Sleep Quality and Quality of Life in Patients With COPD

Sleep Quality and Quality of Life in Patients With COPD

Sleep Disorders SESSION TITLE: Sleep, Heart, Brain, and More SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Slide PRESENTED ON: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 at 11:...

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Sleep Disorders SESSION TITLE: Sleep, Heart, Brain, and More SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Slide PRESENTED ON: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 at 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Sleep Quality and Quality of Life in Patients With COPD Hyeon Hui Kang* Shin Bum Kim Sang Haak Lee and Hwa Sik Moon St. Paul’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of) PURPOSE: Sleep problems are common and cause significant disruption in quality of life in chronic pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but there is little data about the impact of sleep quality on quality of life in patients with COPD in Korea. The purpose of this study was to determine association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with sleep quality and quality of life in COPD patients. METHODS: Two hundred patients (93% men) with mild to severe COPD were enrolled prospectively. All patients were evaluated by pulmonary function test for determination of severity of COPD (mild 55; moderate 111; severe 34). The Modified Medical Research Council Scale, Berlin questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) were employed for assessment of patients. RESULTS: Sixty-two (31%) patients were at high risk for OSA. Eighty-two (41%) patients showed poor quality of sleep. The patients with OSA and COPD had worse quality of sleep compared to COPD without OSA (PSQI 6.94.1 versus 5.43.1, p=0.01). Quality of life in COPD patients was significantly correlated with quality of sleep (r=0.376; P<0.001), postbronchodilator FEV1% predicted (r=-0.424; p<0.001), and severity of dyspnea (r=0.360; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: OSA is common in patients with COPD. Sleep quality is also poor among this group. Quality of life in COPD patients was associated with sleep quality, underlying lung function, and the degree of dyspnea. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: It is recommended that more adequate attention is needed to manage the sleep problem of COPD patients. DISCLOSURE: The following authors have nothing to disclose: Hyeon Hui Kang, Shin Bum Kim, Sang Haak Lee, Hwa Sik Moon

SLEEP DISORDERS

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chest.2017.08.1099

Copyright ª 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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