Developmental amnesic syndrome: Two case studies

Developmental amnesic syndrome: Two case studies

Abstractsfrom the 17thAnnualMeeting 79 ation for encodingeven in mild injuries.Furtherimplicationsof the precedingfindings,as well as the el%cacyof ...

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Abstractsfrom the 17thAnnualMeeting

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ation for encodingeven in mild injuries.Furtherimplicationsof the precedingfindings,as well as the el%cacyof using the TOMALwith this clinicalpopulation,will be discussed. Levick,W. R. Developmental Amnesic Syndrome: Two Case Studies.

There has been considerableclinical, research and theoreticalexaminationof acquired amnesicsyndromesparticularlyin adultsubjects.In recentyears a few detailedcase studies of acquiredamnesicsyndromein childrenhave been published.In contrastthere has been very limited discussionof the conceptof a developmentalamnesicsyndrome.This paper examinesthe conceptof a developmentalamnesicsyndromein the lightof two case studies. The casesCJ and GD, both n-year-old boys,are presented.Neitherhas a historyto suggest acquiredbraindysfunction.Detailedmemorytestfindingsarepresentedtogetherwithresults of more completeneuropsychologicalexaminationand assessmentof educatiomdattainments. CJ and GD present similar patterns of memory deficit on testing with relative preservationof immediatememoryspan and severeimpairmentin delayedrecall of verbal and nonverbalmaterial.Whilerecognitionwas in most cases significantlybetterthan recall it was still generallybelow average. CJ and GD also presentedwith similar patterns of behaviorproblemsbothnotablefortheiraggressiveanddestructiveclassroombehavior.They differedsignificantlyin globalmeasuresof intelligenceandin academicattainments.Results are comparedwithpatternsof memorydeficitin acquiredamnesicsyndromes.Possiblelinks betweenmemorydeficitsand othercognitivedeficits,educationalattainmentsand behavior are discussed. Finally the implicationsfor practice and theory in chikUdevelopmental neuropsychologyare considered. Lewis,J. K., Morris,M. K., Morris,R. D., & Foster,M. A. Social Problems Solving Ability in Children with Acquired Brain Injuries.

Childrenwith acquiredbrain injuries(ABI) have been describedas less sociallycompetent on parent report measures;however,there has been limited direct assessmentof specific socialskillsin thispopulation.Thisstudycomparedthirty-onechildrenwithABI, ages6-12, to31 controlsubjects,matchedon age, sex,andethnicity,on the SocialKnowledgeInterview (SKI),an analogmeasureof socialproblemsolvingskills.The majorityof ABI subjectshad experiencedeithera traumaticbraininjury(n = 12)or a braintumor (n = 15).Usingmatched pairs t-tests,severaldependentmeasureswere examinedincludingthe numberof possible responsesgeneratedfor eachproblemscenario,the qualityof thoseresponses,and the ability to select the best responsefrom a set of alternatives.Childrenwith ABI generatedmore assertiveresponsesthan matchedcontrolsand were less likelyto selectthe best responsein a multiplechoiceformat.A trendfor childrenwithABI to generatefewerpossibleresponses was alsoobserved.In bothgroups,performanceon theSKIwaspositivelycorrelatedwithIQ. In childrenwithABI,performancewas alsorelatedto medicalvariables(i.e.,primarylesion location,radiation treatment).Overall, results suggest that children with ABI may have greater difficultyin judging the appropriatenessof behavior than in generatingmultiple responseoptions.These findingshave implicationsfor the developmentof effectiverehabilitationstrategiestargetingsocialskillsdeficitsin brain injuredchildren. Lowther,J., & Wasserman,J. ADHD Subtyping with Neurocognitive Measures: Refinements to Mirsky’s Model.

Attention deficit disorders including DSM-IV Attention Deficit HyperactivityDisorder, Combined Type (ADHD) and Attention Deficit HyperactivityDisorder, Predominantly InattentiveType (ADD) rank amongthe most commonbehavioraldisordersof childhood. However,the neurocognitivecomponentsof attentionhave yet to be fully and definitively