Multiple Apical Foramina of Tooth Roots

Multiple Apical Foramina of Tooth Roots

MULTIPLE APICAL F O R A M IN A OF T O O T H RO OTS. By Dr. J. R. Callahan, Cincinnati, Ohio. (Special Research Director for the Research Institute of ...

97KB Sizes 2 Downloads 24 Views

MULTIPLE APICAL F O R A M IN A OF T O O T H RO OTS. By Dr. J. R. Callahan, Cincinnati, Ohio. (Special Research Director for the Research Institute of The National Dental Association in the Cincin­ nati General Hospital.)

I

T IS essential to the proper under­ standing and treatment of foci of sys­ temic infection arising from the presFigure 1.

foramina. Later Feiler shows by re­ moving cemental tissue from root ends with sand paper disks that the multiple foramina of Fischers were canals or holes in cemental tissue produced by the action of antiforamen, a powerful sol­ vent of organic substance. The surface of root ends so treated show that these minute canals or holes do not connect with the pulp canal, therefore are not true dental foramina. The accompaning photomicrographs show clearly what I have for three years, Figure 3.

Apical third of an adult Cuspid tooth.

ence of infected pulp tissue confined within the root canals of devitalized teeth, that the anatomy of the root caFigure 2.

Root end of Cuspid tooth—Adolescent.

Apical third of Anterior Root of Inferior Molar.

nals of human teeth be more thoroly understood. Anatomical text books mention and illustrate the foramen, “ which transmits the afferent and efferent blood vessels and terminations of the nervous system of the pulp.” Three or four years ago Fischer dis­ covered what appeared to be multiple

in papers on root canal fillings, referred to as colatteral root canals and multiple foramina. Figures 1 and 2 are ground sections of teeth from which the pulp tissue was re­ moved. The canals were then filled with stained rosin solution. The stained rosin solution enters the tubuli, therefore the dentine as well as the collateral canals show dark. Figure 3 is a ground section from a tooth which pulp tissue was re­ moved. The tooth then placed in Hamatoxylin stain over night. This speciman shows a rather frequent collateral branching of the root canals in cuspid teeth. I am not yet prepared to say in what percent of teeth these lateral canals occur. 85