Dining for Korean and hmong elders

Dining for Korean and hmong elders

MONDAY,OCTOBER22 POSTERSESSION:PROFESSIONALPRACTICE/COMMUNITYNUTRITIONAND PUBLICHEALTH TI'I'LI~: DINING FOR KOREAN AND HMONG ELDERS AUTHOR(S): S. L...

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MONDAY,OCTOBER22 POSTERSESSION:PROFESSIONALPRACTICE/COMMUNITYNUTRITIONAND PUBLICHEALTH TI'I'LI~:

DINING FOR KOREAN AND HMONG ELDERS

AUTHOR(S): S. L. DELANEY, RD, LD, VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA OF MINNESOTA

LEARNING OUTCOME: TO LEARN METHODS TO CREATE A SUCCESSFUL ETHNIC DINING PROGRAM C C ~ R A T I N G WITH MULTIPLE COMMUNITY AGENCIES

A B S T R A C T TEXT: Senior Nutrition Services of Volunteers of America of Minnesota (VOA) supports the nutritional needs of low-income seniors in the Minneapolis/St. Paul a~ea with a specific aim of increasing access of targeted minority communities to nutritious meals. The current presentation discusses the methods used to establish culturally appropriate senior congregate dining for Korean and Hmong elders. A downtown Minneapolis apartment complex with a large Korean population and a commercial kitchen was chosen. Initially, VOA worked with a Korean restaurant, and the Korean Service Center to provide catered meals three days per week. As participation increased, a Korean cook was hired and the program was expanded to five days per week with on-site cooking. The program is considered successful based, in part, on the increased participation of Korean elders, many of whom volunteer at the site. Hmong Senior Dining has been implemented in the Minneapolis and St. Paul metropolitan areas using a design similar to that above. Hmong Elder Connections and VOA developed sites in each city. Meals are brought in twice a week from a restaurant specializing in different types of Asian cuisine.

TITLE: TRENDS IN EATING FREQUENCY AND EATING TIME SPAN OF CHILDREN'S DIETARY INTAKES FROM 1973-1994: THE BOGALUSA HEART STUDY

AUTHORI(~):

A Linares ' ; TA Nicklas, DrPH ; T Baranowski, PhDI; C de Moor, PhD3; K Cullen, DrPH 1.3 1Baylor College of Medicine, 2University of Texas-School of Public Health, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. LEARNING OUTCOME: To understand whether the frequency of eating events and eating time span of children's intakes has changed over a two-decade period. ABSTRACT TEXT: Eating frequency and eating time span have been shown to impact biologic (e.g. plasma lipoproteins, glucose metabolism, plasma hormones) and nutritional outcomes (e.g. obesity, caloric density to energy intake, nutrient utilization); yet, very little is known in children. In an attempt to understand eating frequency in children's eating habits, 24-hour dietary recalls were collected on 1584 10-yearold children [65% Euro-American (EA), 35% African-American (AA)], in seven cross-sectional surveys from 1973 to 1994. An eating episode was defined as an eating event that occurred within 15 minutes from the time a previous food/beverage was consumed. Eating span was defined as the length of time from which the first and last food/beverage was consumed. Total eating episodes significantly decreased from 6.62 (1973-74) to 5.18 (1992-94) (p<0.0001); 25.5% of the eating episodes occurred before 11 a.m., 40.4% between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., and 36.1% after 4 p.m. Although there were no ethnic or gender differences in total eating episodes over time, AA had more eating episodes than EA before 11 a.m. (p<0.05); females (p<0.01) and AA (p<0.05) had more eating episodes than males and EA, respectively, between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. Eating time span significantly decreased from 12,65 hours (1973-74) to 11.56 hours (1992-94). Females (I0<0.05) and AA (<0.001) had shorter eating spans than males and EA, respectively. Additional work is needed to examine the impact of trends in eating frequency and eating time span on trends in weight status and dietary intakes of children.

Meals meet the requirements set by the Minnesota Board on Aging and include traditional Korean foods such as bulgoki, kimchee, and braised tofu. F~nong menus consist of vegetable broth, fruit, sticky rice and entrees such as sauteed bok ehoy with pork and beef or chicken laab.

TITLE: ETHNIC, AGE, AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN FOOD CONSUMPTION PATTERNS FROM CHILDHOOD TO YOUNG ADULTHOOD

AUTHOR(S): DK Demory-Luce, PhD, RD, LD ; E Owens, EdDt; A Linares, MI), MPH"2; TA Nieklas, DrPH I. 'Baylor College of Medicine; ~University of Texas-School of Public Health. LEARNING OUTCOME: To describe ethnic, gender, and age differences in food consumption patterns from childhood to young adulthood in a longitudinal sample, ABSTRACT TEXT: Changes in eating patterns may result when children make the transition from childhood to young adulthood. To determine food consumption patterns, 24hour dietary recalls were collected on 263 [68% Euro-American (EA) and 32% African American (AA)] 10-year-old children who participated in one of three cross-sectional surveys (1973-74; 1976-77; or 1978-79); and, again when they were young adults (1988-91; ages 16-24). At 10 years of age, AA consumed significantly (p<0.05) more breads/grains and poultry (p<0.01) than EA who consumed significantly more beef. Males consumed significantly more breads/grains (p<0.01), dairy (p<0.001), and condiments (e.g., ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, salt, etc) than females who consumed more fruit/fruit juices. When these same children were young adults, AA consumed significantly (p<0.001) more breads/grains and fruit/fruit juices (p<0.05) than EA who consumed more seafood, beverages (e.g., carbonated beverages, tea, coffee, koolaid, ere) (p<0.01), and condiments. Males consumed significantly (p<0.001) more fats/oils (p<0.05), breads/grains, beverages (p<0.01), seafood, snacks (p<0.05), eggs (p<0.01), beef (p<0.01), and alcohol than females. Significantly (p<0.001) more poultry, snacks (p<0.01), seafood, condiments, beverages, cheese, and beef (p<0.01) were consumed in young adulthood than at age 10. In contrast, significantly (10<0.001) less mixed meats (p<0.05), desserts, candy and milk were consumed in young adulthood than at age 10. The data suggest that food consumption patterns do vary by etlmieity, gender, and age, which have implications when designing nutrition intervention programs for target populations.

TITLE: TRACKING OF OVERWEIGHT STATUS FROM CHILDHOOD TO YOUNG ADULTHOOD AUTHOR(S); = M Juarez, BS ; E Owens, EdD A Linares MD, MPHL2; TA Nicldas, DrPH; T Baranowski, PhD~; Su-Jau Yang, MSk ~Baylor College of Medicine; 2University of Texas-School of Public Health. LEARNING OUTCOME: To track the prevalence of overweight status (BMI > 85th percentile) from childhood to young adulthood in a longitudinal biracial sample. ABSTRACT TEXT: Childhood obesity is an emerging public health problem. In an attempt to understand tracking in body weight from childhood to young adulthood, a longitudinal sample of 263 [68% Euro-American (EA), 32% African American (AA)] children was examined. Twenty-four hour dietary recalls were collected on 10-year-old children who participated in one of three cross-sectional surveys ( 1973-74; 1976-77; or 1978-79) and again when they were young adults (1989-91; ages 16-24 years). Body mass index (BMI) was used to determine overweight status according to the CDC standard ofBMI _ 85~ percentile. Change in BMI status from childhood to young adulthood was used to group participants into adiposity categories. For example the normal-normal (NN) group represented individuals with normal BMI at age 10 and as young adults. Twenty-one percent of individuals were overweight at 10 and 4 I% were overweight as young adults. Fifty-five percent were in the NN group; 25% were in the normal overweight (NO) group; 17% in the overweight overweight (OO) group; and 4% in the overweight normal (ON) group. For the NN group, there were significantly (p<.01) more EA than AA, and more EA females than the other race-gender groups. In contrast, there were significantly (p<.05) more EA females in the OO group than any other race-gender group. No significant gender differences were observed in mean BMI change (mean BMI change: 7.16) from childhood to young adulthood. However, the mean BMI change from childhood to young adulthood was significantly (p<.01) higher for AA (mean BMI change: 8.08) than EA (mean BMI change: 6.72). EA females had the lowest BMI change (6.46) and the AA females had the highest BMI change (8.33) from childhood to young adulthood. These findings demonstrate that a large percentage of children, particularly AA females, became overweight as young adults. Journal of THE AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION /

A-81