The Effect of Nasal CPAP on Nocturnal Reflux in Patients With Aperistaltic Esophagus

The Effect of Nasal CPAP on Nocturnal Reflux in Patients With Aperistaltic Esophagus

The Effect of Nasal CPAP on Nocturnal Reflux in Patients With Aperistaltic Esophagus* ]. Patrick Shoenut; Paul Kerr, M.D.; Allan B. Micflikier, M.D.; ...

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The Effect of Nasal CPAP on Nocturnal Reflux in Patients With Aperistaltic Esophagus* ]. Patrick Shoenut; Paul Kerr, M.D.; Allan B. Micflikier, M.D.; Yoshihiro Yamashiro , M.D.; and Meir H . Kryger, M.D. , F.C.C.P. It has been shown that nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nasal CPAP) significantly reduces nocturnal reflux both in patients with sleep apnea and in patients without sleep apnea but consistent abnormal nocturnal reflux. The mechanism by which CPAP is thought toreduce reflux includes the elevation of the resting lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure. In this study, we tested the effect of nasal CPAP in two groups of patients with aperistaltic esophagus but with different resting LES pressure. Seven patients with scleroderma esophagus and six patients treated for achalasia were tested over a 48-h period. On the first night, the patients were untreated; on the second night, both groups received applied nasal CPAP at 8 em H 20 pressure. The percentage of time the pH <4.0, the number of reflux events >5

Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been shown to reduce nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in both patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and patients without OSAS but abnormal nocturnal GER.l·2 The etiology for the GER in these two groups is different and multifactorial; however , both groups of patients had essentially normal esophageal function and normal resting lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressures. Patients with scleroderma esophagus3.4 and patients who have been treated for achalasia are known to demonstrate abnormal reflux patterns.5•6 In this study , we performed 48 h of continuous esophageal pH monitoring and polysomnography on 13 consecutive patients with classical esophageal aperistalsis, 7 with scleroderma esophagus, and 6 patients with achalasia. To be included in the study, patients had to demonstrate reflux on the first night. On the second night , all patients were treated with 8 em H 20 pressure of nasal CP AP. The efficacy of CP AP in reducing nocturnal reflux in these patients was evaluated. M ETHODS

The study group was composed of 1 3 pa tients. Seven patients had known scleroderma esophagus and six patients had been *From the Departments o f M deicine (Mr. Shoenut, and Drs. Micflikier, Yamashiro, and Kryger) and Surgery (Dr. Kerr ), St. Boniface General Hospital and the University o f Manitoba Winnipeg, Canada. Manuscript received December 2, 1993; accepted F ebruary 3 , 1994 Reprint requests: Dr. KrY, ger, Sleep Disorders Center, 351 Tache Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba R2H 2A6

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min, and the length of the longest reflux event were all significantly reduced in the patients with achalasia (p<0.03), but not in the scleroderma group (p>0.20). These results suggest that a residual resting LES pressure greater than that demonstrated b y patients with scleroderma (> 10 mm Hg) may be necessary for nasal CPAP to affect nocturnal reflux.

(Chest 1994; 106:73841) CPAP=continuous positive airway pressure; GER=gastroesophageal reflux; LES=lower esophageal pressure; OSAS=obstructive sleep apnea syndrome Key words: achalasia; gastroesophageal r eflu x; nasal CP AP ; scleroderma; 24-h esophageal pH monitoring

treated for achalasia by either transthoracic limited m yotomy without fundoplication or pneumatic dilatation. The study protocol has been reported previously1·2 ·7 and consisted of esophageal manometry followed by 48 h of continuous esophageal pH monitoring. The pH studies w ere conducted using a Synectics Mark II digitrapper (Carsen Co, Toronto, Canada). The end of the antimony pH catheter was placed 5 em ab ove the manometricall y determined proximal b order of the LES. The position of the catheter was c hecked flu oroscopically in each case. Patients spent both nights in a sleep l aboratory where polysomnography was perform ed. On the second night, 8 e m H 20pressure was delivered b y nasal CPAP. All patients toleratedthe procedure well and there were no test failures, although some patients did complain that the pressure was not pleasant. Pa tients With Scleroderma

Seven female patients with know n, manometrically proved scleroderma esophagus were studied. All patients had Raynaud 's phenomenon and ranged in age fr om 35 t o 8 1years ( mean , 59 years) . None o f these patients had h ad ch est or upper gastrointestinal tract surgery. Although two of these patients had complained of heartburn, no medication was being taken b y a nypatient that would affect the results o f the manometry o r pH tests. Patients With Achalasia

Six patients with achalasia who had been treated by pneumatic dilatation (n =3) or transthoracic limited m yotomy without fundoplication (n=3 ) werestudied. These were consecutive patients selected b y a previous abnormal nocturnal pH stud y. These patients ranged in age from 32 t o71 years (mean, 46 years). The follow-up time since treatment was 3. 1 ± 1.1 months. Polysomnography

Polysomnography was done toexclude sleep apnea and consisted of 8 h of ove rnight monitoring using standard techniques. Surface electrodes were applied t o obtain an electroencephaloNasal CPAP and Reflux in Patients with Aperistaltic Esophagus (Shoenut eta/)

gram, electro-oculogram, electromyogram, electrocardiogram, and recording of the heart rate. Arterial oxygen saturation was recorded with a pulse oximeter (Biox 3700; Ohmeda Incorporated, Boulder, Colo) set on its fastest response. Respiratory effort was measured using respiratory inductance plethysmography (SARA Unit, Vitalog Inc, Redwood, Calif) and airflow inferred from expired C02 (Datex 223 CO Analyzer, Datex Instrumentarium, Finland). All patients were videotaped to monitor position. Apolygraph (model 78E; Grass Instruments, Quincy, Mass) was used to record data on both paper and floppy disk via a personal computer data acquisition system (IBM compatible). The complete polygraphic record was scored manually for sleep stage, arousal, and movement according to established criteria. Apneas and hypopneas were identified and quantified by computer-based analysis of oxygen saturation. The number of apneas and hypopneas per hour of sleep is called the apnea / hypopnea index (normal <5).

Statistics A two-tailed t test was used to test the statistical differences in the data throughout the study. Numbers are reported as m ean ±SO. RESULTS

No esophageal peristalsis was demonstrated by either group of patients. Simultaneous contractions in the body of the esophagus in the patients with achalasia ranged from 5 to 20 mm Hg (average=13 mm Hg) . Mean resting LES pressure of the patients with achalasia ranged from 10 to 25 mm Hg (mean= 17.1 ±5.8 mm Hg); for patients with scleroderma, the range was 0 to 4 mm Hg (mean, 2.4 ± 1.3). The difference in LES resting pressure was significant (p<0.01) . There was no sleep apnea demonstrated by any patient in either group.

Reflux Status: Patients With Achalasia The percentage of time the pH was less than 4.0 on night 1 ranged from 11.7 to 57.6 percent (38.5±20.6 percent); on night 2, 0.0 to 14.3 percent (2.9±5.6 percent) (p=0.014). The number of reflux episodes

on night 1 ranged from 1 to 17 (6.5 ± 6 5. ) ; on CPAP, the range was 0 to 5 (1.8± 1.9) (p=0.05). The number of reflux episodes longer than 5 min on night 1 ranged from 1 to 6 (2.7 ± 2.1); on night 2, the range was 0 to 2 (0.5 ± 0.8) (p=0.03). The length of the longest reflux episode ranged from 49 to 272 min on night 1 (134.0 ± 104 min); on CPAP, the range was 0 to 46 min (10.1 ± 18.7 min) (p=0.04).

Reflux Status: Patients With Scleroderma The percentage of time the pH was less than 4.0 on night 1 ranged from 2.5 to 86.9 percent (33.9 ± 26.5 percent); on CPAP, 0.2 to 67.7 percent (23.2±23.7 percent) (p=0.4). The number of reflux episodes on night 1 ranged from 1 to 32 (11.1 ± 12.6); on CPAP, the range was from 2 to 8 (4.4 ± 2.3) (p=0.19). The number of reflux episodes longer than 5 min on night 1 ranged from 0 to 5.8 (2.6±2.0); on CPAP, 0 to 5.1 (1.7 ± 1.7) (p=0.4). The length of the longest reflux episode on night 1 ranged from 6 to 430 min (130±148 min); on CPAP, 1 to 15.6 min (68±60 min) (p=0.2). The individual responses to CPAP for both groups of patients are found in Figure l. Typical patient 24-h pH monitoring for a patient with achalasia with CP AP intervention in the second night is found in Figure 2; for a patient with scleroderma , Figure 3. DISCUSSION

Nocturnal GER is an important element in the pathogenesis of esophageal disease. Anecdotal reports in patients with OSAS have suggested that nasal CPAP reduced symptoms of nocturnal reflux in these patients; however, Kerr et al 1 were the first to show that nasal CPAP significantly reduced the percentage of time the pH <4.0, the number of reflux events, and the length of the longest reflux events in

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FIGURE 1. Comparison of reflux , night 1 vs night 2 (8 em CP AP intervention) for patients with achalasia and scleroderma. CHEST / 106 / 3 / SEPTEMBER, 1994

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2. Effect of 8 em H 20 nasal CPAP in a treated (p neumatically dilated) patient with achalasia. A, basal; B, CP AP application during study period. FrGCRE

patients with OSAS. In that report , nocturnal reflux was associated with movement, arousal , and swallowing. Nasal CPAP was shown to reduce nocturnal GER in nonapneic patients. In six patients, Kerr et aF M--p----

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Nasal CPAP and Reflux in Patients with Aperistaltic Esophagus (Shoenut eta/)

min to 13.8 ± 6.9 min (p<0.01) of reflux events. 2 This reduction of reflux was demonstrated without altering the patient's arousal frequency . No change was seen in the amount of daytime reflux, day 1 to day 2. In the same study, the mechanism of this phenomenon was investigated in six volunteers with normal esophageal function. A routine esophageal motility examination was conducted and 8 em HzO pressure of nasal CPAP was then applied during the course of another complete esophageal motility test. Resting LES pressure and the intraesophageal resting pressure were both found to be significantly (p
three of the patients with achalasia from this study are using home nasal CPAP. In conclusion , we believe that nasal CPAP reduces nocturnal reflux in patients who have .residual LES pressure in excess of that found in patients with scleroderma esophagus (those > 10 mm Hg). In studies of patients with resting LES pressure of 14.1, 14.6, and 17.1 mm Hg, nasal CPAP was found toreduce nocturnal reflux significantly. It is not known at present whether long-term CPAP use will prevent reflux-associated complications in patients with achalasia who demonstrate nocturnal reflux. However, further study of nasal CPAP on nocturnal reflux appears warranted. ACKNOWLEDGMENT: Supported by the Medical Research Council of Canada. Dr. Yamashira is a Fellow of the Manitoba Lung Association. REFERENCES

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Kerr P, Shoenut JP, Millar T, Buckle P, Kryger MH. Nasal CPAP reduces gastroesophageal reflux in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Chest 1992; 101:1539-44 Kerr P, Shoenut JP, Steens RD, Millar T, Micflikier AB, Kryger MH. Nasal CPAP: a new treatment for nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux. J Clin Gastroenterol (in press) Hendel L, HageE, Hendel J, Stentoft P. Omeprazole in the long-term treatment of severe gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in patients with systemic sclerosis. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 1992; 6:565-77 Shoenut JP, Wieler JA, Micflikier AB. The extent and pattern of gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with scleroderma esophagus: the effect of low-dose omeprazole. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 1993 (in press) Sauer L, Pelligrini CA, Way L W. The treatment of achalasia: H current perspective. Arch Surg 1989; 124:929-32 Thomson D , Shoenut JP, Trenholm BG, Te~key JM. Reflnx patterns following limited myotomy without fundoplication for achalasia. Ann Thorac Surg 1987; 43:550-53 Johnsson F , Joelsson B. Reproducibility of ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring. Gut 1988; 29:886-89 Halpert RD, Laufer I, Thompson JJ, Feczko PJ. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus in patients with scleroderma. AJR 1983; 140:927-30 Cameron AJ, Payne WS. Barrett's esophagus occurring as a complication of scleroderma. Mayo Clin Proc 1978; 53:612-15 Lee FI, Bellary SV. Barrett's esophagus and achalasia. J Clin Gastroenterol1991; 13:559-61 Feczko PJ, Ma CK, Halpert RD, Batra SK. Barrett's metaplasia and dysplagia in post myotomy achalasia patients. Am J Gastroenterol1983; 78:265-68 Orringer MB, Orringer JS, Dabich L, et al. Combined Collis gastroplasty fundoplication operations for scleroderma reflux esophagitis. Surgery 1981; 90:624-30 Henderson RD, Henderson RF, Marryatt GV. Surgical management of 100 consecutive esophageal strictures. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1990; 99:1-7 Mansour KA, Malone CE. Surgery for scleroderma of the esophagus: a 12-year experience. Ann Thorac Surg 1988; 46: 513-14 Metz DC, Pisegna JR, Fishbeyn VA, et al. Currently used doses of omeprazole in Zollinger-Ellison syndrome are too high. Gastroenterology 1992; 103:1498-1508

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