The effects of lymphokines and monokines on human sperm fertilizing ability in the zona-free hamster egg penetration test

The effects of lymphokines and monokines on human sperm fertilizing ability in the zona-free hamster egg penetration test

Cilationsfrom the Literature male contraception compared with available testosterone esters, it was tested for induction of complete azoospermia when ...

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Cilationsfrom the Literature male contraception compared with available testosterone esters, it was tested for induction of complete azoospermia when combined with depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA, Clinovir, Upjohn GmbH, Heppenheim, Federal Republic of Germany). Twelve men were treated for 7 weeks with weekly intramuscular (IM) injections of 200 mg Anadur followed by 3-weekly IM injections of Anadur up to week 15. Clinovir (250 mg) IM was administered at the start of treatment and during weeks 6 and 12. Anadur and Clinovir suppressed serum gonadotropins. Although serum testosterone declined steeply, in general, libido and potency were not impaired. Sperm concentrations were reduced significantly after 3 weeks of treatment. Lowest sperm counts were seen during week 8 of follow-up, when only 2 volunteers showed measurable sperm counts of 2.1 and 3.0 x 106/ml, with a declining tendency. After 43 weeks, sperm concentrations were still below pretreatment range in 2 men, but later returned to pretreatment values. Computerized sperm motion analysis revealed that motility parameters in the residual sperm were reduced. In vitro analysis excluded a direct effect of medroxyprogesterone acetate in seminal plasma on sperm motion. The data indicate that the combination of Anadur with Clinovir increases the rate of azoospermia in normal volunteers seen under Anadur monotherapy, although the goal of azoospermia in all participants was not quite achieved. Failure of sperm-induced immunosuppression: Association with antisperm antibodies in women Witkin SS Immunology Division, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecol-

ogy, CorneN University Medical College, New 10021; USA

York, NY

American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology; 16015 1 (1166-1168)/1989/ The ability of husbands’ sperm to inhibit proliferation of their wives’ lymphocytes was measured. Seventeen of 27 sperm samples tested (63%) inhibited lymphocytes from responding to Candida antigens. Eleven of the 27 women (41 o/o) had sera that were positive for antisperm antibodies; sperm from only four of their husbands (36%) were immunosuppressive. In contrast, 13 of the 16 women (81%) without antisperm antibodies had partners with suppressive sperm. Lymphocytes from four women with antisperm antibodies were inhibited by sperm from a fertile donor although not inhibited by their husband’s sperm, whereas in three other antibody-positive women neither the husbands’ nor donors’ sperm were inhibitory. Antisperm antibodies in some women may arise as a consequence of a failure of sperm from their male partners to inhibit lymphocyte activation. The effects of lymphokines and monokines on human sperm fertilizing ability in the zona-free hamster egg penetration test Hill JA; Cohen J; Anderson DJ

Fearing Research Laboratory, Boston, MA 02lI5; USA American

Journal

of Obstetrics

(1154-1159)/1989/ Antisperm cell-mediated

Harvard and

immunity

Medical

Gynecology;

School, 160/5

has been associated

I

with

89

infertility in men and women. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the products of activated lymphocytes and macrophages (lymphokines and monokines) affect the fertilizing ability of human spermatozoa in the zona-free hamster egg penetration test. Of a panel of six different purified cytokines tested, the Iymphokine gamma-interferon and the monokine tumor necrosis factor significantly affected the ability of human sperm to penetrate hamster eggs. An inhibitory effect was observed when motile sperm were harvested for use in the assay by a swim-up technique after overnight incubation in low amounts of these cytokines and also when the factors were added to the cultures at the time sperm were introduced to the eggs. These data contribute further evidence that soluble factors produced by activated lymphocytes and macrophages in reproductive tissues could be significant mediators of immunologic infertility. Luteinizing hormone and ovulation timing in a therapeutic donor insemination program using frozen semen Kossoy LR; Hill GA; Parker RA; Rogers BJ; Dalglish CS; Herbert GM 111; Wentz AC

Centerfor Feriility and Reproductive Research, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vanderblit University Center North, Nashville, TN 3 7232; USA American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology; 160/5 I (1169-1172)/1989/ A series of 110 therapeutic donor insemination cycles was analyzed to determine the impact on fecundity when a urinary luteinizing hormone detection kit was used to plan inseminations. To prevent the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus, frozen semen, thawed after a 90-day quarantine, was used. The minimum standard for insemination with cryopreserved semen was a total of 24 x IO” motile sperm per milliliter after thawing. Fecundity was 0.12 when insemination timing was based on cervical mucus evaluation and basal body temperature charts and 0.13 when a urinary luteinizing hormone kit was also used to predict ovulation. Life table analysis with the log rank test showed no statistically significant difference in the number of cycles required to achieve conception between the group of patients using conventional methods of ovulation timing and the group of patients using the urinary luteinizing hormone kit. Urinary luteinizing hormone testing offers no advantage over conventional methods, such as cervical mucus examination and evaluation of basal body temperature, when ovulation is being timed for insemination with frozen donor semen. Trial of support treatment with human chorionic gonadotrophin in the luteal phase after treatment with buserelin and human menopausal gonadotrophin in women taking part in an in vitro fertilisation programme Smith EM; Anthony FW; Gadd SC; Masson GM

Department of Human Reproduction and Obstetrics, Princess Anne Hospital, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO94HA; United Kingdom BR MED J; 298/6686 (1483--1486)/1989/ Objective - To evaluate the effect of support with human chorionic gonadotrophin in the luteal phase in women taking

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