •

+Poster Sessions +Networking +Residency

+Exhibits

+Exhibits

Forum +Food Festivities

• Poster Sessions • Networking Residency Forum • Food Festivities

Exhibits Poster Sessions Networking Residency Forum • Food Festivities

3pm Opening General Session

4 pm

Educational Programming

• Keynote Speaker • Awards Ceremony

5pm Exhibit Hall Grand Opening & Reception

6 pm

5 pm-7 pm

Student First House of Delegates

Educational Programm ing

+

Second House of Delegates

Educational Programming

Student Awards & Reception

Banquet

+Reception +Dinner +Entertainment +Dancing

7 pm

until Midnight

8 pm Student Social until 1 am

American Pharmacy, Vol. NS27, No.1, January 1987/39

39