Handbook

Handbook

TIONAL MATERIALS Edited by S. A. Berkowitz, Reviews Editor Reports, audiovisuals, and other resources that nutrition professionals may use for referen...

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TIONAL MATERIALS Edited by S. A. Berkowitz, Reviews Editor Reports, audiovisuals, and other resources that nutrition professionals may use for reference or continuing education are designated "professional." Curricula, audiovisuals, and other materials designed for use with children in formal or informal education settings are list ed under "classroom." Handouts, diet plans, and other materials intended for education of patients ond the general public are categorized as "consumer education and counseling. " Inclusion of any material in this section does not imply endorsement by the Society for Nutrition Education. Evaluative comments contained in the reviews and summaries reflect the views of the authors when signed. This issue contains initialed reviews written by Teri Hall and Elaine Moquette, M.P.H. candidates in the School of Public Health, Nutrition, University of California , Berkeley, CA 94720. All unsigned reviews are the responsibility of the reviews editor.

Two of the author's conclusions are especially pertinent. The first is the finding that multifocal interventions. which include nutritional supplementation, health care, and educational stimulation, can have a significant and positive impact on school performance. In contrast. none of the studies demonstrated any positive effect of early nutritional supplementation on subsequent school progress. The second finding is that iron deficiency anemia (males with hemoglobin readings of 10.1 to 11.4 gml100 mil is an impediment to learning. but that the cognitive effects are reversible with iron repletion therapy. Summary tables about the studies are included in the Appendix. and edited copies of the papers mentioned are available from the UNESCO Nutrition Education Programme.

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MONOGRAPH

Nutrition and Educational Achievement, Nutrition Education Series issue 9. Pollitt. E .. 1984. From Nutrition Education Programme. Division of Science. Technical and Vocational Education, UNESCO. 7. place de Fontenoy. Paris. France. 42 pp .• softcover. free. This monograph presents a selective review of the literature on the relationship between nutrition. malnutrition. and educational achievement. The author has analyzed twenty-three studies in three areas: 1) 'the effects of early undernutrition on subsequent school progress. 2) the relationship between a student's current nutritional status and school progress. and 3J the educational effects of nutrition intervention programs such as school feeding. All but three of the reported studies were conducted in 3eveloping countries. Of the three exceptions. two examined the effects of iron deficiency anemia. and one correlated fasting with decreased performance. Because of the growing levels of poverty and hunger in the United States. this research has important implications for nutrition and health professionals in this country. VOLUME

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1985

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HANDBOOK

Nutrition and Handicapped Children: A Handbook for parents and teachers, Wellman. N., S. Rarback. L. Basch, and S. Biesman-Simons, 1984. From Dept. of Dietetics and Nutrition. Florida International University. Miami, FL 33199. 40 pp., $1. This handbook reviews the major nutritional problems of handicapped and developmentally delayed children, and offers parents and teachers and professionals many practical suggestions for dealing with these children. The following topics are covered: nutritional risk checklist; loss of appetite and under-

weight; overweight; vitamin supplementation; pica; allergies; nutrition and dental health; constipation; vomiting. diarrhea. and fluid loss; gagging and rumination; infantilism; disruptive mealtime behavior; food texture; diet and hyperactivity; and drug-nutrient interaction. The reading lists include books for parents. teachers, and professionals . as well as works covering feeding-skill development and general nutrition. There is a lot of valuable information in this small handbook . For example. the tendency of some care-givers to delay initiation of self-feeding and to maintain children on pureed "baby" foods too long is discouraged. And the coverage of overweight is very good; the emphasis is on slowing further weight gain. rather than on weight reduction. However, it might have been wise to include a stronger warning about the dangers of stringent weight reduction in growing children. Users might also have benefited from the inclusion of a daily food guide as a quick check for overall balance in their children's diets. Some controversial topics are briefly addressed; for example, there is a recommendation that vitamins and minerals should be obtained from foods rather than pills. and the authors mention that the Feingold diet has not been scientifically validated. However. the handbook does not address all of the many claims about food and disabilities that attract both parents and teachers. Because the handbook is not exhaustive and because it contains technical language. parents and teachers will find that this book is most effective when used in JOURNAL OF NUTRITION EDUCATION

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EDUCA TIONAL MATERIALS conjunction with counseling by a dietitian, nutritionist, or other health professional. RESOURCE GUIDE

The Resource Book of Nutrition Materials: A listing of the many nutrition materials made available to educators, health professionals, and consumers by the food industry, government, and related food associations, Lilly, G., comp., 1984. From Grace S. Lilly, Box 38070, Orlando, FL 32819-0070, 85 pp., spiral bound, $9.95. This handy resource guide lists many free and inexpensive materials available to educators for classroom use, and for distribution to parents and community groups. Listings are cross-referenced according to the following categories: basic nutrition and food science; special diets and health concerns; life-cycle nutrition; physical education and fitness; elementary school programs; recipes and menu planning; nutrition labeling; and audiovisual materials. The following thirteen food manufacturers and three trade associations are listed as sources for materials: Best Foods; Campbell Soup Company; General Foods; General Mills; Giant Food, Inc.; Hershey Foods Corporation; HuntWesson; Kellogg Company; Kraft; Libby, McNeill & Libby, Inc.; Oscar Mayer; Pillsbury; Quaker Oats Company, and the American Soybean Association; the National Dairy Council; and the United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association. The author includes a brief introductory statement about the focus and intent of each food manufacturer in supplying the materials, and also provides background information about the three trade associations. She is generally careful to point out the promotional titles that feature brand names or specific food items. Listings of materials are selective, not comprehensive, but addresses are provided so that readers can obtain complete listings. An interesting inclusion is the list of WIC materials available from General Foods in both Spanish and English versions. Thes~ were developed in conjunction with USDA, and the first 500 copies are free of charge. Giant Food is also heavily involved in consumer nutrition education, and materials developed by that company in conjunction with both USDA and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, are also mentioned here. Chocolate lovers will be interested to see the list of materials from Hershey Foods Corporation, following 114

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the disclaimer that "It is the opinion of Hershey Foods Corporation that chocolate can be a part of a well-balanced diet but it should be eaten in moderation and within caloric limits. Recent independent studies support this opinion." The second half of the guide is a reprint of the pamphlet "Nutrition Publications for the Consumer: A selected annotated bibliography," from the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, DHHS. This bibliography provides information on publications from various government agencies, including reprints from the FDA Consumer. This will be a useful reference for educators and health professionals who have limited budgets for purchasing nutrition education materials. The author has included recommendations and has designated the appropriate audiences for each publication from the following list: educators, adult groups, grades, family life-cycle classes, child development classes, health and physical education classes, special diets, and general consumer. By providing background information about the manufacturers, the author encourages users to critically evaluate the listed materials. RESOURCE PACK

The UNESCO Resource Pack for Nutrition Teaching-Learning: An introduction to volume I, Nutrition Education Series issue 8, Van der Vynckt, S., and E. Barclay, eds., 1984. From UNESCO, Division of Science, Technical and Vocational Education, 7, place de Fontenoy, Paris, France, 81 pp., softcover, free. Also available: Easy to Make Teaching Aids for Nutrition TeachingLearning, Nutrition Education Series issue 10, Barclay, E., and S. Van der Vynckt, eds., 1984, 138 pp., softcover, free. UNESCO is currently compiling a fivevolume resource pack for nutrition teaching-learning, with contributions from nutrition educators, organizations, institutions, and government agencies throughout the world. The focus is on participatory teaching-learning-to provide students, teachers, parents, and community members with opportunities to increase knowledge and gain skills that they can apply in their daily lives. The planned volumes are as follows: volume I, UNESCO Sourcebook for Classroom Nutrition Teaching-Learning; volume II, UNESCO Sourcebook for Non-Formal Out-of-School Nutrition Teaching-Learning; volume III, UNESCO Sourcebook for Training in Nutrition

Teaching Methods; volume IV, Easy-toMake Teaching Aids; and volume V, World- Wide Directory of Nutrition Teaching-Learning Resources. Selected materials from volumes I and IV are contained in these recent issues from UNESCO's ongoing nutrition education series. Judging from the quality and variety of materials represented here, the final product will become an indispensible resource for nutrition and health educ~tion around the world. The materials, techniques, and ideas are suitable for both formal and informal educational settings; and the possible applications are myriad. Sample lesson plans in issue 8 illustrate the integration of nutrition into the regular school curriculum. Those of us who have worked with NET projects are familiar with its approach, and I am pleased to see it being promoted here. The teaching aids in issue 10 were collected from many countries, and include selections in the following areas: flannel boards and flannel graphs, flipcharts, flash cards, posters, bulletin boards, chalkboards, cardboard boxes, educational games, puzzles, drama, demonstrations, and tools for teaching aids. The illustrations reflect the country of origin, and can be used for multicultural lessons in addition to conveying health and nutrition information. This resource pack is still being developed and fieldtested, and nutrition educators are encouraged to contact UNESCO to participate in the process. In the meantime, these sample materials are well worth obtaining and using. REPORT

U.S. Sweetener/Sugar Issues and Concerns, Comptroller General, U.S. General Accounting Office, 1984. From GAO Document Handling and Information Facility, Box 6015, Gaithersburg, MD 20760, 43 pp., softcover, first five copies free. According to a report released by the Comptroller General in November 1984, America is producing and consuming less sugar. The General Accounting Office presented this report to assist Congress in debating the U.S. sugar price-support program as part of the 1985 Farm Bill. Health professionals interested or involved in U.S. agricultural policy (domestic and international) may find this report useful. The information is presented in six chapters covering the status of sweetener use in the U.S., the VOLUME

17

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3

1985