Oxford Textbook of Movement Disorders (Oxford Textbooks in Clinical Neurology)

Oxford Textbook of Movement Disorders (Oxford Textbooks in Clinical Neurology)

e u r o p e a n j o u r n a l o f p a e d i a t r i c n e u r o l o g y x x x ( 2 0 1 4 ) 1 e2 Official Journal of the European Paediatric Neurology ...

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e u r o p e a n j o u r n a l o f p a e d i a t r i c n e u r o l o g y x x x ( 2 0 1 4 ) 1 e2

Official Journal of the European Paediatric Neurology Society

Book review Oxford Textbook of Movement Disorders (Oxford Textbooks in Clinical Neurology), David J. Burn. Oxford University Press, Hardback (2013). 376pp. £125/V138/US$225, ISBN: 9780199609536.

Why would a paediatric neurologist (or a trainee like myself) want to read an adult-oriented neurology book on movement disorders? Or, actually why would paediatric neurologists bother to have any knowledge on adult neurology? Well, spending time in adult neurology is well established as being important in child neurology training. Trainees need to become well acquainted with the wide range of the fascinating and ever interesting neurological pathologies that either stem from early childhood or have their somehow lookalikes in the paediatric world. This is in addition to the transferable clinical skills that one acquires. After all, we have all been warned that “children are not mini adults” but are adults big children? Probably not (thankfully)! This textbook on movement disorders is intended for general neurologists and subspecialists alike e though paediatric neurologists not mentioned! However, having read it, I think that ‘we’ ought to be included. The book has 31 chapters with a refreshing blend of basic science and clinical concepts with clear emphasis on key advances and further research areas. The first chapter is an interesting historical overview of movement disorders and how these conditions were conceptualized in ancient civilizations with particular reference to the evolution of neuroanatomy and neuropathology from even before the days when the ‘vermis’ was likened to an

“earthworm” living in our ventricles! Did you know that “Dancing Hysteria” was the name given to major chorea (aka non-infectious chorea)? I didn’t! The second chapter comes as a succinct authoritative introduction to the subject by giving an overview of the clinical approach to the movement disorder patient. What I liked about it, is the personal account of the experienced author on how he would normally take a helpful history and examine the patient in a focused and an astute manner. The chapter is nicely concluded by “Key points in making management decisions” which is quite useful. The following two chapters give an up to date, elegant and well-referenced review of the neuroanatomical and functional aspects of the basal ganglia, cerebellar, brainstem and spinal systems and their complex connections and pathways, a must-read for those interested in movement disorders as a subspecialty. The chapter on the electrophysiological approach to movement disorder brings to the reader a practical guide on the clinical utility of neurophysiology in the diagnostic work up of patients with disorders such as tremors, mycolonus and dystonia. Although perhaps not fully applicable to the average paediatric patient due to their invasiveness and need for cooperation, the mere understanding of the physiological basis of these tests in various conditions comes as a real aid for the clinician. The chapter on structural and functional imaging mainly focuses on Parkinsonian disorders with a couple of pages on Huntington’s disease and dystonia. Again, this probably comes under the ‘nice-to-know-and-may-be-need-to-know-one-day’ category as far as paediatric neurology is concerned. A whole chapter has been devoted to genetic techniques and their impact in the field of movement disorders. While it takes the reader through an enlightening journey of how the various neurogenetic diagnostic methods have developed over the last decades, their current limitations and their future, this review feels rather dry, generic and compacted with technical details. Over eight chapters, the authors discuss the different syndromes and mimics of Parkinsonism delivering to the reader a wealth of concepts and evidence-based approaches when available. Some paediatric neurology trainees (myself included!) may find it tempting to skim through some of these chapters, yet I would strongly recommend at least fully reading the chapter titled “The many faces of Parkinsonisim: A review of the Parkinson look-alike syndromes” where an excellent account is presented on the more familiar conditions of dopa-responsive dystonia, rapid-onset dystoniaparkinsonism, panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and many more. It is certainly fair to say that the rest of the book is more relevant to paediatric neurology as it provides a

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e u r o p e a n j o u r n a l o f p a e d i a t r i c n e u r o l o g y x x x ( 2 0 1 4 ) 1 e2

comprehensive review of the not uncommonly seen disorders of tremors, primary and secondary dystonias, the choreas and mycolconus amidst others. It is appetite-enhancing and certainly heart-warming to see that individual full chapters are written on paroxysmal movement disorders (including episodic ataxias), Wilson disease, tic disorders and stereotypies, psychogenic movement disorders and hereditary and acquired cerebellar ataxias to name a few. Sounds familiar? Rest assured that most of the time you will find something that gives you a ‘taste from home’ in this book from the ‘molecular basis of these individual conditions’ to ‘childhood clinical presentations’ and much more. It is evident that each chapter is written by experts and is presented in a logical and easy-to-follow layout with plenty of information boxes, tables, figures and the so-called “Top clinical tips”. When you purchase the book you will get free access to the online version of the book which is great news to the growing number of the virtual world dwellers amongst us. You can access good quality videos too though not many enough to

satisfy your hunger. References are linked to Pubmed and CrossRef which is always a bonus. Moreover, you can easily download figures, diagrams etc. for your last-minute PowerPoint presentations. The bad news is that your subscription expires within one year from signing up, to the disappointment of many readers. One final thought: while making a diagnosis of Parkinsonism or Huntington’s disease in the occasional child may seem like a ‘long shot’, one could passionately argue that long shots are probably the ‘bread and butter’ of child neurology anyway. Would I recommend this book to my paediatric neurology colleagues? Yes! Mohamed O.E. Babiker Fraser of Allander Neurosciences Unit, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, Glasgow G3 8SJ, UK E-mail address: [email protected] 1090-3798/$ e see front matter http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpn.2014.01.009