Global Advocacy for Physical Activity

Global Advocacy for Physical Activity

Public Health Forum 21 Heft 79 (2013) http://journals.elsevier.de/pubhef Global Advocacy for Physical Activity Sylvia Titze and Pekka Oja The Global ...

159KB Sizes 2 Downloads 30 Views

Public Health Forum 21 Heft 79 (2013) http://journals.elsevier.de/pubhef

Global Advocacy for Physical Activity Sylvia Titze and Pekka Oja The Global Advocacy for Physical Activity (GAPA) is an Advocacy Council of the International Society of Physical Activity and Health (ISPAH). GAPA’s aim is to increase physical activity globally and five core strategies have been identified to achieve this goal: 1. Dissemination of physical activity information and evidence, 2. advocating the development, dissemination and implementation of national physical activity policies, action plans and guidelines, 3. establishment of an agreed global physical activity and health charter, 4. advocating the capacity building and the development of workforce training initiatives, and 5. advocating the strengthening of regional networks and global collaboration. Those five core strategies make clear that the emphasis of GAPA and other global networks for the promotion of healthenhancing physical activity is on the information, socio-cultural, and the policy environment and not on behavior change on an individual level. GAPA like other global advocacy bodies develop documents to inform which principles and action areas should be taken into account to influence and unite decision makers in order to successfully increase health-enhancing behaviors on a population level. In the following we summarize the content of two publications by GAPA. The two documents are a very valuable source how to develop a solid foundation and set directions for the promotion of health-enhancing physical activity globally as well as on national, regional and local levels. ‘‘The Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action’’,

was published in 2010 (Global Advocacy Council for Physical Activity, 2010). It provides a framework to create sustainable opportunities for physically active lifestyles for all. A complementary document, ‘‘Non Communicable Disease Prevention: Investments that Work for Physical Activity’’, was issued in 2011 to guide countries choosing where to invest in actions aimed at increasing physical activity (Global Advocacy Council for Physical Activity, 2011). The Toronto Charter for Physical Activity is a call for action for all countries, regions and communities throughout the world to strive for greater political and social commitment to support health-enhancing physical activity. The proposed nine principles and four key areas are consistent with two key publications by the World Health Organization: Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health (World Health Organization, 2004) and Action Plan for the Global Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases (World Health Organization, 2008), however, with the focus on physical activity. In the Toronto Charter it is stated: Countries and organisations (these organisations include health, transport, environment, sport and recreation, education, urban design and planning as well as government, civil society and private sector) working towards increasing participation in physical activity are encouraged to adopt the following guiding principles: 1. Adopt evidence based strategies. 2. Embrace an equity approach.

3. Address the environmental, social and individual determinants of physical activity. 4. Implement sustainable actions in partnership. 5. Build capacity and support training. 6. Use a life-course approach. 7. Advocate for an increase in political commitment. 8. Ensure cultural sensitivity. 9. Facilitate healthy personal choices. Those guiding principles should be applied in four action areas for successful population change (Figure 1). Details about those four action areas are available at http://www.globalpa. org.uk/charter/ The complementary document to the Toronto Charter, ‘‘Investments that Work for Physical Activity’’, was issued in the context of non-communicable disease prevention. It is emphasised that while there is no one single solution to increasing physical activity, an effective comprehensive approach will be required with multiple concurrent strategies to be implemented. It identifies seven best investments for increasing physical activity at population level. 1. ‘Whole-of-school’ programs. Introduce policy that supports physical activity across multiple sectors

Develop partnerships for action

Reorient services and funding to prioritize physical activity

Implement a national policy and action plan for physical activity

Figure 1. Action areas – a framework

34.e1

Public Health Forum 21 Heft 79 (2013) http://journals.elsevier.de/pubhef

2. Transport policies and systems that prioritize walking, cycling and public transport. 3. Urban design regulations and infrastructure that provide for equitable and safe access for recreational physical activity, and transportrelated walking and cycling across the life course. 4. Physical activity and non-communicable disease prevention integrated into primary health care systems. 5. Public education, including mass media to raise awareness and change social norms on physical activity. 6. Community-wide programs involving multiple settings and sectors and that mobilize and integrate community engagement and resources. 7. Sport systems and programs that promote ‘sport for all’ and

34.e2

encourage participation across the life span. If these investments are applied at sufficient scale they can make a significant contribution to reducing the burden of non-communicable diseases and promote population health. They will also contribute to improving the quality of life and the environments in which we live. The value of GAPA and other global advocacy bodies is to demonstrate that the decrease of the health-enhancing physical activity behavior is a worldwide problem. Even more important GAPA provides for decision makers an evidence-based structure which principles are important, which action areas should be taken into account, and which settings have to be simultaneously approached in order to sustainably increase participation in physical activity globally.

To make this knowledge accessible many countries took the initiative and translated the documents. The ‘‘Toronto Charter for Physical Activity’’ is available in 21 languages, also in German. The German translation of the document ‘‘Investments that Work for Physical Activity’’ will be published soon. Die korrespondierende Autorin erkla¨rt, dass kein Interessenkonflikt vorliegt. Literatur siehe Literatur zum Schwerpunktthema. http://journals.elsevier.de/pubhef/literatur http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phf.2013.03.018 Ao. Univ.-Prof. Dr. Sylvia Titze, MPH Universita¨t Graz Institut fu¨r Sportwissenschaft Mozartgasse 14 8010 Graz, Austria [email protected]

Public Health Forum 21 Heft 79 (2013) http://journals.elsevier.de/pubhef

Summary The Global Advocacy for Physical Activity (GAPA) is an Advocacy Council of the International Society of Physical Activity and Health. GAPA’s aim is to increase physical activity globally. GAPA like other global advocacy boards develop documents - e.g. The Toronto Charter - and other measures to inform which principles and action areas should be taken into account to influence and unite decision makers in order to successfully increase health-enhancing behaviors on a population level.

Einleitung Global Advocacy for Physical Activity (GAPA) ist ein Komitee der Internationalen Gesellschaft fu¨r Bewegung und Gesundheit. GAPAs Ziel ist es, das ko¨rperliche Aktivita¨tsniveau weltweit zu erho¨hen. GAPA wie auch andere globale Kommittees entwickeln Dokumente – z.B. die Toronto Charta – und andere Informationsmaterialien. Diese werden entwickelt, um Entscheidungstra¨gerinnen und Entscheidungstra¨ger zu informieren, welche Leitsa¨tze und Schlu¨sselbereiche zu beru¨cksichtigen sind, um gesundheitswirksame ko¨rperliche Aktivita¨t auf Bevo¨lkerungsebene zu erho¨hen.

Keywords: Physical activity = Bewegung, Global call for action = globaler Aufruf, Toronto Charter = Toronto Charta

References Global Advocacy Council for Physical Activity, International Society for Physical Activity and Health. The Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call to Action. May 20, 2010 (date of citation: 14.02.2013), available at http://www.globalpa.org.uk/ charter/.

Global Advocacy Council for Physical Activity (GAPA), the Advocacy Council of the International Society for Physical Activity and Health (ISPAH), NCD Prevention: Investments that Work for Physical Activity. February 2011 (date of citation: 14.02.2013), available at http:// www.globalpa.org.uk/investments/. World Health Organization. Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health. May 2004

(Citation date: 14.02.2013), available at http:// www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/strategy/ eb11344/strategy_english_web.pdf. World Health Organization. 2008-2013 Action Plan for the Global Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases. 28.05.2008 (Citation date: 14.02.2013), available at http://www.who.int/nmh/ActionplanPC-NCD-2008.pdf.

34.e3