Textbook of orthodontia

Textbook of orthodontia

Department of Orthodontic Abstracts and Reviews Edited by DR. J. A. SALZMANN, NEW YORK CITY All communications’ concerning further information abou...

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Department

of Orthodontic

Abstracts and Reviews

Edited by DR. J. A. SALZMANN, NEW YORK CITY All communications’ concerning further information about abstracted material and the acceptance of articles or books for consideration in this department should be addressed to Dr. J. A. Salzmann. 654 Madison Avenue, New York City

Textbook of Orthodontia: Lea & Febiger,

By

R. H.

W.

Strang.

Third

edition,

Philadelphia,

1950.

Dr. Strang’s third edition presents material of the previous editions in the light of present-day knowledge. This has been necessary in view of the rapid changes in orthodontic practice developed in recent years. Technical procedures included in the book deal only with the fabrication and manipulation of the edgewise arch mechanism. Dr. Strang believes that, “AS far as efficiency, range of action and anchorage potentialities are concerned, the edgewise arch mechanism still surpasses all others and hence is particularly adapted for the treatment of more complicated forms of malocclusion. ” The chapters devoted to treatment of malocclusions follow the principles and procedures of Dr. Charles H. Tweed. Emphasis is placed on the fact that denture expansion is no longer generally considered an efficient method of treatment. The reader is reminded that recognition of the relationship between teeth and their supporting basal bone must always be considered in treatment planning. Many factors are mentioned and discussed as possible etiologic agents in malocclusion. Some might object to this part of the text since the author does not list the factors in any order of importance or seriousness but rather in the conventional method of being either congenital, inherited, or acquired. Combinations of many single factors are often found in a given malocclusion, and if we are not thorough in our analysis we are prone to give undue attention to something that is not of primary importance. The chapters dealing with denture development and biologic considerations are documented, and throughout the entire text references are given along with the, text rather than as a footnote or at the end of the chapter. This book will be helpful to both the student and the practitioner. The principles advocated are based on sound clinical experience. For those not using the edgewise mechanism there is much information that will be valuable. Eugene. West. 307