Language status in children with normal language development and children suffering from specific language impairment

Language status in children with normal language development and children suffering from specific language impairment

S32 Poster Abstracts / Brain and Cognition 67 (2008) S11–S47 hand in advance, while left-handers and children may not to the same extent. Clearly, b...

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S32

Poster Abstracts / Brain and Cognition 67 (2008) S11–S47

hand in advance, while left-handers and children may not to the same extent. Clearly, both task complexity and object type appear to be factors that individuals use in determining limb selection during reaching tasks.

Tense and agreement in Spanish agrammatic production Karen L. Miller Department of Spanish, Calvin College, 3201 Burton Street, 410 Hiemenga Hall, Grand Rapids, MI 49506, USA E-mail address: [email protected]

Acknowledgment The authors acknowledge NSERC (PJB). doi:10.1016/j.bandc.2008.02.062

Language status in children with normal language development and children suffering from specific language impairment Vesna Mildner, Ana Vidovic Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb, I. Lucica 3, Zagreb, HR 10000, Croatia E-mail address: [email protected]ffzg.hr (V. Mildner) Specific language impairment (SLI) is a developmental language impairment of unidentified (presumed hereditary) etiology. The general development of children suffering from SLI is neat and harmonious: They have no hearing problems; their motor, emotional, social and cognitive development is in accordance with their age. Children suffering from SLI present with no neurological impairment, but this does not mean that the cause of their difficulties is not in the central nervous system. Their language development is delayed but it is also different than in their peers. The aim of this study was to analyze the speech of Croatian children suffering from SLI, and compare it with the speech of children with normal language development (NLD). The analysis was based on their ability to repeat 14 sentences differing in length and level of complexity, and the ability of narration (retelling), based on the mean length of utterance and the number of verbs used in the narrated text. Two girls and three boys suffering from SLI and two girls and three boys with NLD were studied. All subjects were five years old. The SLI children were less successful in repeating the sentences than the control group, especially when repeating grammatically more complex sentences. The SLI children were also less successful in retelling the story, which was manifested as considerably shorter length of utterance and a smaller number of verbs used in the narrative text. Acknowledgments This study was carried out within the project Neurolinguistic aspects of bilingualism, financed in part by the Croatian Ministry of Science, Education and Sports. doi:10.1016/j.bandc.2008.02.063

This study examines patterns of verbal tense and agreement errors in the production of two Chilean Spanish-speaking patients with agrammatic aphasia. Four types of narratives (free speech, picture description, picture sequence, reading) were collected using a methodology proposed by Menn and Obler. In addition, subjects participated in an elicitation task that tested their ability to inflect for verbal tense and agreement features. The overall findings show that Spanish agrammatism parallels agrammatism in other languages, in that it involves similar basic production parameters but it also shows different language-specific characteristics. The findings also indicate that agreement is intact while tense morphology is impaired in both subjects. These findings are discussed in light of two models of language breakdown: The tree-pruning hypothesis and the Competition Model. doi:10.1016/j.bandc.2008.02.064

Reliable mismatch negativity event-related potentials for tones presented with a concurrent video soundtrack Patricia Moreau a,b, Isabelle Peretz a,b, Pierre Jolicoeur b, Nathalie Gosselin a,b a

BRAMS (Brain, Music and Sound), University of Montreal, 1420 Mont-Royal, Montreal, Que., Canada H3C 3J7 b CERNEC (Centre de Recherche en Neuropsychologie et Cognition), University of Montreal, C.P. 6128 succ. CentreVille, Montreal, Que., Canada H3C 3J7 E-mail address: [email protected] (P. Moreau) The mismatch negativity (MMN) is typically elicited in non-attentive conditions where the subject is, for example, asked to watch a subtitled silent movie and ignore the auditory stimulation. To make the experiment more convenient, in some studies, listeners have been allowed to watch a video with the soundtrack while their event-related potentials (ERP) to the auditory stimuli were recorded. However, the effect of such a procedure has not been explored extensively (1). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the soundtrack during the recording of the auditory MMN. Ten students were instructed to ignore the standard (1047 Hz) and deviant tones (880, 1017, 1077 and 1245 Hz) while they watched a video either with the soundtrack or in silence with subtitles. After the MMN recording, subjects continued watching the video in the silent condition while being exposed to