Effect of C-Trim as a Fat Replacer on the Physical, Textural and Sensory Properties of Chocolate Chip Cookies

Effect of C-Trim as a Fat Replacer on the Physical, Textural and Sensory Properties of Chocolate Chip Cookies

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 POSTER SESSION: SCIENCE/EDUCATION/MANAGEMENT/FOODSERVICE/CULINARY/RESEARCH TITLE: EFFECT OF C-TRIM AS A FAT REPLACER ON THE PHYS...

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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18

POSTER SESSION: SCIENCE/EDUCATION/MANAGEMENT/FOODSERVICE/CULINARY/RESEARCH TITLE: EFFECT OF C-TRIM AS A FAT REPLACER ON THE PHYSICAL, TEXTURAL AND SENSORY PROPERTIES OF CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES

TITLE: IN-SERVICE TRAINING AND PHONE CONTACT SERVICE IMPROVE COLLECTION OF PATIENT PREFERENCES IN A NONSELECT MENU FOODSERVICE OPERATION

AUTHOR(S): E. Woods; K.P. Navder, PhD, RD; Nutrition and Food Science in the Urban Public Health Program, Hunter College, New York, NY

AUTHOR(S): J.J. Oliver, M.L. Chamberlain, MS, RD, United States Air Force, Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland AFB, TX; J.L. Weinstein, MS, MBA, RD, United States Air Force, David Grant Medical Center, Travis AFB, CA

LEARNING OUTCOME: To determine the effectiveness of CalorieTrim a new fat replacer derived from oats and barley in chocolate chip cookies.

LEARNING OUTCOME: To evaluate two methods for improving collection of patient food preferences in non-select menu systems.

TEXT: C-Trim, a new beta-glucan-rich all natural fat replacer derived from oats and barley was unveiled in August 2005, and boasts five to ten times more soluble fiber than regular milled oats, flour and oatmeal. It is made with a selective thermo-shear processing technique which gives it more beta-glucans than earlier products like Nu-Trim and Oatrim. This functional oat-based ingredient has been developed to help improve people’s diets and lessen the incidence of obesity and diseases such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, cancer, and high blood pressure. In this study, a chocolate chip cookie formulation containing 50% fat (control) was prepared with 0, 33, 66, 75 and 100% fat replacement using C-Trim. Compared to the control cookie, all fat replaced cookies had decreased spreads, increased moisture contents, greater moisture losses, and higher water activities. Textural measurements made using the TA.XT2 Texture Analyzer (Texture Technologies Corp., Scarsdale, NY/Stable Micro Systems, Godalming, Surrey, UK) showed the fat replaced cookies to be more tough, more cohesive and less brittle as levels of fat decreased. Sensory properties evaluated by untrained panelists using a hedonic scale showed fat replaced cookies to be acceptable up to the 75% level. This study demonstrated that C-Trim can replace as much as 75% of the fat (by weight) in chocolate chip cookies, while yielding a healthy, acceptable, low-fat alternative that provides 45% less fat, 12% fewer calories and 100% more fiber compared to the control.

TEXT: Hospital foodservice seeks to provide adequate and acceptable nutrition options to optimize patient recovery and minimize hospital stay. Food preference information is an essential component to assuring acceptable food options are provided to patients in a non-select menu system. The objective of this study was to measure effectiveness of a diet technician training program and patient preference call line, both aimed at improving the collection of patient food preferences in a military trauma center. A preliminary survey of diet technicians found low compliance to current procedures for collecting food preferences. To improve the collection of food preferences, the project team developed two interventions. First, a 30-minute interactive employee training session aimed at reestablishing current procedures with technicians. Second, a pilot group of patients was provided a direct telephone number to dietary staff and encouraged to call with preferences. Completion rate was collected prior to training and repeated after training occurred. Telephone response rate was measured for patients eligible to phone in preferences. We found that focused training was effective at improving collection of preference data. The mean percentage of patients with completed food preferences significantly improved from 6.8% to 17.9% (p⬍0.0001). Surprisingly, only 3.6% of eligible patients participated by self-reporting their food preferences via the call-down line. In-service training is an essential component to assuring patient food preference data is collected. Despite poor participation, we believe self-reporting of food preference data via telephone, or other electronic means, offers a novel and potentially successful approach to collecting patient food preferences. FUNDING DISCLOSURE: None

FUNDING DISCLOSURE: None

TITLE: HACCP READINESS IN CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS: TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT AND RECORDING

TITLE: CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE OF PIZZA AND PIZZA CRUST MADE WITH WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR AND ADDED FLAXSEED

AUTHOR(S): C.B. Oakley, PhD, RD, FADA; M.M. Cody, PhD, RD; V.S. O’Leary, PhD; National Food Service Management Institute, University, MS, and Division of Nutrition, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA

AUTHOR(S): M. Montesano, M.W. Duffrin, K. Heidal

LEARNING OUTCOME: To understand the level of readiness of child nutrition personnel for measurement and recordkeeping of food temperatures required in HACCP TEXT: Information was gathered through anonymous surveys distributed to child nutrition personnel by program directors and returned to the researchers by participants. The sampling unit was the area defined by a public school district and included all child nutrition programs within the geographic range. Sample stratification was based on percentage of school lunches within the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food & Nutrition Service (FNS) Region. Responses were received from 1174 participants from 121 districts in 33 states, representing every USDA region. Participants self-reported working in Child and Adult Care Food Programs (75), Summer Food Service Programs (110), and/or the National School Lunch/School Breakfast Programs (1096). Most respondents reported that there were food thermometers in their work kitchens (87.7%), and responses were high (above 70% “always” or “most times”) for measuring temperatures of cooked meat, using thermometers to check storage temperatures, and cleaning/sanitizing thermometers after use. Thermometers were used less often to measure temperatures of hot foods other than meats (p⬍.000), measure serving temperatures than end-point cooking temperatures (p⬍.000), and measure serving temperatures of cold foods than hot foods (p⬍.000). About half of respondents reported “always” or “most times” recording temperatures. The most common supervisory actions related to inappropriate thermometer use or temperature recording were providing immediate feedback or doing nothing; recording infractions was uncommon. Thus, internal inspection reports and personnel records are unlikely to document training needs in thermometer use and recordkeeping, and it is important to stress HACCP components in training programs. FUNDING DISCLOSURE: This project was conducted by Georgia State University under FY2002 Cooperative Agreement, Internal Order No. 300150541A-100 (National Food Service Management Institute at The University of Mississippi).

LEARNING OUTCOME: As a result of this poster presentation, the learner(s) will be able to (1) State how flaxseed and whole wheat flour can be used to enhance the nutritional quality of pizza crust and (2) Identify pizza crust and pizza samples used in this study that were sensory acceptable to consumers. TEXT: The purpose of this study was to develop a mainstream food item with whole grains and flaxseed and test the consumer acceptability of the product. Pizza was chosen as the mainstream food item because pizzerias account for about 17% of restaurants in the United States. Four variations of pizza crusts made with varying levels of 100% whole wheat flour and flaxseed were made with the purpose of increasing the fiber and omega-3 fatty acid content in the food formulation. The pizza crust control was a standard food formulation from a local pizzeria that is made with high gluten flour. The variations that were compared to the standard food formulation included a crust made with added flaxseed, a crust made with added flaxseed and replacing 50% of the high gluten flour with whole wheat flour, and a crust made with added flaxseed and full substitution of the high gluten flour with whole wheat flour. The pizza crust and pizza samples were evaluated using untrained panelists (n⫽100) with a scorecard using a hedonic scale to measure sensory characteristics. Mean scores suggested that panelists preferred the pizza crust made with only high gluten flour. However, when the pizza was sampled with the toppings of pizza sauce and cheese, the consumers could not detect a difference in the crust made with high gluten flour and the crust made with high gluten flour and flaxseed. Study results are favorable towards the possibility of consumers accepting a pizza crust from a local pizzeria made with flaxseed. FUNDING DISCLOSURE: None

Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION / A-55