Thin film preparation by chemical vapour deposition

Thin film preparation by chemical vapour deposition

Classified abstracts 628-651 varying the oxygen flow rate into the system indicates that the main effect of substrate temperature during deposition i...

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Classified abstracts 628-651

varying the oxygen flow rate into the system indicates that the main effect of substrate temperature during deposition is to change the oxygen concentration in the films, rather than directly introducing any temperature-dependent changes in the film properties. For films containing from 10-20 at. y0 oxygen, the Ta condensation coefficient and film growth rate are largely independent of temperature. W R Hardy and D Mills, J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 303-306. 30 628. Chromium deposition in a rotary drum evaporator. (USA) A rotary drum evaporator has proved itself capable of depositing thin films that are comparable if not superior to films deposited by other techniques. The thickness of the films is uniform and pinholes have been reduced to less than five per square inch. The model described is capable of handling 12 glass substrates of different sizes, but the design can easily be scaled up to accommodate even more. R G Frleser and G A Brooks, J vuc Sci Tech&, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 307-309. 30 629. Some causes for nonbulk properties in vacuum deposited films. (USA) C H Alexander, Abstract. (Proc. 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 297. 30 630. Source materials for batch coating. (USA) J B Hedge, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 297. 30 631. Magnetic bubble tbm 6lm technology. (USA) J P Reekstin et al, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), JanjFeb 1973, 297. 30 632. Thin film preparation by chemical vapour deposition. (USA) M L Hammond, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 268. 30 633. Physical vapour deposition processes for thick films of metals and compounds. (USA) R F Bun&b, Abstract, (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 271. 30 634. Unusual growth morphology in vacuum evaporation synthesized compounds. (USA) T Barhee et al, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 271. 30 635. Cyliidrical diode continuous vacuum sputtering equipment for laboratory and high volume production. (USA) C H George, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 274. 30 636. Recent advances in composition profiling by simultaneous sputtering and Auger analysis. (USA) _ P W Palmbere. Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symn Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 1; (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 274. _ _ 30 637. Important new properties of an rf coaxial diode sputtering apparatus. (USA) L T Lamont, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 275. 30 638. Molecular beam studies of the kinetics of condensation of solids on surfaces. (USA) R J H Voorboeve, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 276. 30 639. A discussion of some techniques for obtaining elemental composition profiles. (USA) J W Cohum, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 276. 30 640. Characterization of thin 6bns by X-ray diffractometry. (USA) W Par&b, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 277. 342

30 641. Atomic arrangement in ion implanted thin films of Ge. (USA) J F Graczyk and P Cbaudbarl, Abstract. (Proc 19th Symp Nat Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973,277. 30:39 642. The fabrication of an lmplantable blood irradiator by electrodeposition and sputtering. (USA) G G Culver et al, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973,281. 30 643. Metal films for semiconductor applications. (USA) B G Carbaial. Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technoi, i0 (l), Jan/Fib 1973, 284. _ 30 644. Silicon device surface protection with dielectric films and coatings. (USA) J R Szedon et al, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Tech&, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973,284. 30 645. Field ion microscope study of anlsotropic biting forces in Mo,Ga. (USA) 0 Nisbikawa and T Utsumi, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 286. 30 646. Thin-film IV-VI compound diode lasers. (USA) W H Weber et al, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 289. 30 647. The formation and orientation of carbon on platinum single crystal surfaces. (USA) J A Joebstl, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973,294. 30 648. Sputtering. (USA) E Kay, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973, 262. 30 649. Liquid phase Epitaxy--techniques and applications. (USA) H Kressel, Abstract. (Proc 19th Nat Symp Am Vat Sot) J Vat Sci Technol, 10 (l), Jan/Feb 1973,262. 30 650. New device for measuring film thickness by a quartz oscillator. (France) A quartz crystal microbalance is utilized to measure the ‘thickness pertaining to mass’ of a film deposited on this quartz. The change in frequency of the quartz under load is a linear function of the deposited mass. The thickness is read directly on a galvanometer. The instrument is zeroed before each deposition. G Prieur et al, Vide, 27 (161), Sept/Oct 1972, 228-230 (in French). 33. GENERAL

PHYSICS AND ELECTRONICS

33 651. A simple triggered vacuum gap. (India) A simple triggered vacuum gap has previously been described by the authors in this journal. Further studies have resulted in improvement of the performance with regard to sensitivity and consistency of the trigger characteristics and immunity from bridging due to metal particles eroded from the arc. The earlier design suffered from rather frequent bridging of the auxiliary gap and showed rather wide scatter in its trigger characteristics. In the present design thermally stable materials like fused quartz, machinable ceramic ‘Supramica 500 (Mycalex Corporation of America), lead titanate, barium titanate (LCC HTD) and silicon carbide have been used to insulate the trigger electrode from the cathode. Consistent triggerings free from bridging, at relatively low voltages of 200-400 V have been obtained. The materials used cover the range of permittivity E,.= 3.78-1850. It appears that higher permittivity materials result in lower triggering voltages. Silicon carbide gave by far the best performance in the improved design. N Vidyardbi and R S N Rau, J Phys E: Scient Znstrum, 6 (l), Jan 1973:33-34.