In vivo and in vitro antifungal effectiveness of essential oils: working group activity report 2006–2012

In vivo and in vitro antifungal effectiveness of essential oils: working group activity report 2006–2012

Poster Presentations / European Journal of Integrative Medicine 4S (2012) 124–201 role in terms of food but especially for the relational and emotion...

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Poster Presentations / European Journal of Integrative Medicine 4S (2012) 124–201

role in terms of food but especially for the relational and emotional rehabilitation of detainees. In Gorgona, healing passes through the mediation of the animals that received homeopathic remedies and returns balance to the prisoners, who, in turn, are in contact with homeopathy, its meaning and its effects. The approach to the concept of holistic health homeopathy allowed us to address the real causes of diseases and their removal.. The animal presence in Gorgona allows one to deal directly and completely with the ’animal question’. An ethical question is now raised. Is it possible to reconcile the interests of animals, considered ‘sentient beings’, with those of humans? For example, it is important to remember the controversial imminent transposition of Directive 2010/63 of the European Parliament on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes by Italy, which is a European Union member state. Homeopathy, for epistemological status, does not use animals in clinical trials but only healthy human volunteers (homeopathic provings).A ’Charter for Animal Rights of Gorgona’ was recently drafted to start reflecting on this situation. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eujim.2012.07.861 PP-102 Acupuncture treatment of pseudo-pregnancy in a female dog: a case report Beni Andrea Scuola di Agopuntura Tradizionale della Città di Firenze, Florence, Italy False/pseudo-pregnancy, or pseudocyesis, is a paraphysiologic process that occurs in female dogs. It is not associated with reproductive organ disorders. It can be seen at 45–60 days after a normal oestrous (heat) period. Dogs may exhibit mothering of toys, nesting or even aggression. Mammary development and milk production are common. This may take a few weeks. Behavioural changes such as aggression, or extreme agitation or physical problems such as mastitis may need to be addressed. Drug intervention may be useful in these cases. These drugs need to be prescribed by a veterinarian and include cabergoline or others. In these cases, acupuncture is perceived as a safe and effective treatment; in many cases, it rapidly reduces physical and psychical symptoms. The case report presented is a ‘very successful’ case with an exceptional resolution (with only one treatment) of hypertrophy of the mammary glands. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eujim.2012.07.862

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PP-103 In vivo and in vitro antifungal effectiveness of essential oils: working group activity report 2006–2012 Nardoni Simona, Pisseri Francesca, Pistelli Luisa, Leonardi Michele, Mugnaini Linda, Guidi Grazia, Mancianti Francesca, Pinto Laura University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Background: Many studies have demonstrated that extracts from aromatic plants traditionally used in popular medicine exert antiseptic and inhibitory activities upon filamentous fungi and yeasts. The therapeutic use of essential oils (EOs) in veterinary medicine is still poorly substantiated by evidence-based studies, being mainly based on anecdotal experiences of veterinarians, aromatherapists and pet owners. Aim: A summary of the activity of the working group on natural compounds since 2006 to the present is reported here. Methods: The antifungal effectiveness and the chemical composition of EOs from some Mediterranean autochthonous plants were investigated against zoophilic dermatophytes such as Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. equinum (Thymus serpillum, Origanum vulgare, Rosmarinus officinalis, Illicium verum and Citrus limon) and Malassezia pachydermatis (Anthemis nobilis, C. limon, C. paradisi, I. verum, Lavandula hybrida, Mentha piperita, O. vulgare, R. officinalis, Salvia sclarea and T. serpillum). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum fungicidal activity (MFC) values were assessed by a microdilution test. O. vulgare and T. serpillum showed the lowest MIC/MFC values. Antifungal activity was putatively related to the chemical composition of the different compounds. On the basis of in vitro results and of dermatological properties known from the literature, a mixture composed of 5% O. vulgare, 5% R. officinalis and 2% T. serpillum, in sweet almond (Prunus dulcis) oil, was administered to 18 sheep with ringworm due to T. mentagrophytes, 14 horses diagnosed with T. equinum and seven cats affected by M. canis, while a mixture composed of A. nobilis 1%, R. officinalis 0.75%, M. piperita 0.5% and L. hybrida 0.5% was used to treat six dogs and three cats with otitis due to M. pachydermatis. Results: After treatment, animals with dermatophytosis recovered both clinically and aetiologically, while pets with otitis showed a very good clinical improvement. Conclusion: The effectiveness, manageability and pleasant organoleptic properties of tested EOs make them advisable as promising new natural antifungal drugs in the management of superficial mycoses of animals, as well as potential eudermic and anti-inflammatory properties. Furthermore, the use of phytotherapy in treating superficial mycoses seems to be preferable for the lower environmental impact, decrease in pharmacoresistance, reduced treatment costs and zoonotic risk reduction. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eujim.2012.07.863