Effectiveness of Centralized Text Message Reminders on Human Papillomavirus Immunization Coverage for Publicly Insured Adolescents

Effectiveness of Centralized Text Message Reminders on Human Papillomavirus Immunization Coverage for Publicly Insured Adolescents

Journal of Adolescent Health 56 (2015) S17eS20 www.jahonline.org Original article Effectiveness of Centralized Text Message Reminders on Human Papil...

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Journal of Adolescent Health 56 (2015) S17eS20

www.jahonline.org Original article

Effectiveness of Centralized Text Message Reminders on Human Papillomavirus Immunization Coverage for Publicly Insured Adolescents Cynthia M. Rand, M.D., M.P.H. a, *, Howard Brill, Ph.D. b, Christina Albertin, M.P.H. a, Sharon G. Humiston, M.D., M.P.H. c, Stanley Schaffer, M.D., M.S. a, Laura P. Shone, Dr.P.H., M.S.W. d, Aaron K. Blumkin, M.S. a, and Peter G. Szilagyi, M.D., M.P.H. e a

Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York Monroe Plan for Medical Care, Rochester, New York Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri d Department of Research, Division of Primary Care Research, American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, Illinois e Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA, Los Angeles, California b c

Article history: Received July 11, 2014; Accepted October 14, 2014 Keywords: Human papillomavirus vaccines; Reminder systems; Text messaging; Adolescent health services

A B S T R A C T

Purpose: We evaluated a managed care organization (MCO)egenerated text message remindere recall system designed to improve human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage. Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial of text remindererecall for parents of 3,812 publicly insured adolescents aged 11e16 years with no prior HPV vaccinations who were enrolled in a single MCO and were patients at one of 39 primary care practices. We determined the rate of HPV receipt for intervention versus control with the KaplaneMeier failure function and determined hazard ratios using a clustered stratified Cox model, clustering on primary care provider and stratified on practice. We examined results for all subjects, and for those with a valid phone number, stratified by age group (11e13 years and 14e16 years) and gender. A post hoc analysis included all subjects and controlled for age and gender. Results: HPV dose 1 vaccination rates were not significantly different when all participants were included, but for the subset of parents (54%) able to receive messages, HPV dose 1 rates were 13% for the control group and 16% for the intervention group; hazard ratio, 1.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.0 e1.6; p ¼ .04), when controlling for age and gender. There were no significant findings in the analysis stratified by age and gender. Conclusions: MCO-based text reminders are feasible and have a modest effect on HPV dose 1 vaccination rates for those parents able to receive text messages with valid phone numbers in the MCO database. Future studies should examine a similar intervention for those parents who already accepted the first HPV vaccine dose. Ó 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

Conflicts of Interest: S.G.H. is a consultant to the not-for-profit, Immunization Action Coalition. None of the other authors reports any conflicts of interest. Disclaimer: Publication of this article was supported by the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine through a grant from Merck & Co., Inc. The opinions or views expressed in this supplement are those of the authors and do not represent the position of the funder. 1054-139X/Ó 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2014.10.273

IMPLICATIONS AND CONTRIBUTION

Centralized text message reminders from a public insurance managed care organization have a small but significant effect on increasing rates of the first dose of human papillomavirus vaccine for parents with working phones capable of receiving text messages.

Registered with Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01806714) on March 5, 2013. Sponsor: University of Rochester. * Address correspondence to: Cynthia M. Rand, M.D., M.P.H., Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Box 777, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642. E-mail address: [email protected] (C.M. Rand).

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Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been recommended for adolescent females and males since 2007 and 2011, respectively [1,2]. However, only 57.3% of female adolescents aged 13e17 years and 34.6% of male adolescents aged 13e17 years had received at least one dose of the vaccine in 2013, and rates have plateaued in female adolescents [3]. Practice-based remindererecall systems for vaccines due or missed have been shown to increase immunization rates [4e8] and have traditionally been done by mail or phone. Recently, text message reminders have been shown to improve childhood and adolescent immunization rates in a single urban setting [9e11]. However, only 16% of pediatric practices nationally use remindererecall systems [12]. Barriers to use of such systems include cost, competing demands, concerns about lack of completeness of immunization and contact records, and insufficient experience [13e16]. Centralized mail and phone remindererecall from a managed care organization (MCO) and a state immunization registry have been shown to increase rates of immunizations [17,18] and take advantage of economies of scale. Therefore, we conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT), based in a large MCO, to evaluate the effectiveness of a centralized text messageebased remindererecall system on improving rates of the first dose of HPV vaccination among low-income adolescents. We hypothesized that centralized textebased reminders would improve HPV immunization rates.

adolescent and excluded siblings. Patients were excluded if they transferred out of a participating practice or were no longer insured by the MCO during the study period. Intervention The MCO programmer reviewed vaccination data and sent text messages (up to four) to parents of eligible adolescents in the intervention group, using a third-party vendor who specializes in mobile communication. An initial notice informed parents that they were enrolled in a health message program from their child’s insurer: “MPHealth: Ur opted in 4 health messages frm ur child’s insurance [name of insurance plan] THX! Msg&Data Rates May Apply Text STOP to opt-out.” If participants did not opt out, a reminder for an HPV vaccination (MPHealth:‘Your [age] yr old is due for an HPV vaccine. Pls call [phone number and office name] to schedule an appt. Text STOP to opt-out)’ was sent. Parents of participants who received HPV vaccine dose 1 during the study and so were eligible for doses 2 or 3 (based on recommended intervals) also received messages for those doses. If a patient was not yet eligible for the next dose based on billing and registry data, no message was sent. The MCO received a report from the thirdparty vendor identifying whether text messages were received. Controls

Methods Setting The study was based at the Monroe Plan for Medical Care, a large not-for-profit MCO in upstate New York serving patients insured by Medicaid or the NY State Child Health Insurance Program. Members enroll in the MCO and are asked to update their contact information annually. Study design From July 2013 to March 2014, we conducted an RCT comparing text message reminders for HPV vaccination versus general adolescent health text messages, randomizing adolescents within each practice. Stata (Version 13.1; StataCorp, College Station, TX) was used to generate a randomization table. The study was approved by the University of Rochester’s Research Subjects Review Board. Participating practices We included 39 primary care practices (29 pediatric and 10 family medicine), each with more than 175 adolescents enrolled in the MCO from their practice. Practice managers received a letter on MCO letterhead notifying them of the intervention. Subjects The target population included adolescents aged 11e16 years enrolled in the Monroe Plan on July 1, 2013, with a primary care provider in a participating practice and with a phone number listed in the insurer’s database. Adolescents were eligible if they had no record of any HPV vaccinations in either billing data or the state’s immunization registry (NY law requires registry reporting of all vaccinations for patients aged less than 19 years). For families with multiple children, we randomly allocated a referent

Control group parents received the same initial message, followed by a control message about a different general adolescent health topic each time reminders were sent to the intervention group (e.g., ‘MPHealth: A healthy breakfast is associated with improved brain function, fewer missed school days, and improved mood for teens, Text STOP to opt-out’). Measures The main outcome was receipt of the first dose of HPV vaccine, but secondary measures included subsequent HPV vaccine doses (i.e., receipt of HPV vaccine doses 2 and 3). Analyses We determined the rate of HPV vaccine receipt for intervention versus control group patients from the time of the first message sent to the end of the study with the KaplaneMeier failure function. We determined hazard ratios using a clustered stratified Cox model with the Efron method to handle tied events and the Huber/White variance estimator that clustered on primary care provider and stratified on practice. We examined results for all subjects and separately for those with a valid phone number able to receive text messages, stratified by age group (11e13 and 14e16 years) and gender. Because our planned stratified analyses were limited by insufficient sample size, we performed additional post hoc analyses that included all subjects, but controlled for age group and gender. Results We sent messages to the parents of 3,812 adolescents (descriptive statistics shown in Table 1). Slightly more than half were male and were insured by Medicaid; 74% were seen in pediatric practices. Almost half had a phone number that never received health or reminder text messages because of a phone that was not able to receive texts or not in service (760 of controls

C.M. Rand et al. / Journal of Adolescent Health 56 (2015) S17eS20 Table 1 Demographics of adolescent participants

N Age, years 11 12 13 14 15 16 Male Insurance Medicaid SCHIP Practice specialty Pediatric Family medicine Residence Urban/suburban Rural Messages received 0a 1 2 3 4

Control, n (%)

Intervention, n (%)

1,919

1,893

407 380 324 288 270 250 1,051

(21.2) (19.8) (16.9) (15.0) (14.1) (13.0) (54.8)

428 341 307 281 271 265 1,030

1,123 (58.5) 796 (41.5)

1,118 (59.1) 775 (40.9)

1,428 (74.4) 491 (25.6)

1,392 (73.5) 501 (26.5)

1,143 (72.6) 431 (27.4)

1,112 (71.2) 451 (28.9)

Adolescent health

HPV vaccination

893 222 264 404 136

(46.5) (11.6) (13.8) (21.1) (7.1)

869 220 269 406 129

Table 2 Vaccination rate at the end of study period for subjects with valid phone numbers, by index patient sex and age groupa Vaccine

(22.6) (18.0) (16.2) (14.8) (14.3) (14.0) (54.4)

(45.9) (11.6) (14.2) (21.5) (6.8)

HPV ¼ human papillomavirus; SCHIP ¼ State Child Health Insurance Program. a Includes 133 control and 139 intervention participants who opted out after the introductory message.

and 730 of intervention) or opted out after the initial introductory message (133 of controls and 139 of intervention). During the study, 278 of controls and 205 of the group intervention opted out overall. Human papillomavirus vaccination rates When all subjects (with or without valid phone numbers) were included, there were no differences in HPV vaccination rates for any dose (15% of females and 14% of males in the control group; 14% and 16%, respectively, in the intervention group had 1 dose, data not shown). Similarly, when only subjects with a valid phone number capable of receiving text messages, who did not opt out after the introductory message were included in the stratified analysis (Table 2), there were no significant differences for any HPV vaccine doses (1, 2, or 3) for either gender or age group. In a post hoc analysis for all participants (i.e., all ages and both genders) with valid phone numbers who did not opt out after the introductory message, controlling for age and gender (Table 3), there was a significant increase of 30% in HPV vaccine dose 1 rates (13% of the control and 16% of the intervention group had received one dose). Discussion In this RCT of centralized MCO-generated text message reminders to the parents of adolescents due for the first dose of HPV vaccine, we found a 30% increase in the first-dose vaccination rates when the entire population with working phone numbers was included but no statistically significant increases in HPV vaccination rates for age and gender groups. One major challenge was that only half of our sample had a working phone number able to receive text messages, so that our stratified analyses, which showed no significant change in rates, had relatively small sample sizes.

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N

Control (%)

Females aged 11 to <14 years HPV dose 1 498 11 HPV dose 2 533 4 HPV dose 3 504 1 Females aged 14 years HPV dose 1 386 9 HPV dose 2 394 2 HPV dose 3 380 1 Males aged 11 to <14 years HPV dose 1 601 15 HPV dose 2 636 7 HPV dose 3 600 2 Males aged >14 years HPV dose 1 440 11 HPV dose 2 458 4 HPV dose 3 440 1

Intervention (%)

Hazard ratio

p value

13 3 1

1.3 (.9e1.9) 1.1 (.6e1.9) 1.9 (.8e5.0)

.20 .75 .17

11 7 1

1.1 (.5e2.4) 2.9 (.9e9.4) 2.8 (.6e13.7)

.72 .09 .19

20 8 2

1.3 (.9e2.0) 1.3 (.8e2.3) .6 (.2e2.5)

.18 .34 .51

13 3 1

1.3 (.8e2.1) 1.0 (.4e2.5) .9 (.2e4.8)

.32 .99 .89

HPV ¼ human papillomavirus. a KaplaneMeier failure function, hazard ratios from stratified Cox models. The models are stratified on practice and adjusted for standard errors by clustering on physician.

Studies show remindererecall is generally effective, yet few studies have examined HPV vaccine reminders specifically. We found a significant improvement in the first-dose HPV vaccination rates with remindererecall from the insurer for those with a valid phone number capable of receiving text messages. However, rates of one dose of HPV vaccine at the end of the study were 16%, compared to 13% in the control group, which is a modest improvement. Of note, these rates are lower than national averages because we selected only adolescents who had never received an HPV vaccine at the beginning of the study. A previous study of networked practices showed that parental telephone reminders were helpful for the second and third doses of HPV vaccine but minimally effective for dose 1 [6]. Our findings, combined with those from other studies [19], suggest that office-based interventions are also necessary to dramatically improve HPV vaccination rates [20], likely because of the issue of parental hesitancy to initiate HPV vaccination. Prior studies have emphasized the importance of a strong provider recommendation [20,21] so combining practice-based interventions with centralized reminders may be the most effective in increasing HPV vaccination rates. Because few practices implement remindererecall, centralized systems may be necessary to expand its use and reach Healthy People 2020 goals for adolescent immunization. Results from this and our prior study [17] show that MCO-based vaccine

Table 3 Vaccination rate at the end of study period for subjects with valid phone numbersa Vaccine

Male and female, aged 11e16 years

p value

N

Control (%)

Intervention (%)

Hazard ratio

HPV1 HPV2 HPV3

1,925 2,021 1,924

13 6 2

16 7 2

1.3 (1.0e1.6) 1.2 (.9e1.7) 1.3 (.7e2.6)

.04 .27 .43

HPV ¼ human papillomavirus. a KaplaneMeier failure function, hazard ratios from stratified Cox models. The models are stratified on practice and adjusted for standard errors by clustering on physician and has an independent variable for age (treated as categorical) and gender.

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reminders can increase immunization rates but only by a limited amount. In addition, parents are generally receptive to centralized reminders [22]. Although this study focused on the firstdose reminders, we postulate that once that dose of vaccine has been accepted, reminders for follow-up doses are more likely to be successful. Thus, future studies should evaluate methods to raise both HPV vaccine initiation and booster doses. Because immunization rates generally increase over time and most interventions on adolescent immunization rates have yielded only incremental benefits [16], we see the need for further RCTs which are better than other study designs in identifying the true impact of new interventions. Our study highlights the role of secular trendsdboth intervention and control groups had a more than 10% increase in rates of the first vaccine dose over the study period. Text messaging is a novel way for parents to receive health reminders and have been shown to be effective in improving rates of Tdap and meningococcal vaccine for adolescents [9] and in decreasing the time between HPV vaccine doses [11]. In addition, many parents are interested in receiving text message reminders from their child’s doctor [23]. However, health systems may be concerned about the need for parental consent to receive texts and transmission of electronic personal health information (ePHI). To avoid these concerns, we recommend obtaining consent for text message reminders at enrollment into the health system and not including ePHI in the message. Other options are to encrypt ePHI and require recipient authentication of the message. We expect that technology and security for texting in health care will continue to evolve as health systems realize its potential to improve communication. Limitations This study was conducted in a single MCO, which may limit its generalizability. Second, almost half of parents either did not have a phone capable of receiving texts or had a nonworking phone number. Although mail is more expensive, future studies could consider mixing an initial text message followed by a mailed reminder for those parents who are unable to receive text messages. In conclusion, we found a small but significant difference in the first-dose HPV vaccination rates for adolescents whose parents received text message reminders from their insurer for those parents with working cell phones capable of receiving text messages. Future studies should focus on raising the first-dose HPV vaccination rates even further and on follow-up doses to achieve full protection against HPV-related disease. Funding Sources Funding for this project was provided by the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM) under a grant to SAHM from Merck. This work was presented in part at a SAHM grantee meeting in Cincinnati, Ohio on October 15, 2013.

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