Introduction to Bacteria, 2nd edition

Introduction to Bacteria, 2nd edition

78 Book rev#ws material, with a good index for easy access to the contents. It is therefore recommended for a scientific or university library, or f...

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78

Book rev#ws

material, with a good index for easy access to the contents. It is therefore recommended for a scientific or university library, or for someone within the composite industry. Charles J. Knill John F. Kennedy

Introduction to Bacteria, 2nd Edition. Edited by Paul Singleton, John Wiley & Sons, 1992. 232 pp. Price £11.95. ISBN 0471931462. Bacteria are often thought of as pests to be destroyed. However, many of their activities are important not only to man but also to the whole balance of, nature. Microbial technology is becoming one of the most important growth points in industry, and its significance will be increasingly apparent as supplies of traditional raw materials and energy sources become depleted. With the advent of novel genetic manipulation techniques, it is now theoretically possible to design a microorganism to carry out almost any specific biological task. Industrial interest in microbial polysaccharides has been stimulated by their unique properties and the opportunity to provide a guaranteed supply of material of constant quality and stable prices. Microbes give rise

to many polysaccharides and also to macromolecules, such as glycopeptides, glycoproteins and glycolipids, which provide a 'backbone' to which carbohydrate chains can attach. Extracellular polysaccharides secreted by bacteria provide a new range of polymers with interesting functionalities for use by the food and agricultural industries. Lipopolysaccharides, which are biologically some of the most significant components of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacterial cells, are responsible for type-specific immunological reactions and are currently the centre of considerable research activity. 'Introduction to Bacteria' is primarily intended as a guide for students of Biology, Biotechnology and medicine, and provides a comprehensive study of this subject. Initial chapters deals with the 'core' aspect of bacteriology structure, growth, differentiation, metabolism and molecular biology. Applied bacteriology is also presented, as well as some practical aspects of bacteriology such as; classification, identification, disinfection, sterilisation and others. The Appendix, giving essential features of 70 bacteria mentioned in the text, is provided for the rapid orientation of the reader. In conclusion, this is a very comprehensive and valuable pedagogic book containing the information that students are expected to learn. John F. Kennedy Zilda M. B. Figueiredo