Practical Dental Anatomy and Tooth Carving

Practical Dental Anatomy and Tooth Carving

Department of Orthodontic Abstracts and Reviews Edited by DR. EGaN NEUSTADT, NEW YORK CITY All communications concerning further information about ab...

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Department of Orthodontic Abstracts and Reviews Edited by DR. EGaN NEUSTADT, NEW YORK CITY

All communications concerning further information about abstracted material and the acceptance of articles or books for consideration in this department should be addressed to Dr. Egan Neustadt. 133 East Fifty-Eighth Street. New York City.

Practical Dental Anatomy and Tooth Carving. By Jacob R. Schwartz, D.D.S. When we observe the individual tooth, there are a number of important features that command our attention, among them its form, quality, size and position relative to adjoining and opposing teeth. The most important of these is its form. The others are usually obvious to the trained observer. Observation shows that in an alarmingly large number of restorations operators either are not conscious of correct tooth form or are inexcusably careless in their work. Such a work as Dr. Schwartz's is to be commended in the strongest terms both to students for whom it is primarily intended and for the careful study of the more experienced dentist. The knowledge of tooth form is so basic that all the dental schools now have courses in tooth carving. I have known several students who have been dismissed from schools having high standards because they did not or could not grasp the importance of being able to reproduce correct tooth form. To be sure, this deficiency is usually accompanied by poor technic in other work. A student who cannot master correct tooth form is no more fitted to practice dentistry than is a student who does not know the safe dose of narcotics and anesthetics. This work is commendable because it shows so graphically each detail of the particular type of tooth which is being considered, the importance of each anatomical landmark, contour, marginal ridges, cusps, grooves, etc. They are all important to occlusion-in taking up the proper amount of space in the arch, shedding food that would otherwise pack between the teeth and establishing normal contacts with their antagonists. I feel this carefully prepared book should have a wide acceptance. Albert W. Crosby.

A Dictionary of Dental Science and Art. By William B. Dunning and S. Ellsworth Davenport. Philadelphia, 1936, P. Blakiston's Son & Co. The outstanding feature of this dictionary is the illustrations. They help to identify objects which would be incomprehensible by mere explanation through words. Anatomic and histologic terms are more easily understood in this manner. The portraits of persons conspicuous in the history of dentistry add a human interest to the book which is usually not associated with 420