PERCEIVED ACCEPTABILITY OF A PSYCHOSOCIAL INTERVENTION TO REDUCE STRESS IN VIETNAMESE DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

PERCEIVED ACCEPTABILITY OF A PSYCHOSOCIAL INTERVENTION TO REDUCE STRESS IN VIETNAMESE DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

P1164 Poster Presentations: Tuesday, July 18, 2017 dependence”, “Function overload in the face of Patient demand” and “Social Isolation and Self-suf...

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P1164

Poster Presentations: Tuesday, July 18, 2017

dependence”, “Function overload in the face of Patient demand” and “Social Isolation and Self-sufficiency as Caregiver”. Conclusions: The literature showed no models corresponding to the one found in this study, corroborating the initial idea that the interindividual approach data cannot be directly applied to the individual and that further studies are necessary in this area. P3-492

PERCEIVED ACCEPTABILITY OF A PSYCHOSOCIAL INTERVENTION TO REDUCE STRESS IN VIETNAMESE DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

Oanh Meyer1, Jennifer Dang2, Mihoka Fukurai3, Janis Ho3, Pim Limtiaco4, Hedda Nguyen3, Nolan Zane3, Ladson Hinton1, 1University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA, USA; 2University of the Pacific, Sacramento, CA, USA; 3University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA; 4 Sacramento City College, Sacramento, CA, USA. Contact e-mail: [email protected] Background: Vietnamese American dementia caregivers may face greater burden and stress compared to non-Hispanic White caregivers, particularly because of existing socioeconomic, health, and healthcare access disparities. Few studies have been done on how cultural factors impact intervention development and adaptation. This qualitative study examines key stakeholders’ views on a culturally adapted, communitybased intervention meant to reduce stress and enhance the health of Vietnamese dementia caregivers and care recipients. Methods: We used a community-engaged approach to adapting and refining our intervention. We conducted semi-structured individual interviews with 15 stakeholders in the larger Sacramento area. Participants included Vietnamese dementia family caregivers, health and mental health professionals, and community leaders. They provided their perspectives on a six-week, group-based psychosocial intervention developed from preliminary data and based on social contextual and stress and coping models. Interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analyzed for recurring themes using Dedoose software. Results: Several concepts/themes emerged from the analyses, including (1) the lack of education/awareness about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias; (2) the importance of empowering intervention participants and the community; (3) local religious/spiritual aspects, and (4) specific recommendations for the intervention. Almost all the participants discussed the need for more education about dementia and about resources available to help caregivers. Participants also felt that religion and spirituality were important to the intervention, not just because caregivers used them to cope with stress, but because support by local religious institutions would be valuable for the intervention. Lastly, and addressing a major goal of the study, we obtained several intervention recommendations. These included culturally appropriate strategies for engagement and recruitment of intervention participants (e.g., establishing credibility), and creating an intervention that provides caregivers with tangible skills and resources. Conclusions: Engaging an underserved, stressed population of dementia caregivers in intervention research is a challenging task. To do so, community input and involvement were critical to providing an intervention that would be effective and sustainable.

P3-493

EXPLORING PSYCHOLOGICAL WELLBEING IN WORKING FAMILY CARERS

Rachel Clarke1, Henglien Lisa Chen2, Jennifer M. Rusted1, 1 University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom; 2University of Sussex, United Kingdom. Contact e-mail: [email protected] Background: Enabling family carers to live well with dementia is a

key UK policy objective (Getting in on the act, 2014). The abolition

of the default retirement age (Age UK, 2015) means that there are likely to be increasing numbers of family carers who face the challenge of sustained care and work. Surprisingly little is known about the profile of the increasing numbers of working family carers for people with dementia. This study asks what factors associate with psychological health and quality of life for working family carers. Methods: The study employs a mixed-methods approach using a two-stage process, to explore the psychological wellbeing of working family carers. In the first stage, structured questionnaires capture psychological wellbeing, everyday functioning (basic memory and attention) and work-life balance. In the second stage, in-depth semi-structured interviews introduce an object of discussion selected by working carers, to represent the work and life balance. Through interviews, carers discuss why they have selected the object, and prompted where necessary, to discuss successful examples of combining work and care, work and care conflicts. In this poster, we describe preliminary data from the qualitative (stage 2) study. Results: Early qualitative findings suggest that organisers are essential for keeping on top of work and care commitments [..‘synchronisation...that’s enabled me to be where I’m supposed to be’], particularly when the demands of work and care come into conflict. The support of others was another important factor which enabled one carer to balance both roles, where the support offered with care by their partner means that they: ‘..could not hold down the job [..] without him’. For working carers, employment also comes as a respite from the care role. However, current caregiving support practices were a source of anxiety: ‘Nobody seems particularly interested in us. Yeah.we’re just there doing it.until we can’t’. Conclusions: Personal planners are frequently selected to represent the ‘juggle’ associated with balancing multiple roles, and have been synchronised with co-caring partners, to remain alert to tight and conflicting schedules. Ensuing interviews will reveal whether these early findings are common themes expressed by working carers in dementia care.

P3-494

QUALITY OF LIFE FOR BRAZILIAN FAMILY CAREGIVERS OF PATIENTS WITH ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

Ricardo S. Komatsu1 and Caroline Komatsu2, 1FAMEMA Marilia Medical School, Marilia, Brazil; 2UNIRIO, Escola de Medicina e Cirurgia, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Contact e-mail: [email protected] Background: Caring for a family member with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is an assignment that can produce negative effects on the caregiver’s quality of life (QoL). Methods: We applied the WHOQOL– bref instrument in 73 family caregivers of patients with AD (McKhann et al, 2011) in a private outpatient clinic in Marilia, Sao Paulo State, Brazil, and we collected demographic and caring data. Results: The profile of the family caregiver was: mean age: 59,2 years (26 to 96 years-old); gender: 58 (79,4%) female and 15 (20,6%) male caregivers; education: 3 (4,1%) with 1-4 years, 4 (5,4%) with 5-8 years and 6 (8,2%) with 9–11 years and 60 (82,3%) with 12 years or more. The patient’s profile revealed: mean age: 80,3 years, (56 to 101 years-old); gender: 42 (57,5%) female and 31 (42,5%) male patients; education: 5 (6,8%) illiterate, 16 (21,9%) with 1-4 years, 11 (15%) with 5-8 years and 11 (15%) with 9-11 years and 30 (43,3%) with 12 years or more. QoL: 39 (53,4%) family caregivers presented low and 34 (46,6%) good quality of life. Time: 9 (12,3%) family caregivers spent less