Paper 139: Biceps Tenodesis: An Evaluation of Four Fixation Techniques

Paper 139: Biceps Tenodesis: An Evaluation of Four Fixation Techniques

ABSTRACTS weakness secondary to pre-existing MRI documented fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff musculature. Conclusions: Arthroscopic rotator cuff...

44KB Sizes 4 Downloads 89 Views

ABSTRACTS weakness secondary to pre-existing MRI documented fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff musculature. Conclusions: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using corkscrew parachute tissue anchors achieve good to excellent results in 96.5% of patients. This retrospective study is the largest series involving knotless suture fixation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs. Paper 139: Biceps Tenodesis: An Evaluation of Four Fixation Techniques AUGUSTUS D. MAZZOCCA, FARMINGTON, CT, USA STEPHEN A. SANTANGELO, FARMINGTON, CT, USA DOUG ADAMS, FARMINGTON, CT, USA ANTHONY ROMEO, CHICAGO, IL, USA JAMES BICOS, FARMINGTON, CT, USA PRESENTER ROBERT A. ARCIERO, FARMINGTON, CT, USA · University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA Proximal biceps tenodesis provides pain relief for disorders of the biceps tendon while maintaining the length tension relationship of the muscle, in turn maximizing elbow function and cosmesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanics of bone tunnel, suture anchor arthroscopic and open interference screw proximal biceps tenodesis techniques. Sixteen fresh frozen cadavers were randomly assigned to four groups, Subpectoral bone tunnel (SBT), Subpectoral interference screw (SIS), suture anchor (SA), and arthroscopic interference screw (AIS) after bone density measurements. Fifty percent of the average failure load (100N) was then used to evaluate the fixation displacement during 5000 load cycles (1 Hz). After cyclic loading an axial load to failure test was conducted on the same specimens. The SIS had significantly (p⬍.05) less cyclic displacement (1.62⫹0.66mm) than the SBT (8.94⫹3.05mm). The ultimate failure loads after 5000 cycles (by rank, reamer and screw) was SIS (257⫹79), (AIS) (246⫹24N), SBT (243⫹59N), and SA (185⫹24). These differences in failure load were not statistically significant. The subpectoral interference screw tenodesis (SIS) method has less displacement with repetitive submaximal loads than standard bone tunnel, arthroscopic, and suture anchor tenodesis. Paper 140: Arthroscopic Cuff Repair: Clinical Results and CT-Arthrography Assessment of Tendons Healing ELIAS DAGHER, PARIS, FRANCE, PRESENTER FRANCOIS BONNOMET, STRASBOURG, FRANCE JEAN-FRANCOIS KEMPF, STRASBOURG, FRANCE · Hautepierre Hospital, Strasbourg, France

e147

Introduction: Arthroscopic cuff repair has gained popularity during the last years and its indications became larger with the surgeon’s experience. We report the results of arthroscopic repair of non retracted full-thickness supraspinatus and infraspinatus tears. Material and Methods: 87 patients underwent arthroscopic repair of their supraspinatus and/or infraspinatus tendons in our department in 2001 and 2002. 50 patients operated by the same surgeon with complete pre-operative assessment were analyzed. Mean age at operation was 54 years and mean follow-up was 24 months. Pre-operatively and at the last follow-up clinical evaluation concerned the Constant score and radiological evaluation used CT-arthrography. Patients were questioned about their rehabilitation period and their subjective satisfaction was noted on a scale between 0 and 10. Results: The average Constant score progression from 46,4 pre-operatively to 84,2 post-operatively was significant, especially for pain. Strenght was mainly correlated to tendon healing. The rate of tendon healing was high and comparable to those reported with open procedures. Satisfaction was very high (8,6/10) and wasn’t correlated to tendon healing. Mean post operative delay to full recovery was about 6 months. Conclusion: Arthroscopic cuff repair is a safe and efficient procedure. We still recommend it in the treatment of non retracted full-thickness supraspinatus and infraspinatus tears. Paper 141: Comparison of Valgus Load Radiography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Medial Instability of the Elbow DENISE EYGENDAAL, NIJMEGEN, NETHERLANDS PRESENTER WILLEM R. OBERMANN, LEIDEN, NETHERLANDS · Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, Netherlands Comparison of valgus load radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in medial instability of the elbow in Dutch patients.In this study eighteen Dutch athletes are described with a medial instability of the elbow joint due to insufficiency of the medial collateral ligament. History and findings at physical and radiological examination are presented. Fifteen of eighteen showed increase of the ulno-humeral joint space at dynamic radiography under valgus load in comparison to the other, uninjured joint. Magnetic resonance imaging of eleven of these fifteen elbows revealed rupture of the medial collateral ligament or avulsion of the medial collateral ligament. Four patients had sensory ulnar nerve symptoms, two of them revealed abnormalities of the ulnar nerve at electromyography. Dynamic radiography under valgus load seems to be the diagnostic tool of choice in chronic medial col-