Progress in polymer hybrid materials

Progress in polymer hybrid materials

Accepted Manuscript Title: Progress in Polymer Hybrid Materials Author: Michael R. Bockstaller PII: DOI: Reference: S0079-6700(14)00131-2 http://dx.d...

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Accepted Manuscript Title: Progress in Polymer Hybrid Materials Author: Michael R. Bockstaller PII: DOI: Reference:

S0079-6700(14)00131-2 http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1016/j.progpolymsci.2014.11.001 JPPS 905

To appear in:

Progress in Polymer Science

Accepted date:

27-10-2014

Please cite this article as: Bockstaller MR, Progress in Polymer Hybrid Materials, Progress in Polymer Science (2014), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.progpolymsci.2014.11.001 This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.

Progress in Polymer Hybrid Materials

Michael R. Bockstaller, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon

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University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Email: c

The design of polymer-based materials in which multiple constituents or phases are organized

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across multiple length scales to harness synergistic effects and to facilitate novel functionalities has

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emerged as a versatile approach to resolve challenges across a wide range of material technologies, including transparent conductors, materials for separation, energy generation and storage or drug

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delivery. The unique property combinations that can emerge as a consequence of the particular arrangement and interactions between the constituents provide opportunities for novel disruptive

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material technologies based on polymer hybrid materials. It is thus not surprising that polymer hybrid materials – i.e., materials that are comprised of synthetic polymer as well as biological or

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inorganic derived constituents – present one of the most rapidly growing research areas in current

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polymer science. Central to recent developments in polymer hybrid materials is the concept of ‘structure-related “emergent” properties’ that may be viewed as a distinguishing feature from the more established field of ‘polymer nanocomposites’ that is more concerned with the engineering of the ‘effective’ (average) properties of materials by suitable blending of constituents. Two requisites have been fundamental for the recent surge in interest in polymer hybrid materials: First, recent advancements in the field of polymer chemistry now facilitate the precise coupling of synthetic polymer and biological- or inorganic-derived constituents into complex-structured supramolecular entities that can serve as building blocks for functional materials. Second, progress in understanding of the physics underpinning the evolution of structure and properties in multiphase materials has established a foundation for the design of multicomponent materials in which individual constituents autonomously organize into superstructures with tailored properties. To harness the potential that is afforded by polymeric hybrid materials will require an

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interdisciplinary effort to accomplish more detailed understanding of the interplay between the synthesis, processing, structure and performance of these complex materials. This Special Issue is dedicated to recent developments in the field of polymer hybrid materials across a range of topical areas that illustrate both the intellectual and disciplinary

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diversity but also the breadth of impact that characterizes this field. Wiesner and coworkers as well as Alexandridis and coworkers survey recent developments in block copolymer-based hybrid

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materials. Fundamentally this area is concerned with harnessing the self-organization of block-

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polymer materials into periodic microdomain structures to facilitate the fabrication of hybrid nanostructures with novel functionalities by either co-organization of block-polymer/particle

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blends or the selective conversion of copolymer domains into metallic or ceramic phases. The demonstrated application of block copolymer hybrids in areas such as energy storage and

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separation highlight the potential for technological innovation based on this class of materials. The emergence of novel properties enabled by precision engineering of the microstructure of

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polymer/particle blend materials is also highlighted by Winey and coworkers, who review the field

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of conducting polymer nanocomposites with particular emphasis on the structure-property relations that enable, for example, the development of novel transparent conducting polymer hybrids. Char and Pyun survey the emergent field of ‘colloidal polymers’, i.e., materials derived from the assembly of nanoparticles into string-like superstructures. This work also highlights the role of polymer chemistry (and surface-initiated controlled radical polymerization processes in particular) as a means to control the interaction and assembly of particle building blocks. Balazs and coworkers provide a comprehensive discussion of the structure-property relations in materials comprised of polymer-tethered particle systems and in particular the application of ‘particle brush materials’ as building blocks for self-healing materials. The precise control of the architecture of polymer-based hybrid particles that is facilitated by recent advancements of polymer chemistry also enables novel applications of polymer hybrids in biomedicine. Geckeler and co-workers review the opportunities for polymer-based non-iron oxide hybrid particle systems in applications

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ranging from imaging to drug delivery. As indicated above, the term ‘polymer hybrid material’ extends beyond the scope of classical polymer nanocomposites. In an earlier article Zhong and Klok reviewed recent developments in the field of polypeptide-based materials and showcased the opportunities for polypeptide-based hybrid materials in biomedical technologies such as

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nanocarriers for drug delivery, high efficiency protein pharmaceuticals or tissue engineering. Progress in this field is intimately linked to the development of synthetic techniques to ‘precision

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engineer’ polymer materials that selectively mimic specific biological functions of proteins.

We want to express our gratitude to our contributing authors for their outstanding work

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in framing many of the exciting new trends and developments in the area of polymer hybrid materials. Their treatises give a glimpse into a fascinating new era for polymer-based materials

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science and engineering. Considering that one ‘special issue’ cannot possibly account for all the interesting new developments in the field of polymer hybrid materials, but only present a small

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number of representative examples only raises the impression of the prospects and opportunities

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for this emerging field. In this context it is hoped that this Special Issue will provide a resource for inspiration for researchers across the field of polymer materials and stimulate new discoveries and innovations in polymer hybrid materials.

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