Pretreatment of seawater by flocculation and settling for particulates removal

Pretreatment of seawater by flocculation and settling for particulates removal

Desalination, 58 ( 1 9 8 6 ) 2 2 7 - - 2 4 1 227 Elsevier Science P u b l i s h e r s B.V., A m s t e r d a m - - P r i n t e d in T h e N e t h e r...

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Desalination, 58 ( 1 9 8 6 ) 2 2 7 - - 2 4 1

227

Elsevier Science P u b l i s h e r s B.V., A m s t e r d a m - - P r i n t e d in T h e N e t h e r l a n d s

PRETREATMENT OF SEAWATER BY FLOCCULATION AND SETTLING FOR PARTICULATES REMOVAL

A. A D I N a n d C. K L E I N - B A N A Y

Human Environmental Sciences, Graduate School o f Applied Science and Technology, The Hebrew University o f Jerusalem, Jerusalem (Israel) Tel. (02) 221281 (Received O c t o b e r 25, 1 9 8 5 ; in revised f o r m D e c e m b e r 29, 1 9 8 5 )

SUMMARY

Seawater flocculation was studied in this investigation as an aid in preventing fouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes by particulates. The behavior of clays in seawater and their possible use in the pretreatment process was also investigated. Mediterranean seawater samples were f o u n d to have a salinity of about 36%0, pH of 7.9--8.2 and turbidity of 1.0--17.5 NTU (Nephelometric Turbidity Units). After 1--3 h of quiescent settling, 30--50% of the turbidity remained and then stabilized, pointing to a possible advantage of lagooning prior to further treatment. Tests carried o u t with artificial seawater, as well as natural seawater, were carried out to study particle removal in general, and algae and clay in particular. Different conventional and polyelectrolytic flocculants were used in the experiments. The best clarification was f o u n d using alum and an anionic polymer in combination, resulting in 2 0 - 1 0 0 particles per ml and a turbidity of less than 1 NTU. It was also f o u n d t h a t particle size distribution measurements m a y provide a better picture of the quality and mechanism of treatment.

INTRODUC~ON

It has long been established that particulate matter can cause mechanical fouling in reverse osmosis membrane units by being caught in the membrane fibers or on its surface. As the water passes through, these substances are concentrated and a process similar to coagulation--flocculation takes place. Neutralization of the particles' charge and coagulation of additional matter m a y occur, while the trapped m a t t e r acts as a nucleus for polymerization or flocculation. As the rate of flow increases so does the rate of fouling since more nuclei are created and, thus, the rate of growth increases [1, 2].

0011-9164/86/$03.50

© 1 9 8 6 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.

228 Despite the high salt c o n t e n t of seawater, particles of colloidal nature do n o t tend to coagulate and settle on their own. The main c o m p o n e n t s of particulate matter that m a y be f o u n d in coastal water are microorganisms, detritus, quartz and clay minerals. Numerous studies have proven that there is enough surface-active organic matter to be adsorbed on the surface of the particles, thus affecting the predictions of the double-layer theory and allowing particles to remain discrete [ 3--7 ]. Usually filtration is used as a pretreatment for the removal of particulate matter from seawater. Different case reports of pilot plants and full scale plants in operation have been published [8--11], and most of them utilize either in-line (contact) coagulation or conventional clarification as a destabilization means prior to the filtration step. For either m e t h o d preliminary testing of flocculants is highly r e c o m m e n d e d due to similar attachment mechanisms [12, 1 3 ] . The above articles point o u t the important role of flocculants in the pretreatment of seawater and, together with the existing need for the improvement of the design and economics of the systems involved, call for more systematic research in this area. Our research was aimed at studying seawater flocculation by: (a) chemical, physical and biological characterization of seawater (in this case Mediterranean water) and particulates in relation to flocculation mechanisms; (b) study of clays and algal behaviour in a seawater chemical environment; and (c) study of seawater flocculation as a m e t h o d for the removal of particulates or as a preparatory destabilizing step before filtration. EXPERIMENTAL The flocculation o f algae and clays was first studied in artificial seawater. Water was prepared according to the analysis of salt c o n t e n t of real seawater made by L y m a n and Fleming [21]. Clay (bentonite and kaolinite) suspensions were prepared b y dissolving 2.5 g clay in 500 ml distilled water and then mixed at 2 5 r p m for 2 0 m i n , at 2 5 0 r p m for l min and 3 0 s sonication. The alga chosen was Nannochlorus, a non-flagellate spherical cell f o u n d free-floating in the water. The tested flocculants were aluminum sulphate (alum) and various polyelectrolytes. The tests were carried o u t in a jar test apparatus consisting of six paddles with 11 beakers of sample. Each "jar" contained a different concentration of coagulant tested. The standard test involved 1 min, 1 0 0 r p m rapid mixing and 2 0 m i n , 25 rpm slow mixing, followed b y quiescent settling. After 30' of settling, turbidity and pH were measured and for certain tests particle size distribution was determined. Such main characteristics of seawater and of particles as salinity, pH, alkalinity, total dissolved solids, suspended solids, turbidity, particle size distribution, algal c o u n t and identification were determined. Samples were taken from different beaches on the Mediterranean coastline. Analytical

229 methods were those of Strickland and Parsons [14] and Standard Methods [15]. A H I A C / R O Y C O particle size analyzer, model PC-320, was used to measure particle size distribution in the 4 - - 3 0 0 p m range. This instrument was f o u n d to be very useful for this t y p e of work [ 1 6 ] . In addition, scanning electron micrographs were made of the residuals of various samples filtrated through a 0 . 4 5 p m MiUipore filter. Turbidity measurements t o o k place using a HACH nephelometer. The last stage o f experimental work consisted of flocculation tests in the jar test apparatus with Mediterranean seawater using alum, ferric chloride and various polyelectrolytes. RESULTS Artificial seawater Clays were tested with a double purpose: (1) to represent the inorganic (mineral) suspended solids c o m p o n e n t of seawater, and (2) to examine the possibility of using clay as a flocculant aid b y increasing the number of particles present or as material for absorption, improving flocculation. In the first stage, settling tests were carried o u t with different concentrations of clay in artificial seawater. Within a few hours most of the clay had settled and after 24 h the residual turbidity was less than 1 NTU for all concentrations of clay, pointing at very unstable conditions. Flocculation tests with three concentrations of bentonite (10, 50 and 200 mg/1) were performed with different flocculants such as alum, cationic and anionic polymers and combinations of these. Fig. 1 shows flocculation curves for tests with alum alone. At a b o u t 25--35 mg/1 of alum the turbidity removal reaches a maximum (60--85% removal, 0.75--1.75 NTU residual). A sharp peak, as is usually f o u n d for polyelectrolytes b u t n o t for alum in surface water, appears at the o p t i m u m alum dose, presenting a quick overdose phenomenon. Flocculation curves for similar tests performed with a combination of o p t i m u m alum doses and polyelectrolyte (Magnafloc LT 25) are presented in Fig. 2. Maximum turbidity removal was 77--95% with the typical p h e n o m e n o n of a single peak for optimal polymer dosage. It can also be observed from the graphs that particle counts followed the turbidity results pretty closely. The range of algae concentrations in seawater is usually 1.2--2.6 × 103 cells/ml [17, 18]. As mentioned above, Nannochlorus was used as the representative alga in these experiments. Concentrations of this alga of less than 103 cells/ml did n o t affect turbidity. Fig. 3 shows the results of flocculation tests of artificial seawater containing 705--2 X l 0 s algal cells/ml with alum. The o p t i m u m alum concentration was similar (20 mg/1) over most of the algal concentration. The flocs were usually small and light. Overdosing occurred at slightly higher doses. Turbidity and particle size distribution were measured. Turbidity removal was relatively

230 low (45--75%). Since there was n o direct way to measure removal o f algae it is hard to say what percentage o f algae was removed. The use o f 0.05 mg/l anionic polyelectrolyte (superfloc A l l 0 ) with alum improved the turbidity removal (84%) and gave larger flocs.

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Fig. 4 shows the flocculation curves when both algae and clay were added to artificial seawater. A larger plateau of good removal was obtained here as compared to algae alone. The optimum dose was 25--35 mg/1 alum. The lowest final turbidities were for 10mg/1 clay, but they were higher for no

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233 clay addition (0.36 and 0.40 NTU as compared to 0.45 and 0.42 NTU for 10 a and l 0 s cells/ml respectively).

Mediterranean seawater characteristics Eleven samples o f seawater were taken from a number of beaches. Table I shows the date and location of sampling and some of the quality parameters measured for each sample. As can be seen, salinity, as measured by titration with silver nitrate, ranged from 30.06--38.88%0, total suspended solids were 7.6--35.4 mg/1 and turbidity 1.0--17.5 NTU. High turbidity was due to the presence of sand. pH was in the normal range for seawater (7.9--8.2) as was the number of algae, 62--2650 cells/ml. Total particle counts for 4--300 pm ranged from 1072--5292 particles/ml. Algae identified included Nannochlorous, Asterionella, Nitzchia and Chlamydomonaa All these algae are also f o u n d in polluted estuaries and were present in most o f the samples examined. In addition, to characterize the particles in seawater in the range of less than 4 #m, electron micrographs were made using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Particles in the colloidal size range of less than 1 pm and even as small as 0.1/zm were measured. These were usually crystallites, although some particles were of undefined shape. Matsumura et al. [19] indicated that the crystallites are likely aluminum silicate clay particles and perhaps algae. A settling test was carried out for each sample in order to determine the a m o u n t of settleable solids. Fig. 5 shows tests for several samples of seawater. Turbidity was measured at varying intervals during a 48 h period. The samples started with a large range of turbidities: 1--12 NTU. After 1--3 h the turbidity dropped sharply (30--50%) and after 48 h only 12--50% of the initial turbidity remained (0.5--1.5 NTU). The significance of these results in planning pretreatment is that it may be useful to have a primary settling basin with 1--3 h residence time before flocculation or direct filtration. Fig. 6 shows results for the settling of sample G (see Table I) to which several concentrations of clay were added (10, 150, and 200 mg/1) w i t h o u t any chemical addition. After 2 3 h of settling, the appropriate turbidities approached each other (1.7--2.4 NTU) and after 47 h t h e y ranged from 1.0 to 1.5 NTU, while the sample that contained no clay had the lowest final turbidity. These results indicate that the addition of clay considerably improves the percentage sedimentation, as could be expected from flocculation kinetics, b u t does n o t improve the clarification o f seawater by settling in absolute numbers. Flocculation o f natural seawater Flocculation tests were carried o u t with alum and ferric chloride. Comstock [11] considered the latter more effective but the results f o u n d in this work do n o t indicate it clearly (one m a y bear in mind that iron itself is considered

234 TABLE I SUMMARY OF RESULTS OF CHARACTERIZATION OF SEAWATER Sample

Date of sampling

Location of sampling

Salinity °/oo by titration

Salinity °/~o by density

TDS mg/l 180°C

pH

Turbidity NTU

A

14/12/82

Tel Aviv near the opera

37.49 (21.31)*

ND+

ND

8.2

11.5--17.!

B

15/1/83

Jaffa Port

35.59 (20.20)

ND

ND

7.9

4.9

C

23/2/83

Ashelon desalination plant

34.39 (19.5)

ND

27 760

8.2

8.0

D

10/3/83

Jaffa Port

30.06 (16.99)

ND

28 860

8.1

5.7

Rishon L e Zion Beach

35.04 (19.88)

ND

38 160

8.0

2.0

Gordon Beach -Tel Aviv

37.87 (21.53)

37.1

36 870

ND

1.9

E**

4/6/83

F**

18/6/83

G

5/7/83

Ashkelon desalination plant

36.76 (20.88)

41.4

41 960

7.96

2.4--3.0

H**

9/7/83

Rishon Le -Zion Beach

34.28 (19.40)

41.0

43 810

8.26

1.0

I

21/8/83

Nof Yam Beach

36.14 (20.52)

39.4

27 590

8.2

2.1

J**

18/10/83

Rishon Le -Zion Beach

38.88 (21.33)

41.4

42 130

8.15

1.2

* Chlorinity by titration. + N D - - Not Done. ** Temperature taken at time of sampling for samples E, F, H and J was 27, 28, 28 and 25°C, respectively.

t o b e a f o u l i n g a g e n t ) . F e r r i c c h l o r i d e gave s l i g h t l y l a r g e r f l o c s t h a n a l u m b u t i n b o t h cases ( w h e n u s e d as sole f l o c c u l a n t s ) t h e f l o c s w e r e s m a l l , l i g h t a n d s l o w t o s e t t l e . Fig. 7 s h o w s , f o r e x a m p l e , f l o c c u l a t i o n c u r v e s f o r t w o seawater samples flocculated with a l u m i n u m sulfate a n d ferric chloride. S u m m a r i z i n g all t h e t e s t s p e r f o r m e d , t h e m a x i m u m t u r b i d i t y r e m o v a l w a s 4 0 - - 8 0 % d e p e n d i n g o n i n i t i a l t u r b i d i t y as w e l l as c l a r i f i c a t i o n . F o r all s a m p l e s t h e o p t i m u m a l u m d o s a g e r a n g e w a s 3 0 - - 5 0 m g / 1 a n d t h e FeC1 s d o s a g e

235

Total suspended solids mg/1 9 18.4

Volatile suspended solids mg/1 4.4 --

Particle count per ml (4--300 p m )

Total alkalinity per ml as CaCO3

Algae cells per ml

Phosphorus rag/1

Optimal alum dose mg/1

ND

135

ND

ND

40

ND

133

ND

ND

30

41.5

6.8

4373

148

ND

ND

30

9.8

5.2

5292

145

ND

ND

40

7.6

2.9

2964

145

625

0.008

30

10.8

5.6

2677

ND

2650

0.029

30

9.6

4.6

2580

145

460

ND

35

1072,

147

63

ND

30--35

1824

143

2000

ND

50

1420/1855

158

1100

ND

30

ND

ND

35.4

8.7

30.4

24.2

r a n g e 2 0 - - 5 0 mg/1. O v e r d o s i n g o c c u r r e d r a t h e r c l o s e t o t h e o p t i m u m d o s e , g i v i n g a s m a l l p l a t e a u , w h i l e c o n v e n t i o n a l c o a g u l a n t s in s u r f a c e w a t e r u s u a l l y give a w i d e r r a n g e o f o p t i m u m t u r b i d i t y r e m o v a l . T h e l o w e s t p a r t i c l e c o u n t s for treatment with alum were 42--237 particles/ml (up to 95% removal). pH decreased linearly with increasing coagulant doses (little more than 1 u n i t f o r 1 0 0 mg/1 o f c o a g u l a n t ) . F e r r i c c h l o r i d e w a s s l i g h t l y m o r e i n f l u e n t i a l in this respect.

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Fig. 5a. Settling tests for seawater samples A--D. A is represented by two curves: A for after mixing of sample and A' for mixing and 15 rain settling of sample before txansfex to settling test. Fig. 5b. ,qettling tests for seawater samples E--J.

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Fig. 6. Settling tests in seawater sample G, containing various concentrations o f Bentonite Ramon.

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The best results for particle removal by flocculation were f o u n d when alum was used with an anionic polyelectrolyte. The flocs formed were larger, settled more quickly and formed a more compact precipitate than alum alone. The most effective polymers (out of 16 tested) were Magnafloc LT25 (0.05--0.1mg/1) and Superfloc A1839 (0.01--0.05 mg/l). Superfloc A-110 (0.025--0.05 mg/1) was also effective (e.g. Fig. 8). All three flocculants are

239 p e r m i t t e d for use in drinking water by the U.S. Health authorities. The presented experimental findings indicate a clear case for optimal p o l y m e r dosage, in accordance with previous works done with polyelectrolytes [ 1 2 ] . Although the i m p r o v e m e n t in t ur bi di t y due to addition o f polyelectrolytes is small, c o m p a r e d to t r e a t m e n t with alum alone t he i m p r o v e m e n t in the flocs properties is significant, and can be o f great effect in actual plants. Clay, in concentrations o f up to 400 mg/1, was f u r t h e r tested f o r use as an aid in flocculation with alum. It was f o u n d t hat it did n o t significantly improve turbidity removal whereas a m u c h larger precipitate was f o r m e d . According to work d o n e on sewage t r e a t m e n t by Narkis et al. [20] higher clay co n cen tr at i ons m a y be needed in order to obtain improved treatment. However, this creates t he problem o f massive sludge removal or storage. Turbidity

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DISCUSSION Th e best clarification by flocculation o f seawater at different clay concentrations was f o u n d with alum and an anionic polymer. This c o m b i n a t i o n gave larger, m o r e stable flocs than those with aluminum alone. This suggests t h a t the anionic p o l y e l e c t r o l y t e is likely to act as a flocculating agent via chemical interaction and bridging. Algae do n o t significantly c ont r i but e t o the t urbi di t y o f seawater at usual concentrations n o r are algae always c o u n t e d one to one by a particle counter. This depends on t he size o f t he algae and the det ect i on limits o f the particle counter. Percent t ur bi di t y removals o f algae-containing seawater were lower than for clays. However, this m a y or m a y n o t reflect similar removal of algae. Since no simple and reliable m e t h o d could be f o u n d t o m o n i t o r

240 algal concentrations, none was used. The addition of clay did n o t seem to improve the removal of algae. Alum with an anionic polyelectrolyte gave better t r e a t m e n t than alum alone. Settling tests indicate that an initial clarifier in the pretreatment of seawater could help if it allowed for 1--3 h settling. Settling with the addition of clay in seawater was similar to t h a t in artificial seawater but did n o t actually contribute to turbidity removal. A l u m i n u m sulfate as a coagulant gave better turbidity removal than ferric chloride. The flocculation of seawater does n o t seem to differ from that of fresh water except that overdosing occurs in a very close range to the point o f m a x i m u m turbidity removal by conventional coagulants. Therefore frequent monitoring o f coagulant dosing is necessary. Flocculation tests were carried out both to test the use of flocculation as a pretreatment process and as preparatory work for contact flocculation-filtration tests. Although these processes differ, a similarity in the relation between removal efficiency, dose and strength of flocs formed was f o u n d by other investigators, showing that there are some c o m m o n mechanisms in the two processes. The use of polyelectrolytes as primary coagulants did n o t give good clarification. This may be due to the relatively low particle concentration, thus making collisions less frequent. However, alum with an anionic polymer gave the best treatment in the case of clays. Although turbidity removal values were n o t always higher than for alum alone, the flocs were larger and settled three times as quickly. The addition of clay as a settling aid did n o t improve t r e a t m e n t and merely increased the a m o u n t of precipitate (making it uneconomical as well). CONCLUSIONS 1. Setting tests in seawater indicate that a sedimentation tank with 1--3 h residence time could give 50--70% turbidity removal. The use of clays as settling aids gives practically no advantage. 2. The best treatment by flocculation in the seawater tested was by aluminum sulfate dosages of 20--30mg/1 with an anionic polyelectrolyte flocculant aid at concentrations of 0.025--0.1 mg/l. 3, A combination of alum and an anionic polyelectrolyte gives the best clarification in artifical seawater containing clay -- about 70--98% turbidity removal. 4. Algae do n o t affect the turbidity level at the concentrations most c o m m o n l y f o u n d in seawater, i.e. less than 103 cells/ml. It is possible to remove them by 45--75% with flocculation using alum or alum and an anionic polymer. 5. A particle counter is useful for the evaluation of the flocculation process and shows t h a t the percent removal of particles is greater than the turbidity removal in the range tested.

241 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This work was supported by a grant from Mekorot Water Company Ltd. and by a scholarship from the Environmental Protection Service, Ministry of the Interior, Israel.

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