Modern Pharmaceutics, 2nd edition

Modern Pharmaceutics, 2nd edition

328 cilitate the overall effort of the drug development process. KENNETH J. HIMMELSTEIN Allergan Irvine, CA, U.S.A. G.S. Banker and C.T. Rhodes (Edi...

81KB Sizes 19 Downloads 179 Views

328

cilitate the overall effort of the drug development process. KENNETH J. HIMMELSTEIN Allergan Irvine, CA, U.S.A.

G.S. Banker and C.T. Rhodes (Editors), Modern Pharmaceutics, 2nd edition, Marcel Dekker, New York, NY, 1989, $125.00. The first edition of this book has already become a classic text in the pharmaceutical field. This second edition is an expanded, updated, excellent book which I would heartily recommend to anyone with an interest in drug performance, analysis, or formulation. The introduction of the book may best describe this volume, which indeed “couples the disciplines of biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, and physical pharmacy with pharmaceutical technology to provide, in one, well cross-referenced text, the information necessary for a thorough understanding of modern pharmaceutical dosage forms”. The twenty-two chapters in this text are all written by different scientists who are leaders in their fields. Within each chapter, applications, mathematical analyses, and future possibilities are all well covered by the authors. The first chapter serves as a review of the role of drugs in treating disease and the factors that come into play when developing delivery systems for these drugs. The book continues with chapters on the behavior of drugs within the

body: drug absorption, pharmacokinetics, drug availability, and drug distribution. The focus then shifts to the behavior of the drug itself with the topics of drug stability and preformulation. The next ten chapters deal with various aspects of dosage forms and release systems: topical pharmaceutical systems, disperse systems, tablet dosage forms, specialty tablets, gelatin capsules, parenteral products, ophthalmic products, aerosols, controlled release systems, and site-specific drug delivery. The remaining chapters involve packaging, processing, drug quality, and drug regulations. The final chapter is entitled “A View to the Future” and is written by the editors. It is an insightful chapter which evaluates not only the possibilities in drug design and delivery, but also the trends in the pharmaceutical industry as a whole as well as hospital and community practices which greatly influence the use of drug products. With the exception of three poorly defined figures in the first chapter (reproduced from a 1968 report) this reviewer can find no fault in this book. It is an outstanding text for use in the classroom as well as good reading and a good reference for scientists in pharmaceutics and related fields.

LISA BRANNON-PEPPAS Eli Lilly Research Laboratories Greenfield, IN, U.S.A.