O.451 Central giant cell granuloma of the jaws. A clinical study and review of the literature

O.451 Central giant cell granuloma of the jaws. A clinical study and review of the literature

122 Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery 34(2006) Suppl. S1 lichen planus (11%) and 5 cases of verrucous hyperplasia (5%). Follow-up averaged 24 mo...

55KB Sizes 0 Downloads 8 Views

122 Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery 34(2006) Suppl. S1 lichen planus (11%) and 5 cases of verrucous hyperplasia (5%). Follow-up averaged 24 months (range 1–73 months). Results: Fifty-two patients were disease-free (54%), 15 patients had small recurrences removed with subsequent laser surgeries, leading to control (16%) and 29 patients had complete recurrences of the original lesion (30%). Recurrence appeared in 13 months (2–64 months). Eleven patients developed new dysplastic lesions at distinct sites (11%) and in 8 patients occurred a malignant transformation in the same or different site of the original lesions (8%). Conclusions: Treatment of the white lesions of the oral cavity using a CO2 laser is an ideal alternative due to its effectiveness and good post-operative regime. Post-operative pain, bleeding and scar retractions are complications that may occur with this therapy. O.451 Central giant cell granuloma of the jaws. A clinical study and review of the literature G. Karakinaris, Kath. Triantafillidou, G. Venetis, K. Siochos, F. Iordanidis. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dentistry School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece Introduction and Objectives: This clinical review article intends to analyse the outcome of management of a group of 19 patients with CGCG, who were treated in our clinic. Material and Methods: A total of 19 patients were diagnosed with CGCG in the jaws and treated in our clinic. The femaleto-male ratio was 10:9. The age range was 7–60 years. The location of the lesions was mandible (11), maxilla (5), maxilla and maxillary sinus (2), and condyle of the mandible (1). All the patients treated were with curettage of the lesions, except the patient that the lesion located in the condyle, who were treated with condylectomy. Results: The follow-up range for our patients was 1–18 years. Fifteen patients are free of the disease. For the patient with condylectomy 3 years later the lesion relapsed with spread in the infratemporal fossa. The patient is under medical therapy (for 1 year) with calcitonin. Conclusions: CGCG is a localized osteolytic lesion of variably aggressive nature that affects the jaws bones. The essential microscopic component of CGCG is the presence of multinucleated giant cells distributed within a collagenous stroma having a variable cellularity. Curettage alone or combined with resection without continuity loss of the interior cortex of the mandible, is suggested as satisfactory method of treatment for mandibular lesions. For lesions in the maxilla, where the maxillary cortical plates are thin and frequently there is involvement of the maxillary sinus the treatment composed of either partial maxillectomy or curettage. O.452 Aneurysmal bone cysts of the jaws: Clinicopathological features, differential diagnosis and treatment analysis of 5 cases K. Siochos, G. Venetis, Kath. Triantafillidou, G. Karakinaris, F. Iordanidis. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dentistry School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece Introduction and Objectives: This article evaluates the clinicopathological outcomes of ABCs of the jaws in a 5-patient group who treated in our clinic, during a 14-year period. Material and Methods: All the patients were female and the age range was 7–35 years. The location of the ABCs was maxilla and maxillary sinus (3, one of these cases developed within ossifying fibroma) and mandible (2). All the patients treated with complete surgical curettage of the lesions. The one case that developed within ossifying fibroma concerned a 7-year old

Abstracts, EACFMS XVIII Congress girl. After 3 attempts of surgical curettage of the lesion in our clinic, the patient went to Germany where she was treated by radical surgery (maxillectomy), while the defect in the maxilla was closed with free vascularized bone graft, which unfortunately failed. The patient returned in our clinic and the defect was closed over again with autogenous iliac bone graft and osseointegrated implants were placed. Today the patient is 21-year old and free of the disease. Results: During the follow-up period, which ranged from 1 to 14 years no recurrences have occurred. It is obvious that ABCs presented with clinicopathological similarities of other pathological bone lesions (central giant cell granuloma, fibroosseous lesions). So the diagnosis and differential diagnosis may be a dilemma. Conclusions: We believe that thorough curettage, with a careful follow-up, is the treatment of choice for the ABCs of the jaws. The histopathological characteristics of the specimen should be carefully studied, as the presence of an associated aggressive intraosseous lesion could differentiate the therapeutic approaches. O.453 Myxofibroma of the jaws: is partial resection of mandible or maxilla still the therapy of choice? N. Brueggemann, G. Gehrke. Department of Cranio-, Maxillo-, Facial- and Plastic Surgery, Henriettenstiftung, Hannover, Germany Introduction and Objectives: The odontogenic myxofibroma is a rare benign, locally invasive growing tumour, that does not occur outside of the jaws. Because of the local invasive behavior of the myxofibroma, some authors presume a latent malignant potential and prefer a primary radical treatment of those tumours. Material and Methods: During the last 10 years 5 patients with myxofibroma in the jaw region underwent surgical treatment at our clinic. One patient received primary treatment in an other hospital. Results: Two patients had large tumours in the maxilla and 3 patients suffered from large tumors of the mandible. The mean age of the patients was 46.8 years, the patients with tumours in the mandible were younger (mean 37 years). All patients were male. The average follow-up time was 7 years. Conclusions: The state of art in diagnostics and surgical treatment is reviewed by literature and compared with the outcome of our study. Though the most authors call the myxofibroma a benign tumour, one patient died of locally aggressive behaviour of the tumour. Due to our experience the primary treatment for myxofibroma of the mandible does not need to be radical. Myxofibroma of the maxilla and recurrent myxofibroma of the mandible should always be treated by partial resection. In case of the need of partial resection of the mandible, reconstruction by a microvascular fibula bone graft is a safe and well-accepted method. O.454 Ameloblastoma arising in a 5 month child: A severe exploding lesion A. Petti, F. Bergaminelli, R. De Santis. UOC ODT – Chirurgia maxillo-facciale ASL SA 1 Ospedali Riuniti delle 3 Valli P.O.Umberto 1, Nocera Inferiore, Italy The ameloblastoma is a usually non-malignant lesion of the jaw that rarely affects children. Ralely it is reported in very young patients. The most common age is 15–30 years. We present a 5 month child referred to our Hospital for an important swelling in the upper jaw that was growing daily more and more. The mother stated that his dentist 3 days before had extracted a ‘denticulus’ from a swelling reddish mass on the left side. An-