Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing

Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing

AORN JOURNAL in-depth data. As ECG monitoring becomes more frequent, this book could be an excellent reference for students, staff nurses, or nurse e...

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AORN JOURNAL

in-depth data. As ECG monitoring becomes more frequent, this book could be an excellent reference for students, staff nurses, or nurse educators. Its basic information would also make an excellent ediicational format for the community. CHARLOTTE H. OWEN,RN, BSN TAMPA,FLA Te..rtbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing, 5th ed. Lillian S. Brunner and Doris S. Suddath. J B Lippincott Co, E Washington Square, Philadelphia, PA 19105, 1984, 1,638 pp, $43.95 clcthbound.

Nming is expanding to include health maintenance and strategies for self-care. This edition has been expanded to give a balanced presentation of the growing numbers of diagnostic and trwtment modalities and nursing options. ‘Thisbook was written for the nursing student. It provides principles of medical and surgical nursing to help the student understand physiological and psychological effects of disease on the whole person. “Developmental concepts of the adult life cycle” is a new chapter that portrays the differences between, and changes within, individuals during a lifetime.The patient education sections have also been expanded. :Included in this book are an appendix and many helpful diagrams and charts. It would be a good resource book for nurses. EDNAW. Scon, RN, CNOR LAKELAND, FLA Study Guide to Brunner/Suddarthk Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing, 5th ed. Mary Jo Boyer, J B Lippincott Co, E Washington Square, Philadelphia, PA 19105, 1984, 346 pp, $9.50 paperback.

This study guide was developed as a tool to help students focus on content areas considered essential for understanding the concepts, techniques, and disease processes in the textbook. Practical application is tested by exercises for developing nursing care plans and patient teaching guides. Questions, suggestions for discussion,and activities 316

AUGUST 1986. VOL. 44, NO 2

are offered. Answers are keyed by page number to the text for easy reference. It is a useful adjunct to the text. EDNAW. Scorn, RN, CNOR FLA LAKELAND,

Quality Control Circles Focus on Problem-Solving Hospitals are starting to use quality control circles like their counterparts in industry have done for several years, according to MarchIApril Orthopaedic Nursing. Quality control circles are a participatory management technique in which eight to 10 employees from one work area meet regularly to define, analyze, and solve workrelated problems. Circles use techniques such as brainstorming, cause-effect diagrams, and charts to develop solutions. Benefits of a quality control circle are better rapport and communication among the staff and with other departments, and more trust in the nursing administration. Employees who are involved in a circle usually offer more creative and in-depth solutions. To begin a quality control circle, the head nurse (or supervisor of the work area) acts as the leader and obtains the support of the nursing administration. This is necessary because changes in current policies are often suggested, and without administration’s support to implement them, staff morale could decrease. The leader should receive proper training in quality control circle techniques, according to the report. The International Association of Quality Control Circles (801-B W 8th St, Suite 301, Cincinnati, OH 45203) is a resource for locating a training program. According to the report, a person from outside the work unit is needed to o k r v c the grsup prscess,assist the leader in teaching concepts, and serve as a resource and support person for the leader and the circle. The leader should be flexible and allow the staff to define and solve problems; the circle process should not be rushed.