GENDER DIFFERENCES IN AUDITORY HALLUCINATIONS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN AUDITORY HALLUCINATIONS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

230 Abstracts / Schizophrenia Research 102/1–3, Supplement 2 (2008) 1–279 cinations in a community sample of adolescents. Psychol Med, 2002. 32(4): ...

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Abstracts / Schizophrenia Research 102/1–3, Supplement 2 (2008) 1–279

cinations in a community sample of adolescents. Psychol Med, 2002. 32(4): p. 619-27. [4] Del Beccaro, M.A., P. Burke, and E. McCauley, Hallucinations in children: a follow-up study. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry, 1988. 27(4): p. 462-5.

518 – GENDER DIFFERENCES IN AUDITORY HALLUCINATIONS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA Jose Carlos González 1 , Neus Herrero 2 , Beatriz Carrasco 1 , Eduardo Jesus Aguilar 1 , Carmen Leal 2 , Julio Sanjuan 2 1 Hospital Clinico de Valencia, Valencia; 2 Facultad de Medicina de Valencia, Valencia, Spain [email protected] Introduction: Gender differences in the clinical presentation of patients with schizophrenia have been well documented, yet few studies have investigated gender-related clinical differences of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia. We compared a group of men and women schizophrenics with auditory hallucinations (AH) in order to evaluate the possibility of characterizing relevant dimensions in this symptom between genders. Methods: The Psychotic symptom rating scale (PSYRATS) for auditory hallucinations was administered to 123 patients (86 men, 37 women) who met DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia with AH. Patients were also assessed about demographic variables, including age of onset and whether AH were persistent. Results: The results showed that women had greater scores in the dimension “beliefs re-origin” (p<0.034) of the PSYRATS, having a more delusional interpretation about the origin of voices, while men had more persistent AH (p<0.026) and an earlier age of onset (p<029). Conclusions: The findings of our study suggest that gender differences contribute to some dimensions of auditory verbal hallucinations despite the lack of more expected remarkable differences between men and women patients with schizophrenia. References [1] Rector NA, Seeman MV. Auditory hallucinations in women and men. [2] Schizophr Res. 1992 Sep;7(3):233-6. [3] Haddock G, McCarron J, Tarrier N, Faragher EB. Scales to measure dimensions of hallucinations and delusions: the psychotic symptom rating scales (PSYRATS). [4] Psychol Med. 1999 Jul;29(4):879-89. [5] Sharma RP, Dowd SM, Janicak PG. Hallucinations in the acute schizophrenic-type psychosis: effects of gender and age of illness onset. Schizophr Res. 1999 May 4;37(1):91-5. [6] González JC, Aguilar EJ, Berenguer V, Leal C, Sanjuan J. Persistent auditory hallucinations. Psychopathology. 2006;39(3):120-5.

519 – OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE SYMPTOMS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH BUT DO NOT PREDICT PSYCHOTIC SYMPTOMS IN PATIENTS WITH PSYCHOSIS Frank Van Dael, Lydia Krabbendam, Jim van Os Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands [email protected] Introduction: There is substantial comorbidity between psychosis and obsessive-compulsive disorder, but little is known about how obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) impact on the course of psychotic symptoms. The aims of this study were to examine (i) the association between OCS and psychotic symptoms, and (ii) whether OCS predicts the occurrence and persistence of psychotic and depressive symptoms. Methods: A sample of 708 patients with chronic psychotic illness was assessed with the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale (CPRS) on three occasions over 2 years (baseline, year 1 and year 2). Results: Cross-sectionally, obsessions, and to a lesser extent com-

pulsions, showed a dose-response relationship with positive psychotic symptoms, even when adjusted for depressive symptoms. (Obsessions: b=0.31, p=0.000; Compulsions: b=0.22; p=0.021). Neither obsessions nor compulsions at baseline predicted the development of positive psychotic symptoms between baseline and year1 or year 2 follow-up (Obsessions [year1]: b = -0.06; p=0.312; compulsions [year1]: b=0.004; p=0.959), when adjusted for depression and psychotic symptoms present at baseline. At baseline, there was no interaction between obsessive-compulsive symptoms and positive psychotic symptoms in its association with psychotic symptoms at year 1 and year 2 follow-up. Conclusions: Obsessions, and to a lesser extent compulsions are associated with psychosis cross-sectionally. Longitudinally, neither obsessions nor compulsions at baseline predicted the development of psychotic symptoms nor the stability of psychotic symptoms between baseline, year 1 and year 2 follow-up. References [1] van Os, J., et al., Strauss (1969) revisited: a psychosis continuum in the general population? Schizophr Res, 2000. 45(1-2): p. 11-20. [2] van Os, J., et al., Prevalence of psychotic disorder and community level of psychotic symptoms: an urban-rural comparison. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 2001. 58(7): p. 663-8. [3] Johns, L.C. and J. van Os, The continuity of psychotic experiences in the general population. Clin Psychol Rev, 2001. 21(8): p. 1125-41. [4] de Haan, L., et al., Obsessive-compulsive symptoms during treatment with olanzapine and risperidone: a prospective study of 113 patients with recent-onset schizophrenia or related disorders. J Clin Psychiatry, 2002. 63(2): p. 104-7. [5] Poyurovsky, M., C. Fuchs, and A. Weizman, Obsessivecompulsive disorder in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. Am J Psychiatry, 1999. 156(12): p. 1998-2000. [6] Reznik, I., et al., Obsessive-compulsive schizophrenia: a new diagnostic entity? J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci, 2001. 13(1): p. 115-6.

520 – OCD PREDICTS PSYCHOTIC SYMPTOMS IN THE GENERAL POPULATION Frank Van Dael, Lydia Krabbendam, Jim van Os Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands [email protected] Introduction: There is substantial comorbidity between psychosis and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but little is known about how OCD impacts on the course of subclinial psychotic experiences. The aims of this study were to examine the association between OCD and subclinial psychosis in the general population, and whether OCD predicts subclinial psychosis. Methods: A representative population sample of 7,076 participants was interviewed with the CIDI at baseline, 1 year later at T1 and again 2 years later at T2. Results: At baseline, OCD was present in 2.7% of the people with subclinical psychotic experience (OR=3.53; p=0.000), in 6.8% of the people with a psychotic symptom (OR=7.07; p=0.000), and in 13.1% of those with a CIDI-diagnosis of psychosis (OR = 22.1; p=0. 000). OCD at baseline was a strong predictor for a positive symptom of psychosis (OR = 13.03; p=0.000), even when controlled for any positive symptom of psychosis and non-OCD anxiety disorders at baseline (OR=6.3; p=0.000). On the additive scale, there was an interaction between OCD and the presence of a positive psychotic symptom at baseline in predicting the presence of a positive symptom of psychosis at T1 or T2 (B = 0.48; p=0.014). Conclusions: In the general population, OCD is associated crosssectionally and longitudinally with psychosis and the presence of OCD at baseline predicts persistence of psychotic symptoms over the 3-year follow-up. References [1] van Os, J., et al., Strauss (1969) revisited: a psychosis continuum