Proceedings of the fifth international conference on numerical methods in fluid dynamics

Proceedings of the fifth international conference on numerical methods in fluid dynamics

Computer Physics Communications 14 (1978) 313—314 © North-Holland Publishing Company BOOK REVIEW Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on...

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Computer Physics Communications 14 (1978) 313—314 © North-Holland Publishing Company

BOOK REVIEW Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Numerical Methods in Fluid Dynamics edited by A.I. Van de Vooren and P.J. Zanbergen, Springer—Verlag, 1976. $15.20

This book contains the proceedings of the fifth in a series of biannual conferences on Numerical Methods in Fluid Dynamics, held in this instance at Twente University, Enschede, Holland in June 1976. The book is published by Springer—Verlag as Volume 59 of their ‘Lecture Notes in Physics’ series and includes 59 papers. The Conference typically attracts a varied audience comprised of mathematicians, scientists and engineers working in diverse areas of computational fluid mechanics and this is reflected in the wide range of topics which the papers cover. Examples are ‘A random choice method in fluid dynamics’, ‘Convection induced by mobile particles’, ‘Some methods of resolution of free surface problems’ and ‘Turbulence and transition: a progress report’. The latter two examples are invited papers of substantial length, but the average for the remainder is about six pages: rather inconveniently, they are arranged alphabetic-

ally according to author rather than grouped under subject headings. The accent in the majority of the papers is on the computational techniques themselves rather than the results and their implications. In view of the diversity of topics it is difficult to summarise the contents, but the table prepared below showing the approximate numbers of papers denoted to the various common classes of flow and numerical techniques provides at least a partial picture (about 3/4 of the papers fall within this classification scheme). With regard to this table,the reviewer would have welcomed sufficient papers on techniques for calculating turbulent flows to wari~nta separate entry, since a considerable amount of research has been conducted in this important area: however just one paper was devoted to this topic. To conclude, the diversity and brevity of the papers prevent this book from being a reference text

Table 1 Summary of number of papers devoted to various combinations of flow classes and numerical techniques

Irrotational Inviscid Viscous

Totals

Subsonic

Transonic

Supersonic

2D

2D

2D

3D









FD FE

1 1

FD FE

1 1

FD FE

3D 1

3D



3 1

2 1



5

1

5

3











12 4

2

3

















20

3

4

5

3

Note: 2D = two-dimensional 3D

12 =

three-dimensional

Totals

7 3 15 1 17 4

FD = finite-difference 313

FE

=

finite element.

314

Book Review

for those who are comparatively new to the computational fluid mechanics field and/or are seeking comprehensive information on particular topics, although by way of mitigation many of the papers contain copious references. On the other hand experienced practitioners, especially those with wide interests,

will find the book a useful indicator of the ‘state of the art’ at the time of the Conference. A.D. Gosman Mechanical Engineering Dept. Imperial College London, England