II tumore cronico di milza da tubercolosi cronica polmonare. (Reperti anatomo-patologici ed istologici)

II tumore cronico di milza da tubercolosi cronica polmonare. (Reperti anatomo-patologici ed istologici)

A u g u s t , 1934] PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS Abstracts. PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS. CECCHIEEI, E. Rieerea statistics e studio sull' amiloidosi gastrica ne...

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A u g u s t , 1934]

PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

Abstracts. PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS. CECCHIEEI, E. Rieerea statistics e studio sull' amiloidosi gastrica nei tubercolosi pulmonari. _Pathologies, 1933, 25, 191. The author illustrates the rarity of amyloid disease of the stomach in chronic pulmonary tuberculosis by the fact .that out of 55 cases of chronic caseous or ulcerative pulmonary tuberculosis in which chronic inflammatory gastric lesions were almost constant, only three showed chronic ainyloidosis of the gastric wall, the lesions being principally locali.,ed in the glandular layer of the mucous membrane. Although gastric amyloidosis may b e accompanied by amyloid disease of other organs, it is by no means an indication of generalised amyloidosis. BETTINI, D. I1 tumore eronico di milza da tubereolosi cronies polmonare. (Reperti anatomo-patologici ed istologici). ]?iv. di. .Patol. e 6'l/m della Tubercoloai, 1932, '1, ')37. The author who ~:ecords his findings in 15 cases remarks that tim inflammatory and degenerative changes in the spleen presen~ in chronic pulmonary tuberculosis may be associated in some cases with specific lesions containing tubercle bacilli which are very limited in extent and so may readily escape naked-eye examination. The importance of these lesions may be considerable in diminishing the normal defensive powers of the organism owing to their aggravating the inflammatory and degenerative processes produced by pulmonary tuberculosis in t h e spleen. HOMANO, S. Considcrazioni cliniche su un case di morte cardiaca improvvisa a distanza dall' intervento in un operate di frenicoexeresi. Sanatorium, 1933, 4, January, 1. The author records the c a s e of a man, aged 20, the subject of pulmonary tuberculosis, with sub-total infiltration of the upper lobe and a sub-clavicular cavity on tbe r i g h t s i d e as well as infiltration of the left apex. :Right phrenicectomy was performed and the lesions rapidly underwent a fibroid change. The operation was followed by slight dyspnoea on effort and accentuation of

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the second pulmonary sound. Seventeen months after the operation sudden death took place from acute cardiac insufficiency. The author attributes the death mainly to fibrosis of the tuberculous process and also draws attention to the injurious effect of paralysis o[ the right half of the diaphragm. LECUYER,. a. hi. Laryngite tuber. culeuse et collapsothOrapie pulmonaire. Th~se de .Paris, 1933, :No. 98. This thesis contains the histories of 108 Cases of pulmonary tuberculosis, which are divided into two groups. The first consisted 0f 50 cases which had laryngeal lesions before collapse treatment was instituted. The methods used were artificial pneumothorax !n 40, artificial pneumothora x combined with phrenieectomy in 6, phrenicectomy~also in 3, phrenicectomy and apieolysis in 1. The second group consisted of 58 cases which had nb laryngeal lesions and therefore underwent collapse treatment as a prophylactic measure. The results were as follows : In the first group the laryngeal lesions were cured in 12 cases, showed improvement in 12, remained unaffected in 11, and became worse in 15. Of the 58 cases treated prophylactically by collapse therapy only 1l subsequently developed laryngeal lesions, in other words the results were good in 80 per cent. MONTAGUE, E.A. :Early Pulmonary Tuberculosis. Medical .B~dletin of tl~c Veterans' Admin{stratiolz, 1933, 9, 305. Montague believes that the most important; factor in the early recognition of this disease, and one which is often the key to the situation, is a carefully taken history. All questions should /ae worded so as not to put a probable answer in the patient's mind. Another important point is to ascertain whether a diagnosis of any previous illness was probably correct, particular attention being paid to all respiratory diseases and to typhoid, malaria and syphilis, to undulant fever with symptoms of weakness and loss of weight. When possible, corroborative laboratory findings of these diseases should be obtained. The patient should be carefully questioned with regard to his occupation. Patients with e a r l y