Textbook of pediatrics

Textbook of pediatrics

November, 1969 The Journal of P E D I A T R I C S 909 Books Book reviem Textbook of pediatrics, ed. 9 Edited by Waldo E. Nelson, M.D., Associate Ed...

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November, 1969 The Journal of P E D I A T R I C S

909

Books

Book reviem Textbook of pediatrics, ed. 9 Edited by Waldo E. Nelson, M.D., Associate Editors: Victor C. V a u g h a n I I I a n d R. James M c K a y , Jr., Philadelphia, 1969, W. B. Saunders C o m p a n y , 1,589 pages. $21.50.

This time, with the aid of two associate editors, it is hoped that this revision will be

for

as well as for the

T h e cardiac surgical patient. Pathophysiologic considerations and nursing care M a r y a n n Powers, R.N., B.S., a n d Francis Storlie, R.N., M.S., New York, 1969, T h e M a c m i l l a n Company, 239 pages. $7.95. This book was written as a guide to student and graduate nurses caring for cardiovascular surgical cases. The first three chapters concern the development and function of the normal heart and congenital and acquired heart disease. In the following five chapters pre- and postoperative nursing, surgical management, arrhythmias, angiocardiography and hemodynamics are presented. The last chapter, which is one of the most useful, is devoted to the role of the public health nurse and to agencies contributing to the care of cardiac patients. Cardiovascular drugs and minor surgical procedures are presented concisely in two appendages. The authors offer valuable hints about adverse reactions of children to a surgical environment. They stress the creation of a friendly, warm atmosphere which allows the child to retain some treasured possessions and encourages the mother's help with his care. Visiting facilities for the patient's family in the intensive care unit are discussed. The design and instrumentation of an intensive care unit is presented extremely well and may serve as a model for other units. The nurse is urged to study hemodynamics and electrocardiography in order to facilitate efficient monitoring. The management of cardiac arrest by nurses is detailed. At times one has the impression that the role of the cardiac resident, as opposed to that of the nurse, is insufficiently

Vol. 75, No. 5, pp. 909-910