Jan bart le poole (1917–1993)

Jan bart le poole (1917–1993)

sf electrsn mic:sscopy, passed away. As an undergraduate in the 2ppEied physics department of Delft University, he had already become fascinated by eb...

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sf electrsn mic:sscopy, passed away. As an undergraduate in the 2ppEied physics department of Delft University, he had already become fascinated by ebxtron optics. In 1939 he convinced his grofessm that buifding an efectrora microscqxwould be a good project for his Master’s thesis, and in 1941 the first pictures were r&en. By then the Second Worfd War had made commzmunicationswith the rest of the world very difficult, wlsich meant that Le Poole, having been given the j& of buikkg a Mark II _microscope and promoting research witk it, was akmst (9x2his own unrii the German occupation, of tke Netherlazids was Med. WIren he dkcsvered that his instrument, with features Iike a diffmzion lens and a wobbler, compared favorabiy to other imtruments, he convinced the mirips company to make electron microscqxs a product. This inithlive and, sf curse, his role in the design of the EM iLOO,EM75, EM280, EM300 and EM400 (e.g. irmthe twin-tens des2gn) have influenced electron. mkrsscopists al! over the world. In 1957, Le PO& was ap~oinned to a professorship 2t DeXt University :o wurk in the field of charged

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desfgned ir, tt;e Mowing 25 years ranged 5-tm X-ray projection microscopes and time-of-flight mass spectrometers to electron and ion Iithograpit,y machines. Xn ahe field of eIeetroP, ?nsicrosco~y it is worth xleatloning hi8 desi&n of the minilens, his work cm a Wien-fhx for energy-filtered imaging and energy loss s~eclroscopy (1970!!, his design af a scanning mirror microscope, and his very compacr 1 MV electron xkroscope.

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Jan Burt Le Poole (1917-1993)

Jan Bart Le Poole was the organizer of the first international conference on electron microscopy in 1949. He was the founder of the Dutch Society for Electron Microscopy and a co-founder of the International Federation of Societies for Electron Microscopy, where he later served as General Secretary and as President. Those of us who have known Le Poole personally often recall his influence. His penetrating questions at conferences forced both speaker and audience to think and reconsider. His way of teaching was very uplifting: he tried to convince students that they knew enough to solve almost any technical problem; it was just a question of applying their knowledge correctly. I hope that the fact that so many people all over the world remember Jan Bart Le Poole with fondness and respect is a comfort to his wife and children. Pieter

Kruit