Simplified apparatus for surgical color photography

Simplified apparatus for surgical color photography

SIMPLIFIED APPARATUS FOR SURGICAL COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY WILSON Assistant Resident, SAN T M.D. FOOTER, Stanford Universit,v FRANCISCO, apparatus t...

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SIMPLIFIED APPARATUS

FOR SURGICAL COLOR

PHOTOGRAPHY WILSON Assistant

Resident, SAN

T

M.D.

FOOTER, Stanford

Universit,v

FRANCISCO,

apparatus to be described was constructed with the objective of facilitating the photography of findings during surgical procedures. This was done HE

klospitals

CALIFORNIA (2) the procedure of must be portabIe, taking the picture simpIified, and (3) the danger of contamination of the field minimized.





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Unit in place over patient on operating table. Elevated to two feet above skin sutface. This arrangement is suitable for photographing organs brought up into wound, within two and one-half inches of skin. (Depth of focus at 2 feet is 5 inches; 2 feet -t 2’5 inches.)

FIG.

2.

APPARATUS

FIG. I. Complete surgica1 photographic place over a table ready to photograph specimen. Camera protrudes at left box. Controls are at right.

unit in a gross of fight

in the beIief that simplification of the equipment to the point where it couId be operated entirely by the constantIy changing and photographicaIIy inexperienced personnel of the operating room would encourage the recording in color of interesting surgica1 findings. This is particuIarIy desirabIe in a teaching hospita1. To accompIish this severa requirements must be met; (I) the complete apparatus

The unit consists of the folIowing parts: (I) A 34 mm. Argus coIor camera, with diaphragm set at f4, distance at two feet, and shutter at 455 sec., is mounted on the front of the light box. (2) The Iight box, constructed of sheet metaI, is 8 by IO by I 3 inches and has a screw and bracket attachment on front for the camera. The Iower surface is covered with a pIate of gIass which separates the two Wabash reflector superffood bulbs within from the operative site. Vanes on the upper surface provide ventiIation. (3) The unit is hinged to the cross bar of a Iight standard. It can be adjusted by rotating the cross bar, eIongating the cross bar, rotating the unit at the 55

156

American Journnl of Surgery

Footer-Color

end of this bar and by elevating the entire upper portion of the standard. (4) The controIs for the unit consist of a shutter reIease and spring Iight switch, each on a

OClOE%ER. ,942

Photography

Iight source at the same distance, the light reflected from the various operative fieIds and gross specimens does not vary enough to aIter the exposure appreciabIy.

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1 2 FCET

FIG. 4. FIG. 3. FIG. 3. IIIustrating the aIIowancc which must be made when taking pictures

of areas more than two and one-half inches beIow the skin surface. FIG. 4. Unit angulated for photography of vagina1 and rectal surgery.

FIG. 6

FIG. 5. Remote controls for tights (A) and shutter

(B). FIG. 6. Controls for advancing film. ImmediateIy after each picture press button (c) and turn knob (D) one-quarter turn. Then reIease pressure on button and continue turning knob unti1 resistance is felt. The film is then ready for the next exposure.

five-foot extension. The Iights are on onIy whiIe pressure is appIied to the switch so that accidenta overheating of the tissues is impossibIe. METHOD

Th e procedures necessary for taking a picture with this apparatus consist of: (I) Adjustment of the camera to two feet from the area to be photographed (Figs. 2,3 and 4); (2) centering over this area (the fieId at this distance is IO by 15 inches) ; (3) pressing the Iight switch and then the shutter reIease (Fig. 5); and (4) advancing the fiIm in preparation for the next exposure. (Fig. 6.) It wiII be noted that no exposure meter readings are taken and no adjustments are made on the camera. It has been found that under these constant conditions, the same

SUMMARY

An apparatus for surgical coIor photography is described which combines smaI1 size, portabiIity, simpIicity and rapidity of operation. No photographic knowIedge is required to use it and the resuIts are uniformIy good. The use of this unit is so convenient that the idea1 of a photographic record in natura1 coIor of every operation and gross specimen is attainabIe at negIigibIe but efficient cost* and with inexpensive equipment. * Cost. The total cost of the unit was about $85.00. A projector suitable for medium sized audiences costs $33.50. The fins.1 cost of each coIor sIide, deveIoped and ready for projection, is 13 cents, Iess than a black and white enlargement. NaturaI color prints or black and white enIargements can also be made directIy from these transparencies when needed for publication or case histories.