University of British Columbia

University of British Columbia

M E E T I N G S , C O N F E R E N C E S , SYMPOSIA E D I T E D BY Τ Η Ο Μ ^ U N I V E R S I T Y O F BRITISH COLUMBIA On January 22, 1969, the newly e...

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M E E T I N G S , C O N F E R E N C E S , SYMPOSIA E D I T E D BY Τ Η Ο Μ ^

U N I V E R S I T Y O F BRITISH COLUMBIA On January 22, 1969, the newly expanded academic facilities of the Ophthalmology Department, University of British Colum­ bia, were officially opened by the University Chancellor, John Buchanan. These facilities are housed in adjacent buildings and include laboratories, clinical investigation and exam­ ination rooms, academic offices, departmental library, a lecture room for undergraduate and graduate instruction and for staff rounds. The open house included the following demonstrations and exhibits : 1. Glaucoma, Prof. S. M. Drance, Dr. D. M. Warner, Dr. K. Uenoyama 2. Strabismus, Dr. J. A. Pratt-Johnson, with the assistance of Miss C. T. Lunn and Miss Alice Pop 3. Retina, Dr. G. S. Harris 4. Cornea and eye-bank, Dr. Eric L. Smith 5. Ophthalmic pathology, Dr. A. Q. McCormick 6. Ophthalmic microbiology, Dr. K. O. Fleming 7. Neuro-Ophthalmology, Dr. A. C. Johnston 8. Low vision, Dr. R. G. McCreery 9. Fluorescein angiography, Dr. G. S. Harris and the Photographic Department, Shaughnessy Hospital The new Baker Ophthalmic Library was officially opened, and a bronze plaque and photograph of the late Lt. Col. E. A. Baker, founder of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, were presented. A large number of senior Canadian aca­ demic ophthalmologists and colleagues from Great Britain and the United States were present at the open house and viewed the new facilities. The Department of Ophthal-

CHALKLEY,

M.D.

mology houses an active Glaucoma Unit, with special facilities for tonography, visual-field studies, electoretinography and ocular pharmacodynamics. In addition, there is clinical research in the fields of strabis­ mus, retina, cornea and eye-bank procedures, neuro-ophthalmology, low-vision aids, oph­ thalmic pathology, microbiology and fluore­ scein angiography. The facilities also pro­ vide special equipment to assist ophthalmolo­ gists in the community in the diagnosis and care of ophthalmic disorders. Funds were obtained from private bene­ factors, the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, Vancouver Foundation, and the Federal Health Resources Fund. Alfred J. Elliot N E W ENGLAND OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY The 504th meeting of the New England Ophthalmological Society was held on Wednesday, December 18, 1968. President Richard H. Dennis opened the morning ses­ sion which was moderated by Robert D. Reinecke. STRABISMUS

Strabismus cases were presented via video tape with live video demonstrations and dis­ cussions following each case presentation. Plans for treatment of each case were criti­ cally analyzed by members and guests. There was general agreement that Duane's retrac­ tion syndrome should not be surgically at­ tacked unless the position of the head was unusually bad. Postsurgical treatment of re­ traction syndromes was generally unsatisfac­ tory in the experience of most observers. Surgical transplantation of the vertical rectus muscles laterally in cases of sixth-nerve