Myasthenia Gravis: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

Myasthenia Gravis: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

Rev Bras Anestesiol 2011; 61: 6: 748-763 CLINICAL INFORMATION CLINICAL INFORMATION Myasthenia Gravis: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature...

2MB Sizes 4 Downloads 71 Views

Rev Bras Anestesiol 2011; 61: 6: 748-763

CLINICAL INFORMATION

CLINICAL INFORMATION

Myasthenia Gravis: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature Ana Laura Colle Kauling 1, Maria Cristina Simões de Almeida 2, Giovani de Figueiredo Locks, TSA 3, Guilherme Muriano Brunharo 4

Summary: Kauling ALC, Almeida MCS, Locks GF, Brunharo GM – Myasthenia Gravis: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature. Background and objectives: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neurologic disease that affects the postsynaptic portion of the neuromuscular junction. It represents a challenge for anesthesiologists due to the diversity of disease manifestations and possibility of postoperative respiratory complications. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the importance of adequate monitoring of the neuromuscular blockade (NMB) due to the multiple presentations of MG. Contents: In this paper we report two cases of patients with MG. The first patient presented with the classical sensitivity to the neuromuscular blocker (NMB) and the second had a similar response to that of a normal patient. The literature review will be restricted to disease characteristics, while the description of its pathophysiology will focus on its reactions to NMB. Conclusions: We suggest that, due to the multiple presentation and treatment of MG, neuromuscular transmission monitors are fundamental when using NMB. Keywords: Neuromuscular Blocking Agents; Myasthenia gravis; Electromyography; Atracurium; Anesthesia, General; Monitoring, Physiologic. ©2011 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

INTRODUCTION

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neurologic disease that affects the post-synaptic portion of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Over the last years, the understanding of the neuromuscular transmission (NMT) and nature of the disease provided better treatment with low mortality, making the expression MG almost unjustifiable 1-5. The precise origin of the immune response is unknown, but thymic abnormalities almost certainly play a relevant role in the genesis of anti-motor plate nicotinic receptor antibodies. These antibody reactions activate the complement system, resulting in damage to the muscular membrane and sodium channels with significant disruption of NMT 2-8. Despite advanced diagnostic and treatment techniques, MG still represents a challenge to anesthesiologists, justified by the several disease manifestations and the possibility

Received from Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brazil. 1. Resident Physician of the Anesthesiology Sector of the Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (FMUSP) 2. Medical degree from Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Germany; Professor of the Departamento de Cirurgia da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC) 3. Anesthesiologist of Hospital Universitário da UFSC 4. Resident Physician of the Anesthesiology Sector of the Hospital Governador Celso Ramos Submitted on September 29, 2010. Approved on February 21, 2011. Correspondence to: Dra. Ana Laura Colle Kauling Av. Dr. Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar, 155 05403000 – São Paulo, SP, Brazil E-mail: [email protected]

748

of severe postoperative ventilatory complications 9,10. In the present article we report two cases of MG patients who had different reactions to neuromuscular blockers (NMB), and the literature review will focus on aspects of the disease and its pathophysiology related to reactions to NMB.

CASE REPORTS Case 1 11 This is a 55-year old male patient, 82 kg, 167 cm, with history of MG who was admitted to undergo transternal thymectomy. He reported chronic use of prednisone 60 mg.day-1, and pyridostigmine 180 mg.day-1, which improved his symptoms considerably. He had no other comorbidities. Laboratory tests and electrocardiogram were normal. Chest X-ray and tomography showed image compatible with increased thymic size. The patient received no premedication and was referred to the operating room on the morning of the surgery without interrupting his daily medications. In the operating room, he was monitored with ECG on DII and V5, automatic noninvasive measurement of blood pressure, pulse oximetry, capnography, and electromyography of the adductor pollicis muscle. After administration of 100% oxygen by face mask, he received propofol 150 mg, and alfentanil 1,500 μg. After loss of the palpebral reflex, electromyography (Relaxograph®) with stimulating electrodes placed on the wrist, on the trajectory of the ulnar nerve, was performed with supramaximal stimuli every 20 seconds with frequency of 2 Hz and train-of-four stimulus (TOF) (Figure 1). Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, November-December, 2011

3:58

3:45

0:19

0:15

0:10

0:05

120

0:00

MYASTHENIA GRAVIS: TWO CASE REPORTS AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

100

50 0 3 0.4

4

0:15

0:07

2 0.4 0:05

120 100

0:00

1 0.8

50 0 1 0.7

2 0.4

3 0.4

3.0

Figure 1 – Electromyographic Tracing of TOF of Adductor Pollicis Muscle in a Patient with MG who Received Fractionated Doses of Cisatracurium. The lower tracing shows the response of a normal patient to the same fractionated doses of cisatracurium11. With author’s and Brazilian Society of Anesthesiology’s permission.

After a short period of stabilization of the tracing, cisatracurium 0.8 mg was administered with an expressive reduction in muscle contraction. Two additional doses of 0.4 mg were administered before the patient was considered to have a satisfactory degree of muscle relaxation for tracheal intubation. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane, nitrous oxide, and fentanyl. At the end of the procedure, which lasted 3 hours and 45 minutes, the T4/T1 ratio was 0.75. We decide to attempt pharmacologic reversion with neostigmine 0.05 mg.kg-1, which was considered unsatisfactory despite the patient had an excellent respiratory pattern. The patient was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit intubated and on assisted ventilation, where he remained for 2 hours with ventilatory assistance. At the end of this period, with decurarization patterns that were considered satisfactory (T4/T1 > 0.9), the patient was extubated. His evolution was satisfactory and he was discharged on the sixth postoperative day.

Case 2 This is a 55-year old female patient, 64 kg, 165 cm, physical status ASA III who was admitted for a mastectomy for breast 120

00:00

00:05

100

50

0

1

Figure 2 – Electromyographic Tracing of the Adductor Pollicis Muscle in a Patient with MG who Received Initially 3.5 mg and, after 4 Minutes, 31.5 mg of Atracurium. The initial tracing did not show muscle fatigue, and muscle relaxation was observed only with a dose of 0.5 mg.kg-1 of atracurium. Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, November-December, 2011

carcinoma. On preoperative evaluation, she reported history of diabetes mellitus and use of insulin, MG for five years and use of valproic acid, amitriptyline, and prednisone. Her laboratorial tests, electrocardiogram, and Chest X-ray were normal. On the morning of the surgery the patient was transferred from the Intensive Care Unit, arriving at the operating room awake, oriented, dyspneic, with SpO2 89%, ventilating with oxygen by a face mask. Monitoring consisted of ECG on DII and V5, automatic noninvasive measurement of blood pressure, pulse oximetry, capnography, electromyography (Relaxograph®), and accelerometry (TOF Watch®) of adductor pollicis muscles, with one monitor on each arm. After inhalation of 100% oxygen by a face mask for three minutes, fentanyl 200 μg and propofol 200 mg were administered. An initial dose of 3.5 mg of atracurium, complemented to 0.5 mg.kg-1 four minutes after the initial dose, was administered. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, oxygen, and 50% air. After anesthetic induction, muscle contraction was verified by electromyography of the adductor pollicis muscle through stimulator electrodes placed on the wrist, on the trajectory of the ulnar nerve. Evoked contraction was performed with supramaximal stimuli every 20 seconds, frequency of 2 Hz, with TOF stimulus (Figure 2). Simultaneously, indirect muscle strength was recorded with an acceleration transducer placed on the contralateral thumb. Both electromyography and accelerometry, performed before the administration of atracurium showed no muscular fatigue. At the end of the procedure, the patient recovered the muscle strength spontaneously, being extubated with T4/T1 of 0.9. With the patient awake, ventilating with O2 via a face mask, her SpO2 was above 90%.

DISCUSSION Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease that usually manifests in young adults or in the elderly, being charac749

KAULING, ALMEIDA, LOCKS ET AL.

terized by weakness and fatigue of skeletal muscles due to repetitive use 3,4,6,12-14. Myasthenia gravis geoepidemiology shows that it is a rare disorder with similar incidence and prevalence in the world, except for infantile MG, which is more common in Asia 15-17. The incidence has increased in the last decades, going from 2-5/1,000,000 to 9-21/1,000,000, but without proportional increase in mortality. The disease attacks mainly women in the third and fourth decades of life in the proportion of 3:2 15. Environmental and microbial agents have been suggested for its etiology, and the association between the disease and hepatitis C virus have been reported. Cross-reaction between antibodies of MG patients with herpes simplex virus, besides other virus, has been reported 18-22. Genetic predisposition for the disease is equally important 23,24. Whether there are predisposing factors is not established, but in some cases the presence of infection, emotional stress, surgeries, trauma, use of antibiotics, or pregnancy have been related to the onset of disease manifestation 1. Ocular and palpebral muscle involvement is at times the only manifestation of MG with symptoms of diplopia and palpebral ptosis. These muscles have particularities that should be mentioned: they are fatigue resistant, have high blood flow for motor units and high mitochondrial content, therefore, they have high metabolic rate. Motor neurons in this area are anatomically small with high discharge frequencies; some muscles have multiple innervations where the end-plate potential, more than the action potential itself, is directly responsible for muscle activation. This means that any reduction in endplate potential has direct repercussion on muscle contraction. The role of immature or fetal receptors on extraocular muscle compromise in MG is controversial, but a factor that makes them susceptible in this disease is without any doubt the low expression of complement system regulators, making them susceptible to muscle membrane damage by this system, which is activated by the antigen-antibody reaction 25. Besides the compromise of palpebral muscles, the involvement of face and bulbar muscles can be incapacitating and life-threatening 3. Table I shows the percentage of muscular involvement in MG. Although many aspects of MG still have no convincing explanation, there is no doubt about the immunologic character of the disease, proven by the substantial improvement of patients with plasmapheresis 26,27. Antibodies, usually IgG1 and IgG3, are capable of activating the complement system 2. The nature of these immunoglobulins indicates that they are T lymphocyte-dependent and that thymic cells type ED4 help B cells in their production 28,29. Thus, in an expressive percentage of patients, especially young ones, the thymus is abnormal 4. Despite a significant number of patients with thymic involvement, the presence of other sites of formation of these antibodies has been suggested, since patients are clinically improved after thymectomy but not cured 30. The main focus of these antibodies is, without any doubt, the NMJ, site of many drug interactions and intoxications because in this region there is no hematologic barrier 31,32. Thus, similar to MG, other autoimmune diseases that also interfere 750

Table I – Percentage of Muscle Involvement in MG 1,2,15 Muscles

Percentage of involvement

Ocular

17%

Ocular and bulbar

13%

Mild/moderate

2%

Moderate/severe

11%

Ocular and limbs

20%

Generalized

50%

Mild

2%

Moderate

14%

Severe

15%

Requiring ventilatory assistance

11%

Death despite ventilatory assistance 8% MG: Myasthenia Gravis.

with muscle contraction have been identified. Among them we could mention the reaction against calcium channels in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and against potassium channels in congenital neuromyotonia 2. Most patients have anti-muscular nicotinic receptor antibodies, and there are those being considered a special subgroup of MG. In such patients, antibodies against muscle-specific kinase, a molecule in the proximity of the muscular nicotinic receptor that maintains the anatomic integrity of the NMJ, are detected 30. Note that antibodies in MG do not attack subunits α3 or α4β2 of the nicotinic receptors, explaining the absence of autonomic and central nervous system symptoms 33. Finally, in 10% of patients, antibodies are not detected; however, they have satisfactory response to plasmapheresis, and injection of plasma from these patients induces MG in animals, suggesting that, even though antibodies are not detected by traditional methods, there must be an antibody-producing mechanism involved in this type of MG 3,4,13. Clinical evolution, age, involvement of human leukocyte antigen, antibodies against nicotinic, and ryanodine receptors, besides the presence of thymic disease, help classify and predict the evolution of the disease. Myasthenia gravis classification according to clinical and laboratory aspects is presented in Tables II and III, respectively. To understand the pathophysiology of MG and reaction to NMB it is important among other aspects to understand the ways of maintaining the anatomic integrity of NMJ and muscular nicotinic receptor function when occupied by the neurotransmitter. Didactically, two important mechanisms maintain neuromuscular junction trophism. The first is the electrical activity from the motor neuron that affects the entire muscular surface, and the second is the involvement of molecular signals equally from axonal origin 30. The normal electrical activity from the undivided nerve inhibits acetylcholine receptor formation in all muscle nuclei Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, November-December, 2011

MYASTHENIA GRAVIS: TWO CASE REPORTS AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Table II – Classification of MG According to the Ossermann Scale 34 Type I

Ocular myasthenia characterized by ptosis and diplopia

Type IIa

Slow onset, frequently ocular, with gradual evolution to skeletal musculature

Type IIb

Slow onset with dysarthria, dysphagia, and changes in mastication

Type III

Fast onset with severe bulbar and skeletal muscle fatigue with respiratory muscle compromise

Type IV

Severe MG that manifests in two years

MG: Myasthenia Gravis.

Table III – Classification of MG in Subgroups 3,13,15 Subgroups

Age (years)

HLA association

Thymic disease

Antibodies

early manifestation

< 40

DR3B8

Hyperplasia

AchR

late manifestation

> 40

DR2B7 (weak)

Normal for age

AchR, ryanodine and titin receptors*

Thymoma

Variable

Unknown

Tumor

AchR

MG with anti-AchR antibody:

AchR, ryanodine and titin receptors* Antibody with low AchR affinity

Variable

Unknown

Some cases of hyperplasia

Little affinity for AchR

Ocular MG

Variable

Unknown

Unknown

AchR 50%; AchR with low affinity

MuKi-MG

Variable

DR14DQ5

Normal

MuKi

Anti-AchR/MuKi antibody negative

Variable

Unknown

Not clear

Negative

E-LMS

20-60

DR3B8

No reported

VGCa++R

E-LMS scLC

> 40

Unknown

Not reported

VGCa++R

Neuromyotonia

20-60

Unknown

Maybe thymoma

VGK+R in 40%

MG: Myasthenia Gravis. AchR: acetylcholine receptor. HLA: human leukocyte antigen. DR3B8, DR7B7, DR14DQ5: subtypes of human leukocyte antigen. *titin: giant filamentous muscular protein essential for muscular development and structure, and muscular function. MuKi: muscle-specific kinase. Ag: antigen. E-LMS : EatonLambert Myasthenic Syndrome. VGCa++R: voltage-gated calcium receptor. scLC: small-cell lung carcinoma. VGK+R: voltage-gated potassium receptor.

except in subsynaptic nuclei. The direct consequence, when there is normal nerve activity, is the reduction in extrajunctional receptor formation and stimulation of motor plate receptor formation. Two substances (agrin and neuregulin) mediated by muscle-specific kinase are involved in maintaining the trophism of the motor plate. They are nerve-derived and bound to the basement lamina 35-37. Some other forms of agrin, such as in blood vessels, kidneys, and muscles similar to that found in the motor plate do not lead to the formation or aggregation of acetylcholine receptors in the NMJ 30. An experimental study 38 suggests that neuronal agrin regulates both the differentiation of the pre-synaptic region and the muscular subsynaptic region. This molecule works in the muscle subsynaptic nucleus and induces the expression of acetylcholine receptors and their aggregation on the surface of the muscle membrane in the proximity of the axon terminal. Equally important in this mechanism is the presence of rapsin. Muscle-specific kinase Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, November-December, 2011

is also involved on kinase receptors and neuregulin, which also interfere in the formation of acetylcholine receptors and their expression on the muscle membrane and sodium receptors 3,39-44. In MG, the presence of muscle-specific kinase antibodies changes these complex mechanisms that maintain trophism and, as a result, an impoverishment of junctional acetylcholine receptors and an increase in extrajunctional acetylcholine receptors is observed 45, a mechanism similar to that observed in patients whose binomial nerve-muscle is interrupted 30. The neuromuscular junction is a complex synapse that has three distinct components: presynaptic axonal terminal, site of acetylcholine synthesis and storage; synaptic cleft; and postsynaptic membrane, where nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase are located 30. Normal NMT begins when a nerve action potential arrives to the axonal presynaptic terminal, generating a calcium influx that penetrates in the 751

KAULING, ALMEIDA, LOCKS ET AL.

axon through specific type P and Q calcium channels, called voltage-gated. They are opened whenever there is change in membrane voltage 43. Calcium penetrates in the axon and, by acting on calmodulin, it releases acetylcholine vesicles from the cellular cytoskeleton. These free-vesicles move and go to the axonal periphery in the pre-synaptic portion of the motor plate. Through mechanisms involving molecules bound to the axonal membrane the membrane vesicle and the axonal membrane merges leading to acetylcholine exocytosis, all calcium-dependent mechanisms. The basement membrane is also located in the synaptic cleft. Proteins such as collagen, laminin, fibronectin, and perlecan on this structure are important components for efficient NMT. ColQ, a molecule similar to collagen, connected to acetylcholinesterase, is the characteristic example of a basement membrane-bound substance fundamental in the NMT mechanism 46. Once released on the synaptic cleft acetylcholine molecules occupy muscular acetylcholine receptors besides other neuronal receptors, and in special situations the extrajunctional receptors. To increase the contact area the postsynaptic membrane forms invaginations into the interior of the muscular cell, where nicotinic receptors anchor and remain on their crests, while sodium channels are on their deeper portions 43,47.

The key elements of the postsynaptic region are, without any doubt, the muscular acetylcholine receptor and calcium molecules. Once acetylcholine molecules are bound to α1 and ε and α1 and δ subunits on the extracellular portion of the receptor, they cause a physiologic torsion of approximately 10 degrees, especially in α subunits, resulting in anatomical modification of the pore, located in the transmembrane portion. Through the central pore, now with greater diameter, sodium ions enter and initiate an action potential in the postsynaptic region changing membrane polarity also known as “end-plate potential” 36,44,48,49. In normal adults this potential is much higher than necessary to generate an action potential in the muscle cell, and this was called the “NMT safety factor”. The action of acetylcholinesterase nullifies the effects of acetylcholine 3,30,42. Figure 3 shows the physiologic sites that acetylcholine binds to the muscle nicotinic receptor and the movement of the receptor, resulting in the opening of the central pore. Because 17 genes encode muscle cholinergic receptors scientists have great difficulties in determining the mutations of these receptors 46. Thus, some functions are regulated by more than one gene, and different mutations may result in disease with the same phenotype. This is exemplified by at least 56 mutations that cause Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes,

Figure 3 – Nicotinic Receptor: Allosteric Transition Model Known as “Twisted quaternary Model”. In (a): lateral view of the resting and activated receptor model. A schematic representation of the moving quaternary structure is equally demonstrated as cylinder. In (b): transmembrane area of the resting and active models, similar to that demonstrated in (a). Reproduced with permission of Changeux JP 44 and the editor. 752

Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, November-December, 2011

MYASTHENIA GRAVIS: TWO CASE REPORTS AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

a group of diseases causing changes in NMT 46. They were classified into presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic. The first was described in children who had normal motor plate, but reduced size acetylcholine vesicles. This group comprises entities with decreased number of acetylcholine molecules released during exocytosis 46. Synaptic disorders are related to acetylcholinesterase deficiency. This is a genetic defect of ColQ. On chronic deficiency due to genetic mutation of this molecule, more precisely on the 3p24.2 locus, there is a reduction in the bioavailability of acetylcholinesterase on the synaptic cleft, and consequently excess of acetylcholine. This leads to repetitive and persistent muscle stimulation resulting in desensitization of the motor plate nicotinic receptors. This is a rare disease with only 17 cases described in the literature 50. Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes classified as postsynaptic are related to abnormalities in muscular nicotinic receptors46. The main mutations observed are located in α1, β1, and ε subunits 46, so that the abnormal receptor does not respond with physiologic movement when acetylcholine molecules bind to it, and the central pore does not allow sodium molecules to go through 44. Based on the mutations observed in MG, three distinct receptor behaviors have been described. The first, called “function gain” in which mutations results in slow closure of the central pore and greater receptor affinity for acetylcholine. They are also known as “slow channel syndromes” 51. Neurotransmission is compromised by the excessive cation load that leads to the destruction of muscular invaginations of the motor plate, receptor desensitization, and motor blockade due to depolarization 46. It is the most common type of the disease. The second is called “loss of function”. In this situation the inverse mechanism is seen, i.e., the pore clos-

es early. This type of MG is called “fast channel syndrome”. The response to acetylcholine is greatly reduced despite the increased amount of acetylcholine quantum released by the axon. And in the third behavior there are situations in which both changes are present 46. In all three dysfunctions a significant compromise of the NMT is observed 43; there are different approaches and pharmacologic responses to treatment of MG in these three modalities of receptor reaction. Figure 4 shows the graphic representation of subunit α1 mutations in MG. In MG, besides channel dysfunction, the architecture of the muscle membrane is also compromised especially due to the complement system 3,4,52. The immediate consequence is change in the quality and speed of the “end-plate potential” leading to dysfunction of the voltage-gated sodium channel. The final result is the loss of the “NMT safety factor” causing muscle fatigue and weakness 5. A recent study suggested that besides changes in the motor plate there is also more distant compromise, most precisely in the actin-myosin system of muscle excitation/contraction. This is observed particularly in patients with the generalized form of the disease who usually have a thymoma, which may be another contributing factor for disease symptoms 53. Thymectomy is the characteristic situation in which the patients will undergo anesthesia. Care of MG patients is basically focused on the preoperative use of anticholinesterase drugs, reaction to NMB, and possible transoperative drug interactions 54,55. Factors that can lead to the need of postoperative ventilatory assistance are equally important 56,57. Thus it has been suggested that treatment with anticholinesterase drugs should not be interrupted before surgery, and one should prefer regional anesthesia whenever possible 9.

Figure 4 – Distribution of Mutations in MG. In (a) mutations with gain and loss of function are diffusely distributed in the extracellular and transmembrane areas of the receptor. In (b), the representation of these pathologic mutations is, according to the “twisted quaternary model”, located among the subunits and rigid areas of the receptor. Reproduced with permission of Changeux JP 44 and the editor. Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, November-December, 2011

753

KAULING, ALMEIDA, LOCKS ET AL.

When general anesthesia is the choice, additional care should be taken with the injection of NMB. As a rule, the reaction to muscle relaxants is unpredictable in MG patients. Regarding succinylcholine patients are often resistant to this drug requiring larger doses to obtain maximal blockade 58. This can be explained by the reduced number of receptors hindering the drug from effectively depolarizing the motor plate. However, the reaction is not always one of resistance, and patients that use anticholinesterase drugs or those who underwent preoperative plasmapheresis may have a potentiating effect of succinylcholine 9,55,57,50-64. The authors indicate that the effects are inversely proportional to the activity of plasma cholinesterase 64. Most patients seropositive or not for MG have increased sensitivity to non-depolarizing NMB 9,56,60. The pattern of NMT monitoring before the injection of NMB usually is of muscle fatigue, and patients require very low doses to maintain maximum relaxation. This was seen in Case 1 (Figure 1). However, the authors observed that if before the injection of NMB the patient does not show a pattern of fatigue after evoked stimulation, the response to and the doses of NMB will be similar to those used in normal patients 12. This absence of fatigue was recorded by electromyography of the pollicis adductor muscle in Case 2, in which the response to NMB followed the pattern of a normal patient (Figure 2).

754

Therefore, we suggest that due to the variety of response to NMB from extreme sensitivity to conventional response, similar to that observed in patients without MG, the monitoring of NMT in MG mandatory, and it should be initiated before the injection of the NMB. It has been recommended the use of a strong stimulus, such as TOF 12,65. In addition to the information on patient response to NMB, this type of neurostimulation is equally useful in detecting residual blockade at the end of the procedure. Recently, authors have reported successful reversion of rocuronium-induced blockade by sugammadex in patients with MG 66,67. The great advantage of this new antagonist is the constancy of motor blockade reversion in MG patients, as it does not depend of interactions with preoperative anticholinesterase agents 68. To conclude, MG is defined as an autoimmune neurologic disease that affects the postsynaptic portion of the NMJ with involvement, in most cases, of the thymus. Due to the multiple forms of disease presentation, treatment, and evolution, and as a way to predict the response to NMB and its satisfactory reversion, monitoring of the NMT with TOF during anesthesia assessing muscle response before the administration of NMB is recommended.

Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, November-December, 2011

Rev Bras Anestesiol 2011; 61: 6: 748-763

INFORMAÇÕES CLÍNICAS

INFORMAÇÕES CLÍNICAS

Miastenia Gravis: Relato de Dois Casos e Revisão da Literatura Ana Laura Colle Kauling 1, Maria Cristina Simões de Almeida 2, Giovani de Figueiredo Locks, TSA 3, Guilherme Muriano Brunharo 4

Resumo: Kauling ALC, Almeida MCS, Locks GF, Brunharo GM – Miastenia Gravis: Relato de Dois Casos e Revisão da Literatura. Justificativa e objetivos: A Miastenia Gravis (MG) é uma doença neurológica autoimune que afeta a porção pós-sináptica da junção neuromuscular. Trata-se de um desafio ao anestesiologista, pela diversidade das manifestações da doença e pela possibilidade de complicações ventilatórias no pós-operatório. O objetivo deste trabalho é demonstrar a importância da monitoração adequada ao bloqueio neuromuscular (BNM) em virtude das múltiplas formas de apresentação da MG. Conteúdo: Neste artigo serão descritos dois casos de pacientes com MG – um que apresentou a forma clássica de sensibilidade ao bloqueador neuromuscular (BNM) e outro com resposta semelhante à de um paciente normal. A revisão da literatura será restrita às características da doença e a descrição de sua fisiopatologia estará voltada às reações aos BNM. Conclusões: Como conclusão, sugere-se que, em decorrência das múltiplas formas de apresentação e de tratamento da MG, é fundamental o uso de monitores da transmissão neuromuscular quando se usa BNM. Unitermos: ANESTESIA, Geral; BLOQUEADOR MUSCULAR, Atracúrio; DOENÇAS, Muscular, Miastenia Gravis; MONITORAÇÃO; TÉCNICAS DE MEDIÇÃO, Eletromiografia. ©2011 Elsevier Editora Ltda. Todos os direitos reservados.

INTRODUÇÃO A Miastenia gravis (MG) é uma doença neurológica auto-imune que afeta a porção pós-sináptica da junção neuromuscular (JNM). Nos últimos anos, a compreensão da fisiopatologia da transmissão neuromuscular (TNM) e da natureza da doença proporcionou melhor tratamento com baixa mortalidade, tornando o termo MG quase injustificável 1-5. A origem precisa da resposta imune é desconhecida, mas as anormalidades do timo certamente desempenham papel relevante na gênese dos anticorpos contra os receptores nicotínicos da placa motora. Essas reações com anticorpos suscitam ativação do sistema do complemento, que resultam, em última análise, em lesão da membrana muscular e dos canais de sódio, com significativo comprometimento da TNM 2-8.

Recebido da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brasil. 1. Médica residente do Serviço de Anestesiologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (FMUSP) 2. Doutor em Medicina pela Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Alemanha; Professor Adjunto do Departamento de Cirurgia da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC) 3. Médico Anestesiologista do Hospital Universitário da UFSC 4. Médico residente do Serviço de Anestesiologia do Hospital Governador Celso Ramos Submetido em 29 de setembro de 2010. Aprovado para publicação em 21 de fevereiro de 2011. Correspondência para: Dra. Ana Laura Colle Kauling Av. Dr. Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar, 155 05403000 – São Paulo, SP, Brasil E-mail: [email protected]

Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, Novembro-Dezembro, 2011

A despeito das técnicas avançadas de diagnóstico e tratamento, a MG ainda é um desafio ao anestesiologista, justificado pelas diversas formas de manifestação da doença e pela possibilidade de complicações ventilatórias graves no período pós-operatório 9,10. Neste artigo serão descritos dois casos de pacientes com MG que apresentaram reações diferentes aos bloqueadores neuromusculares (BNM); a revisão bibliográfica enfocará aspectos da doença e de sua fisiopatologia relacionados às reações aos BNM.

RELATO DOS CASOS Caso 1 11 Paciente masculino, 55 anos, 82 kg, 167 cm de altura, foi internado com história de MG para ser submetido a uma timectomia por via transesternal. Relatava uso crônico de prednisona 60 mg.dia-1 e de piridostigmina 180 mg.dia-1, que melhoravam sensivelmente seu quadro clínico. Não apresentava outras comorbidades. Exames laboratoriais e eletrocardiograma eram normais. A radiografia e a tomografia de tórax acusaram imagem compatível com aumento do timo. O paciente não recebeu medicação pré-anestésica e foi encaminhado ao centro cirúrgico na manhã da operação, sem interrupção das medicações de uso rotineiro. Na sala de operação, foi monitorado com ECG em DII e V5, pressão arterial não invasiva com aferição automática, oximetria de pulso, capnografia e eletromiografia do músculo adutor do polegar. 755

3:58

3:45

0:19

0:15

0:10

0:05

120

0:00

KAULING, ALMEIDA, LOCKS E COL.

100

50 0 3 0.4

4

0:15

0:07

2 0.4 0:05

120 100

0:00

1 0.8

50 0 1 0.7

2 0.4

3 0.4

3.0

Figura 1 – Traçado eletromiográfico da SQE do músculo adutor do polegar em paciente com MG, que recebeu doses fracionadas de cisatracúrio. O traçado inferior mostra a resposta de um paciente normal às mesmas doses fracionadas de cisatracúrio11. Com permissão do autor e da Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia.

Após a administração de oxigênio a 100% por máscara facial, recebeu propofol 150 mg e alfentanil 1.500 μg. Após a perda do reflexo palpebral, realizou-se eletromiografia (Relaxograph®) com os eletrodos estim++uladores colocados no trajeto do nervo ulnar no punho e com impulsos supramáximos a cada 20 segundos, com frequência de 2 Hz e sequência de quatro estímulos (SQE) (Figura 1). Após curto período de estabilização do traçado foi injetado cisatracúrio na dose de 0,8 mg, havendo diminuição expressiva da contração muscular. Duas doses adicionais de 0,4 mg foram administradas quando se considerou, então, o paciente em grau satisfatório de relaxamento para intubação traqueal. A anestesia foi mantida com isoflurano, óxido nitroso e fentanil. Ao fim do procedimento de 3 horas e 45 minutos, a relação T4/T1 era de 0,75. Optou-se por tentar a reversão farmacológica com neostigmina 0,05 mg.kg-1, que foi considerada insatisfatória apesar de haver excelente padrão de ventilação. O paciente foi encaminhado à Unidade de Tratamento Intensivo em intubação traqueal e ventilação assistida, onde permaneceu por duas horas em assistência ventilatória. Ao final desse tempo, e com padrões considerados satisfatórios de descurarização (T4/T1 > 0,9), o paciente foi extubado. Evoluiu satisfatoriamente e teve alta no sexto dia de pós- operatório.

não invasiva aferida automaticamente, oximetria de pulso, capnografia, eletromiografia (Relaxograph®) e acelerometria (TOF Watch®) dos músculos adutores do polegar, sendo instalado um monitor em cada braço. Após a inalação de oxigênio a 100% por máscara facial por três minutos, a paciente recebeu fentanil 200 μg e propofol 200 mg. A dose inicial de atracúrio foi de 3,5 mg, posteriormente complementada para 0,5 mg.kg-1 após quatro minutos da dose inicial. A anestesia foi mantida com sevofurano, oxigênio e ar em 50%. Após a indução, a contração muscular foi aferida por eletromiografia do músculo adutor do polegar, através de eletrodos estimuladores instalados no trajeto do nervo ulnar no punho. A contração evocada foi realizada com impulsos supramáximos a cada 20 segundos, à frequência de 2 Hz, com SQE (Figura 2). Simultaneamente, foi registrada a força muscular de forma indireta, com transdutor de aceleração instalado no polegar contralateral ao que estava sendo registrado com EMG. Tanto a eletromiografia quanto a acelerometria, realizadas antes da administração do atracúrio, não demonstraram fadiga muscular.

Caso 2 120

Paciente do sexo feminino, 55 anos, 64 kg e 165 cm, estado físico ASA III, internou-se para ser submetida à mastectomia por carcinoma de mama. Na avaliação pré- operatória, relatou história de diabetes mellitus em uso de insulina e MG conhecida há cinco anos, em uso de ácido valproico, amitriptilina e prednisona. Seus exames laboratoriais, o eletrocardiograma e a radiografia de tórax eram normais. Na manhã da cirurgia, a paciente veio encaminhada da Unidade de Terapia Intensiva e chegou à sala operatória lúcida, dispneica, com valor de oximetria (SpO2) em 89%, ventilando com o auxílio de máscara facial com oxigênio. A monitoração foi realizada com ECG em DII e V5, pressão arterial 756

00:00

00:05

100

50

0 1

Figura 2 – Traçado eletromiográfico do músculo adutor do polegar em paciente com MG que recebeu inicialmente 3,5 mg e, após quatro minutos, 31,5 mg de atracúrio. O traçado inicial não evidencia fadiga muscular, e o relaxamento muscular só se deu com dose de 0,5 mg.kg-1 de atracúrio. Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, Novembro-Dezembro, 2011

MIASTENIA GRAVIS: RELATO DE DOIS CASOS E REVISÃO DA LITERATURA

Ao final do procedimento, a paciente recuperou a função muscular espontaneamente e foi extubada com T4/T1 em 0,9. A SpO2, com a paciente lúcida ventilando com máscara facial com 5 L de O2, mostrava valores superiores a 90%.

DISCUSSÃO A MG é uma doença auto-imune crônica que se manifesta usualmente em adultos jovens ou em idosos e é caracterizada por fraqueza e fadiga dos músculos esqueléticos de uso repetitivo 3,4,6,12-14. A geo-epidemiologia da MG mostra que se trata de uma doença rara, de incidência e prevalência similares no mundo, exceto para MG infantil, que é mais comum na Ásia 15-17. A incidência aumentou nas últimas décadas e passou de 2-5/1.000.000 para 9-21/1.000.000, porém sem haver aumento proporcional na mortalidade. A doença acomete, predominantemente, mulheres nas terceira e quarta décadas na proporção de 3:2 15. Como etiologia, tem-se sugerido influência ambiental e de agentes microbianos, e há relatos de casos da associação da doença com o vírus da hepatite C. Ainda é possível registrar reações cruzadas entre os anticorpos de pacientes com MG com o vírus do herpes simplex, além de outras doenças virais 18-22. Igualmente importante é a predisposição genética para a doença 23,24. Não está claramente estabelecido se há fatores precipitantes da MG, mas em alguns casos, presença de infecção, estresse emocional, cirurgias, traumas, uso de antibióticos ou gestação têm sido relacionados ao início das manifestações dessa doença 1. O envolvimento dos músculos extra-oculares e das pálpebras é, por vezes, a única manifestação da MG, com sintomas de diplopia e ptose palpebral. Esses músculos apresentam particularidades que podem ser citadas: são resistentes à fadiga, têm alto fluxo sanguíneo para as unidades motoras e possuem conteúdo mitocondrial farto, portanto apresentam alto índice metabólico. Os neurônios motores dessa região são anatomicamente pequenos e as frequências de disparo são altas; alguns músculos possuem inervação múltipla, onde o potencial final de placa, mais do que o potencial de ação em si, é responsável direto pela ativação muscular. Isso significa que qualquer redução do potencial final de placa repercute diretamente na contração muscular. O papel dos receptores imaturos ou fetais no comprometimento dos músculos extraoculares na MG é ainda motivo de controvérsia, mas um fator que os torna suscetíveis nessa doença é, sem dúvida, a baixa expressão dos reguladores do sistema do complemento, o que os torna vulneráveis à lesão da membrana muscular por esse sistema, ativada pela reação antígeno-anticorpo 25. Além do comprometimento dos músculos palpebrais, o envolvimento de músculos da face e bulbares pode ser incapacitante, impondo risco à vida do paciente 3. O percentual de acometimento muscular na MG está apontado na Tabela I. Embora muitos aspectos da MG ainda permaneçam sem explicação convincente, não há dúvida acerca do caráter imuRevista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, Novembro-Dezembro, 2011

Tabela I – Percentual de Acometimento Muscular na MG Músculos

1,2,15

Percentual de acometimento

Ocular

17%

Ocular e bulbar

13%

Leve/moderado

2%

Moderado/intenso

11%

Ocular e de membros

20%

Generalizada

50%

Leve

2%

Moderado

14%

Intenso

15%

Com necessidade da AV.

11%

Morte apesar da AV.

8%

MG: Miastenia Gravis; AV: Assistência Ventilatória.

nológico da doença, comprovado pela melhora substancial dos pacientes com a plasmaferese 26,27. Os anticorpos são usualmente do tipo IgG1 e IgG3, capazes de ativar o sistema do complemento 2. A natureza dessas imunoglobulinas indica que são dependentes de linfócitos T, e que células do timo do tipo ED4 auxiliam células B em sua produção 28,29. Assim, em um percentual expressivo de pacientes, principalmente os jovens, o timo está anormal 4. A despeito de haver um número significativo de pacientes com envolvimento do timo, sugere-se a existência de outros sítios de formação desses anticorpos, porque a timectomia melhora clinicamente os pacientes, mas não os cura da doença 30. O foco principal desses anticorpos é sem dúvida a JNM, local de muitas interações medicamentosas e intoxicações, pois nessa região não há barreira hematológica 31,32. Assim, a exemplo da MG, também tem sido identificada uma série de outras doenças auto-imunes que igualmente interferem na contração muscular. Dentre elas, pode-se citar a reação contra os canais de cálcio na síndrome miastênica de Lambert-Eaton e contra os canais de potássio na neuromiotonia congênita 2. A maioria dos pacientes apresenta anticorpos contra os receptores nicotínicos musculares e há ainda aqueles que estão sendo considerados como um subgrupo especial de MG. Nesses, são detectados anticorpos contra a cinase específica para os músculos, uma molécula localizada nas proximidades do receptor nicotínico muscular e que atua na manutenção da integridade anatômica da JNM 30. Interessante observar que os anticorpos na MG não agridem, nos receptores nicotínicos, as subunidades α3, nem as α4β2, o que explica a ausência de sintomas autonômicos e sobre o sistema nervoso central 33. Por último, em 10% dos pacientes não se detectam anticorpos, porém esses respondem satisfatoriamente à plasmaferese e a injeção de plasma desses pacientes em animais de experimentação induz neles o aparecimento de MG, sugerindo que, mesmo sem a detecção de anticorpos por métodos tradicionais, deve igualmente haver 757

KAULING, ALMEIDA, LOCKS E COL.

um mecanismo de anticorpogênese envolvido nessa forma de MG 3,4,13. Evolução clínica da doença, idade, envolvimento do antígeno leucocitário humano, positividade para anticorpos contra os receptores nicotínicos da placa motora e de rianodina, além da presença de doença do timo, auxiliam na classificação e na previsão da evolução da doença. A classificação da MG conforme aspectos clínicos e laboratoriais figuram nas Tabelas II e III, respectivamente. Para a compreensão da fisiopatologia da MG e das reações aos BNM é importante, entre outros aspectos, o entendimento das formas de manutenção da integridade anatômica da JNM e do funcionamento do receptor nicotínico muscular, quando da ocupação do neurotransmissor. Didaticamente, pode-se expor que, basicamente, são dois os mecanismos mais importantes que mantêm o trofismo da junção nervo e músculo. O primeiro é a própria atividade elétrica provinda do neurônio motor, que atua em toda a superfície do músculo; o segundo diz respeito ao envolvimento de sinais moleculares igualmente de origem axonal 30. A atividade elétrica normal provinda do nervo íntegro inibe a formação de receptores de acetilcolina em todos os núcleos

musculares, exceto nos subsinápticos. A consequência direta, quando há uma atividade normal do nervo, é a diminuição da formação de receptores extrajuncionais e o estímulo à formação de receptores da placa motora. No que tange ao envolvimento de moléculas na manutenção do trofismo da placa motora, podem-se citar, em importância, as ações de duas substâncias – agrina e neuregulina, mediadas pela cinase específica para os músculos, anatomicamente localizada nas proximidades dos receptores nicotínicos musculares. As duas primeiras moléculas provêm do nervo e ligam-se à lâmina basal 35-37. Algumas outras formas de agrina semelhantes à encontrada na placa motora, como as dos vasos sanguíneos, rins e músculos, não levam à formação nem ao agrupamento de receptores de acetilcolina na JNM 30. Estudo em laboratório 38 sugere que a agrina neuronal regula tanto a diferenciação da região pré-sináptica quanto da região subsináptica muscular. Essa molécula atua no núcleo subsináptico do músculo e induz tanto a expressão de receptores de acetilcolina quanto o respectivo agrupamento desses receptores na superfície da membrana muscular nas proximidades do terminal axônico. Igualmente importante nesse mecanismo

Tabela II – Classificação da MG segundo a Escala de Ossermann 34 Tipo I

Miastenia ocular caracterizada com ptose e diplopia

Tipo IIa

Início lento, frequentemente ocular, com evolução gradativa para musculatura esquelética

Tipo IIb

Início lento, com disartria, disfagia e alterações da mastigação

Tipo III

Início rápido, com fadiga grave de músculos bulbares e esqueléticos, com comprometimento dos músculos da respiração

Tipo IV

MG grave que se manifesta em dois anos

MG: Miastenia Gravis.

Tabela III – Classificação da MG segundo Subgrupos 3,13,15 Subgrupos

Idade (anos)

Associação com ALH

Doença do Timo

Anticorpos

manifestação precoce

< 40

DR3B8

Hiperplasia

RAcol

manifestação tardia

> 40

DR2B7(fraco)

Normal para idade

RAcol, Receptor de rianodina e de titina*

Timoma

Variável

Desconhecido

Tumor

-RAcol

MG com Ac RAcol:

RAcol, Receptor de rianodina e de titina* Ac com baixa afinidade RAcol

Variável

Desconhecido

Alguns casos de hiperplasia

Pouca afinidade contra RAcol

MG ocular

Variável

Desconhecido

Desconhecido

RAcol 50% ; RAcol com baixa afinidade

CeMu-MG

Variável

DR14DQ5

Normal

CeMu

Ac negativo RAcol/CeMu

Variável

Desconhecido

Não esclarecido

Negativo

SME-L

20-60

DR3B8

Não relatado

RCa++VD

SME-L com CPcp

> 40

Desconhecido

Não relatado

RCa++VD

Neuromiotonia

20-60

Desconhecido

Talvez timoma

RK+VD em 40%

MG: Miastenia Gravis. Ac: anticorpos. RAcol: receptor de acetilcolina. ALH: antígeno leucocitário humano. DR3B8, DR7B7, DR14DQ5: subtipos de antígeno leucocitário humano. *titina: proteína muscular filamentosa gigante, essencial para desenvolvimento, estrutura e função muscular. CeMu: cinase específica do músculo. Ag: antígeno. SME-L: Síndrome miastênica de Eaton-Lambert. RCa++VD: receptor de cálcio voltagem-dependente. CPcp: carcinoma pulmonar de células pequenas. RK+VD: receptor de potássio voltagem-dependente.

758

Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, Novembro-Dezembro, 2011

MIASTENIA GRAVIS: RELATO DE DOIS CASOS E REVISÃO DA LITERATURA

é a presença de rapsina. O segundo mecanismo de envolvimento da cinase específica para os músculos é sobre os receptores de cinases e neuregulina, que também interferem tanto na formação de receptores de acetilcolina e de sua expressão na membrana muscular como nos receptores de sódio 3,39-44. Na MG, a presença de anticorpos contra a cinase específica para os músculos altera todos esses mecanismos complexos de manutenção do trofismo e, como resultado, evidenciam-se um empobrecimento de receptores de acetilcolina juncionais e um aumento de receptores de acetilcolina extrajuncionais 45, mecanismo semelhante ao que ocorre em pacientes cuja atividade elétrica do binômio nervo-músculo está interrompida 30. A JNM é uma sinapse complexa, que apresenta três componentes distintos: o terminal axônico pré-sináptico – local de síntese e armazenamento da acetilcolina, a fenda sináptica e a membrana pós-sináptica, onde se localizam os receptores nicotínicos e a acetilcolinesterase 30. A TNM normal tem início quando um potencial de ação nervoso chega ao terminal axônico pré-sináptico, gerando um influxo de cálcio que penetra no axônio através de canais de cálcio específicos do tipo P e Q, ditos voltagem-dependentes. Assim, eles são abertos quando há alterações da voltagem da membrana 43. O cálcio penetra no axônio e, ao atuar sobre a calmodulina, libera as vesículas de acetilcolina do citoesqueleto celular. As vesículas livres movimentam-se e dirigem-se à periferia do axônio, na porção pré-sináptica da placa motora. Através de mecanismos que envolvem as moléculas ligadas à membrana do axônio, ocorre a fusão da membrana da vesícula com a membrana axonal e exocitose de acetilcolina, todos mecanismos cálcio-dependentes. Na fenda sináptica localiza-se também a membrana basal. Nessa estrutura, existem proteínas como: colágeno, laminina, fibronectina e perlecam, importantes componentes para uma eficiente TNM. O exemplo característico de substância ligada à membrana basal e fundamental no mecanismo da TNM é a ColQ, uma molécula similar ao colágeno, que se mantém ligada à acetilcolinesterase 46. Uma vez liberadas na fenda sináptica, moléculas de acetilcolina ocupam receptores de acetilcolina musculares, além de outros neuronais e, em situações especiais, os extrajuncionais. Com o objetivo de aumentar a área de contato, a membrana pós-sináptica forma uma série de invaginações para o interior da célula muscular, onde os receptores nicotínicos ancoram-se e permanecem em suas cristas, enquanto os canais de sódio assumem as porções mais profundas delas 43,47. Os elementos-chave da região pós-sináptica são, sem dúvida, o receptor muscular de acetilcolina e as moléculas de cálcio. Uma vez que as moléculas de acetilcolina ligam-se entre as subunidades α1 e ε e α1 e δ na porção extracelular do receptor, provocam fisiologicamente um movimento de torção de aproximadamente 10 graus, principalmente das subunidades α, o que resulta em modificação anatômica do poro localizado na porção transmembrânica. Através do poro central, agora então com diâmetro maior, há entrada de íons sódio que, alterando a polaridade da membrana, dão início a um potencial de ação na região pós-sináptica, também Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, Novembro-Dezembro, 2011

conhecido como “potencial de placa” 36,44,48,49. Esse potencial, em adultos normais, é muito maior do que o necessário para a geração de potencial de ação na célula muscular, e isso foi conceituado como “fator de segurança da TNM”. O término do efeito da acetilcolina é dado pela ação da acetilcolinesterase 3,30,42. Os sítios fisiológicos de ligação da acetilcolina no receptor nicotínico muscular e a movimentação deste, resultando na abertura do poro central, estão representados na Figura 3. A grande dificuldade dos cientistas em determinar as mutações dos receptores colinérgicos musculares é que 17 genes codificam esses receptores 46. Assim, algumas funções são reguladas por mais de um gene e diferentes mutações podem resultar em doenças com o mesmo fenótipo. Isso é exemplificado por, no mínimo, 56 mutações que causam as denominadas Síndromes Miastênicas Congênitas, como são agrupadas essas doenças que cursam com alterações da TNM 46. Elas foram classificadas em pré-sinápticas, sinápticas e pós-sinápticas. As primeiras foram descritas em crianças, que mostraram placa motora normal, mas vesículas de acetilcolina de tamanho reduzido. Ainda nesse grupo, estão as entidades que cursam com a diminuição do número de moléculas de acetilcolina liberadas quando da exocitose 46. As denominadas sinápticas estão relacionadas à deficiência de acetilcolinesterase. Esse é um defeito genético da ColQ, já anteriormente citada. Na deficiência crônica por mutação genética dessa molécula, mais precisamente no locus 3p24.2, há diminuição da biodisponibilidade da acetilcolinesterase na fenda e, como consequência, excesso de acetilcolina. Ocorre, então, uma estimulação repetitiva e persistente do músculo, que resulta, por fim, na dessensibilização dos receptores nicotínicos da placa motora. Trata-se de uma doença muito rara, com apenas 17 casos descritos na literatura 50. As Síndromes Miastênicas Congênitas classificadas como póssinápticas estão relacionadas a anormalidades do receptor nicotínico muscular 46. As principais mutações registradas estão localizadas nas subunidades α1, β1 e ε 46, de forma que o receptor anormal não responde com movimentação fisiológica quando há ligação das moléculas de acetilcolina, e o poro central não permite a passagem adequada de moléculas de sódio 44. Na dependência das mutações observadas na MG, são descritos três comportamentos distintos do receptor nicotínico muscular. O primeiro foi denominado de “ganho de função”, onde as mutações resultam em fechamento lento do poro central e maior afinidade do receptor pela acetilcolina. São também conhecidas como “síndromes do canal lento” 51. A neurotransmissão está comprometida pela carga excessiva de cátions, que leva à destruição das invaginações musculares da placa motora, à dessensibilização do receptor e ao bloqueio motor por despolarização 46. É a forma mais comum da doença. A segunda disfunção é denominada “perda de função”. Nessa situação, ocorre o mecanismo inverso, ou seja, o poro se fecha precocemente. Essa forma de MG recebeu a denominação de “síndrome do canal rápido”. A resposta à acetilcolina está muito reduzida, a despeito do aumento do quantum de acetilcolina liberado pelo axônio. 759

KAULING, ALMEIDA, LOCKS E COL.

Canal de íon fechado

Canal de íon aberto

Figura 3 – O receptor nicotínico: modelo de transição alostérica, denominado “Modelo quaternário torcido”. Em (a): o modelo do receptor em estado de repouso e em estado ativo em visão lateral. Uma representação esquemática da estrutura quaternária em movimento está igualmente demonstrada em forma de cilindros. Em (b): a área transmembrânica dos modelos em repouso e no estado ativo, a exemplo do demonstrado em (a). Reproduzido de Changeux JP 44 com permissão do autor e da editora.

E, por último, há situações em que ambas as alterações estão presentes 46. Em todas as três disfunções, observa-se comprometimento significativo da TNM 43; para essas três modalidades de reação do receptor há diferentes abordagens e respostas farmacológicas no tratamento da MG 44. Na Figura 4, estão representadas graficamente as mutações na MG na subunidade α1. Na MG, além da disfunção de canal, também está comprometida a arquitetura da membrana do músculo, principalmente por ação do sistema do complemento 3,4,52. A consequência imediata é a alteração da qualidade e da velocidade do “potencial de placa”, levando à disfunção dos canais de sódio voltagem dependente. O resultado final é a perda do “Fator de segurança da TNM”, provocando fadiga e fraqueza musculares 5. Estudo recente sugere que, além das alterações na placa motora, há também comprometimento mais a distância, precisamente no sistema actina-miosina de excitação/contração muscular. Isso é observado, particularmente, nos pacientes com a forma generalizada da doença, que costumam apresentar-se com timoma, o que pode ser mais um dos fatores que contribuem para a sintomatologia da doença 53. A timectomia é a situação característica em que o paciente será submetido a uma anestesia. Os cuidados com o 760

paciente portador de MG estão basicamente focados no uso de medicações anticolinesterásicas no pré-operatório, na reação aos BNM e em possíveis interações medicamentosas no período transoperatório 54,55. Igualmente importantes são os fatores que podem levar à necessidade de assistência ventilatória no pós-operatório 56,57. Assim, sugere-se que a terapia com anticolinesterásicos não deve ser interrompida antes da operação e a anestesia regional deve ser preferida sempre que possível 9. Quando a anestesia geral for a escolha, cuidados adicionais devem ser tomados com a injeção de BNM. De forma geral, pode-se dizer que a reação aos relaxantes musculares no paciente com MG é imprevisível. No que tange à succinilcolina, na maioria das vezes, os pacientes mostram-se resistentes, exigindo doses maiores para se obter um bloqueio máximo 58. A explicação está embasada no número reduzido de receptores, o que resulta na dificuldade de a droga efetivamente despolarizar a placa motora. No entanto, nem sempre a reação é de resistência, e pacientes que utilizam anticolinesterásicos ou que fizeram plasmaferese no préoperatório podem apresentar um efeito de potencialização da succinilcolina 9,55,57,59-64. Os autores apontam que os efeitos são inversamente proporcionais à atividade da colinesterase plasmática 64. Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, Novembro-Dezembro, 2011

MIASTENIA GRAVIS: RELATO DE DOIS CASOS E REVISÃO DA LITERATURA

Ganho de função Ganho ou perda de função Perda de função

Figura 4 – Distribuição das mutações na MG. Em (a) as mutações com ganho e perda de função estão distribuídas difusamente, na área extracelular e transmembrânica do receptor. Em (b), a representação dessas mutações patológicas estão, de acordo com o “Modelo quaternário torcido”, situadas entre as subunidades e áreas rígidas do receptor. Reproduzido de Changeux JP 44 com a permissão do autor e da editora.

A maioria dos pacientes soropositivos ou não para MG mostra-se com sensibilidade aumentada aos BNM adespolarizantes 9,56,60. Assim, o padrão de monitoração da TNM antes da injeção do BNM é geralmente de fadiga muscular e os pacientes necessitam de doses muito pequenas para manter um relaxamento máximo. Este foi o exemplo do Caso no 1 (Figura 1). No entanto, autores observaram que, se antes da injeção de BNM o paciente não apresenta o padrão de fadiga à estimulação evocada, a resposta e as doses de BNM serão iguais às de um paciente normal 12. Essa ausência de fadiga foi registrada por eletromiografia do músculo adutor do polegar no Caso no 2, em que a resposta ao BNM seguiu o padrão de um paciente normal (Figura 2). Assim, sugere-se que, pela variedade de respostas aos BNM, desde extrema sensibilidade até uma resposta convencional, semelhante à observada em pacientes sem MG, torna-se mandatória a monitoração da TNM na MG, que deve ser sempre iniciada antes da injeção do relaxante. Recomenda-se, para tanto, o uso de estímulo de forte intensidade, como SQE (TOF: train-of-four) 12,65. Além da informação do comportamento do paciente ao BNM escolhido pelo anestesiologista, essa forma de neuroestimulação é igualmente útil na detecção do bloqueio residual no final do procedimento. Recentemente, autores registram em pacientes com MG sucesso na reversão do bloqueio induzido por rocurônio com o sugammadex 66,67. A grande vantagem no uso desse novo antagonista é a constância na reversão do bloqueio motor nos pacientes com MG, pois não depende de interações com anticolinesterásicos usados no tratamento pré-operatório 68. Como conclusão, a MG é definida como uma doença neurológica auto-imune que afeta a porção pós-sináptica da Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, Novembro-Dezembro, 2011

JNM, cursando, na maioria dos casos, com envolvimento do timo. Em decorrência das múltiplas formas de apresentação, de tratamento e de evolução da doença, e como forma de prever a reação ao BNM e sua satisfatória reversão, sugerese, na anestesia, a monitoração da TNM com a SQE, com a aferição da resposta muscular antes da injeção do BNM.

REFERÊNCIAS / REFERENCES 1.

Grob D, Brunner N, Namba T et al. – Lifetime course of myasthenia gravis. Muscle Nerve, 2008;37:141-149. 2. Meriggioli MN, Sanders DB – Autoimmune myasthenia gravis: emerging clinical and biological heterogeneity. Lancet Neurol, 2009;8:475490. 3. Vincent A – Autoimmune disorders of the neuromuscular junction. Neurol India, 2008;56:305-313. 4. Lang B, Vincent A – Autoimmune disorders of the neuromuscular junction. Curr Opin Pharmacol, 2009;9:336-340. 5. Ruff RL, Lennon VA – How myasthenia gravis alters the safety factor for neuromuscular transmission. J Neuroimmunol, 2008;201-202:1320. 6. Lang B, Vincent A – Autoantibodies to ion channels at the neuromuscular junction. Autoimmun Rev, 2003;2:94-100. 7. Pasnoor M, Wolfe GI, Nations S et al. – Clinical findings in MuSK-antibody positive myasthenia gravis: a U.S. experience. Muscle Nerve, 2009;41:370-374. 8. Provenzano C, Marino M, Scuderi F et al. – Anti-acetylcholinesterase antibodies associate with ocular myasthenia gravis. J Neuroimmunol, 2009;218:102-106. 9. Blobner M, Mann R – Anesthesia in patients with myasthenia gravis. Anaesthesist, 2001;50:484-493. 10. Souza Neto D, Módolo N – Miastenia Gravis: implicações anestésicas. Rev Bras Anestesiol, 1993;43:373-382. 11. Almeida MCS – Uso de Bloqueadores Neuromusculares em Pacientes com Miastenia Gravis. Relato de dois casos. Rev Bras Anestesiol, 2001;51:133-140. 761

KAULING, ALMEIDA, LOCKS E COL.

12. Mann R, Blobner M, Jelen-Esselborn S et al. – Preanesthetic trainof-four fade predicts the atracurium requirement of myasthenia gravis patients. Anesthesiology, 2000;93:346-350. 13. Romi F, Gilhus NE, Aarli JA – Myasthenia gravis: clinical, immunological, and therapeutic advances. Acta Neurol Scand, 2005;111:134141. 14. Meriggioli MN –Myasthenia gravis with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies. Front Neurol Neurosci, 2009;26:94-108. 15. Meyer A, Levy Y – Geoepidemiology of myasthenia gravis. Autoimmun Rev, 2009;9:A383-386. 16. Chiu HC, Vincent A, Newsom-Davis J et al. – Myasthenia gravis: population differences in disease expression and acetylcholine receptor antibody titers between Chinese and Caucasians. Neurology, 1987;37:1854-1857. 17. Phillips LH – The epidemiology of myasthenia gravis. Semin Neurol, 2004;24:17-20. 18. Ercolini AM, Miller SD – Role of immunologic cross-reactivity in neurological diseases. Neurol Res, 2005;27:726-733. 19. McGuire LJ, Huang DP, Teoh R et al. – Epstein-Barr virus genome in thymoma and thymic lymphoid hyperplasia. Am J Pathol, 1988;131:385-390. 20. Mori M, Kuwabara S, Nemoto Y et al. – Concomitant chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and myasthenia gravis following cytomegalovirus infection. J Neurol Sci, 2006;240:103-106. 21. Lalive PH, Allali G, Truffert A – Myasthenia gravis associated with HTLV-I infection and atypical brain lesions. Muscle Nerve, 2007;35:525-528. 22. von Herrath MG, Fujinami RS, Whitton JL – Microorganisms and autoimmunity: making the barren field fertile? Nat Rev Microbiol, 2003;1:151-157. 23. Roxanis I, Micklem K, Willcox N – True epithelial hyperplasia in the thymus of early-onset myasthenia gravis patients: implications for immunopathogenesis. J Neuroimmunol, 2001;112:163-173. 24. Giraud M, Beaurain G, Yamamoto AM et al. – Linkage of HLA to myasthenia gravis and genetic heterogeneity depending on anti-titin antibodies. Neurology, 2001;57:1555-1560. 25. Kaminski HJ, Li Z, Richmonds C et al. – Complement regulators in extraocular muscle and experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. Exp Neurol, 2004;189:333-342. 26. Lennon VA, Lambert EH – Myasthenia gravis induced by monoclonal antibodies to acetylcholine receptors. Nature, 1980;285:238-240. 27. Newsom-Davis J, Pinching AJ, Vincent A et al. – Function of circulating antibody to acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis: investigation by plasma exchange. Neurology, 1978;28:266-272. 28. Protti MP, Manfredi AA, Straub C et al. – Immunodominant regions for T helper-cell sensitization on the human nicotinic receptor alpha subunit in myasthenia gravis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 1990;87:77927796. 29. Wang ZY, Okita DK, Howard Jr. J, et al. – T-cell recognition of muscle acetylcholine receptor subunits in generalized and ocular myasthenia gravis. Neurology, 1998;50:1045-1054. 30. Naguib M, Brull SJ – Update on neuromuscular pharmacology. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol, 2009;22:483-490. 31. Ellison M, Feng ZP, Park AJ et al. – Alpha-RgIA, a novel conotoxin that blocks the alpha9alpha10 nAChR: structure and identification of key receptor-binding residues. J Mol Biol, 2008;377:1216-1227. 32. Saez-Briones P, Krauss M, Dreger M et al. – How do acetylcholine receptor ligands reach their binding sites? Eur J Biochem, 1999;265:902910. 33. Vernino S, Adamski J, Kryzer TJ et al. – Neuronal nicotinic ACh receptor antibody in subacute autonomic neuropathy and cancer-related syndromes. Neurology, 1998;50:1806-1813. 34. Osserman KE, Genkins G – Studies in myasthenia gravis: review of a twenty-year experience in over 1200 patients. Mt Sinai J Med, 1971;38:497-537. 35. Ngo ST, Noakes PG, Phillips WD – Neural agrin: a synaptic stabiliser. Int J Biochem Cell Biol, 2007;39:863-867. 36. Brejc K, van Dijk WJ, Klaassen RV et al. – Crystal structure of an ACh-binding protein reveals the ligand-binding domain of nicotinic receptors. Nature, 2001;411:269-276. 762

37. Poo MM – Neurotrophins as synaptic modulators. Nat Rev Neurosci, 2001;2:24-32. 38. Nitkin RM, Smith MA, Magill C et al. – Identification of agrin, a synaptic organizing protein from Torpedo electric organ. J Cell Biol, 1987;105:2471-2478. 39. Mossman S, Vincent A, Newsom-Davis J – Myasthenia gravis without acetylcholine-receptor antibody: a distinct disease entity. Lancet, 1986;1:116-119. 40. Fuhrer C, Sugiyama JE, Taylor RG et al. – Association of musclespecific kinase MuSK with the acetylcholine receptor in mammalian muscle. EMBO J, 1997;16:4951-4960. 41. Wallace B – scFvs get down to basics: how MuSK makes synapses. Nat Biotechnol, 1997;15:721-722. 42. Naguib M, Flood P, McArdle JJ et al. – Advances in neurobiology of the neuromuscular junction: implications for the anesthesiologist. Anesthesiology, 2002;96:202-231. 43. Hughes BW, Kusner LL, Kaminski HJ – Molecular architecture of the neuromuscular junction. Muscle Nerve, 2006;33:445-461. 44. Changeux JP, Taly A – Nicotinic receptors, allosteric proteins and medicine. Trends Mol Med, 2008;14:93-102. 45. Lindstrom JM – Acetylcholine receptors and myasthenia. Muscle Nerve, 2000;23:453-477. 46. Celesia GG – Disorders of membrane channels or channelopathies. Clin Neurophysiol, 2001;112:2-18. 47. Catterall WA – From ionic currents to molecular mechanisms: the structure and function of voltage-gated sodium channels. Neuron, 2000;26:13-25. 48. Sine SM, Engel AG – Recent advances in Cys-loop receptor structure and function. Nature, 2006;440:448-455. 49. Unwin N – Refined structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at 4A resolution. J Mol Biol, 2005;346:967-989. 50. Ohno K, Brengman J, Tsujino A et al. – Human endplate acetylcholinesterase deficiency caused by mutations in the collagen-like tail subunit (ColQ) of the asymmetric enzyme. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 1998;95:9654-9659. 51. Croxen R, Newland C, Beeson D et al. – Mutations in different functional domains of the human muscle acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit in patients with the slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome. Hum Mol Genet, 1997;6:767-774. 52. Vincent A, Beeson D, Lang B – Molecular targets for autoimmune and genetic disorders of neuromuscular transmission. Eur J Biochem, 2000;267:6717-6728. 53. Nakata M, Kuwabara S, Kawaguchi N et al. – Is excitation-contraction coupling impaired in myasthenia gravis? Clin Neurophysiol, 2007;118:1144-1148. 54. Nocite J – Miastenia Gravis e Anestesia. Rev Bras Anestesiol, 1990;40:443-448. 55. Baraka A, Wakid N, Mansour R et al. – Effect of neostigmine and pyridostigmine on the plasma cholinesterase activity. Br J Anaesth, 1981;53:849-851. 56. Naguib M, el Dawlatly AA, Ashour M et al. – Multivariate determinants of the need for postoperative ventilation in myasthenia gravis. Can J Anaesth, 1996;43:1006-1013. 57. Baraka A – Anaesthesia and myasthenia gravis. Can J Anaesth, 1992; 39: 476-486 58. Eisenkraft JB, Book WJ, Mann SM et al. – Resistance to succinylcholine in myasthenia gravis: a dose-response study. Anesthesiology, 1988;69:760-763. 59. Naguib M, Sari-Kouzel A, Ashour M et al. – Myasthenia gravis and pipecuronium--report of two cases. Middle East J Anesthesiol, 1992;11:381-390. 60. Itoh H, Shibata K, Nitta S – Sensitivity to vecuronium in seropositive and seronegative patients with myasthenia gravis. Anesth Analg, 2002;95:109-113. 61. Kim JM, Mangold J – Sensitivity to both vecuronium and neostigmine in a sero-negative myasthenic patient. Br J Anaesth, 1989;63:497500. 62. Nilsson E, Meretoja OA – Vecuronium dose-response and maintenance requirements in patients with myasthenia gravis. Anesthesiology, 1990;73:28-32. Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, Novembro-Dezembro, 2011

MIASTENIA GRAVIS: RELATO DE DOIS CASOS E REVISÃO DA LITERATURA

63. Smith CE, Donati F, Bevan DR – Cumulative dose-response curves for atracurium in patients with myasthenia gravis. Can J Anaesth, 1989;36:402-406. 64. Baraka A – Suxamethonium block in the myasthenic patient. Correlation with plasma cholinesterase. Anaesthesia, 1992;47:217-219. 65. Mann R, Blobner M – Neuromuscular monitoring in myasthenia gravis. Anaesthesist, 2000;49 Suppl 1:S26-28. 66. Unterbuchner C, Fink H, Blobner M – The use of sugammadex in a patient with myasthenia gravis. Anaesthesia, 2010;65:302-305. 67. de Boer HD, van Egmond J, Driessen JJ et al. – Sugammadex in patients with myasthenia gravis. Anaesthesia, 2010;65:653. 68. Tripathi M, Kaushik S, Dubey P – The effect of use of pyridostigmine and requirement of vecuronium in patients with myasthenia gravis. J Postgrad Med, 2003;49:311-314.

Resumen: Kauling ALC, Almeida MCS, Locks GF, Brunharo GM – Miastenia Gravis: Relato de dos Casos y Revisión de la Literatura. Justificativa y objetivos: La Miastenia Gravis (MG), es una enfermedad neurológica autoinmune que afecta la porción postsináptica de la unión neuromuscular. Se trata de un reto para el anestesiólogo

Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia Vol. 61, No 6, Novembro-Dezembro, 2011

en función de la diversidad de las manifestaciones de la enfermedad y por la posibilidad de complicaciones ventilatorias en el postoperatorio. El objetivo de este trabajo es demostrar la importancia de la monitorización adecuada al bloqueo neuromuscular (BNM), en virtud de las múltiples formas de presentación de la MG. Contenido: En este artículo, se describirán dos casos de pacientes con MG: uno que presentó la forma clásica de sensibilidad al bloqueante neuromuscular (BNM), y el otro con una respuesta similar a la de un paciente normal. La revisión de la literatura quedará restringida a las características de la enfermedad, y la descripción de su fisiopatología estará dirigida a las reacciones a los BNM. Conclusiones: Como conclusión, sugerimos que, en función de las múltiples formas de presentación y de tratamiento de la MG, es fundamental usar los monitores de la TNM cuando se usa BNM. Descriptores: ANESTESIA, General; BLOQUEANTE MUSCULAR, Atracurio; ENFERMIDADES, Muscular, Miastenia Gravis; MONITORACIÓN; TÉCNICAS DE MEDICIÓN, Eletromiografia.

763