Molecular evolution and the origin of life

Molecular evolution and the origin of life

202 BOOK REVIEWS erties, and generation of this allotrope of oxygen. The remainder of the article considers the determination of ozone in the atmos...

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202

BOOK

REVIEWS

erties, and generation of this allotrope of oxygen. The remainder of the article considers the determination of ozone in the atmosphere and waters. The ozone treatment of water, sewerage, and effluents to reduce bacterial count or biological oxygen demand is receiving increasing attention worldwide. More analysts will, consequently, be called upon to determine residual trace ozone and to assess the efficacy of ozone treatment. This encyclopedia continues to be an important contribution to the literature of practical chemical analysis. Analytical chemists should assure that their corporate or institutional library is indeed subscribing to the work. Four or more volumes and a general index must appear before the work is complete. Yet it is not too early to express the hope that the editorial staff not be disbanded, but rather work be initiated toward a second edition. There may be merit for the Editors to send a questionnaire to current subscribers inviting both criticism of the first edition and recommendations for supplementary volumes and a second edition. A. J. BARNARD, JR., J. T. Baker Chemical Co. Phillipsburg, NW Jersey 08865

Molecular

Evolution

DOSE, W. H. Freeman

and the Origin and Company,

of Life. BY SIDNEY W. Fox AND KLAUS San Francisco, 1972. xi + 359 pp. $16.00.

In a series of carefully documented chapters the history of changing concepts of molecular evolution and the origin of life, the synthesis of micro- and macromolecules and their self-assembly into microsystems and a variety of interpretations of these phenomena in relation to observations on primitive life forms establish bases for a constructionistic approach rather than a reductionistic analysis of the spontaneous generation of pre-Darwinian life. These sections are followed by a discussion of the evolution (in Darwinian terms) of primitive living systems and a critique of some of the initial problems of extraterrestrial observations. An abundance of citations to the basic literature facilitates further study by the serious student. The credentials of the authors as experts in this challenging area of biological science are impeccable and their approach in this volume is scholarly and objective. This reviewer shares Oparin’s conviction, expressed in the foreword that this book “will be welcomed with great satisfaction by all readers interested in the far-reaching concepts of our world and its origins.” ROBERT

A.

American Society of Biological Chemists, 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20014

HARTE,